An Echo Through the Snow

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Overview

Rosalie MacKenzie is headed nowhere until she sees Smokey, a Siberian husky suffering from neglect. Rosalie finds the courage to rescue her, and soon Rosalie and Smokey are immersed in the world of competitive dogsled racing. 

Rosalie discovers that behind the modern sport lies a tragic history: the heartbreaking story of the Chukchi people of Siberia. When Stalin?s Red Army displaced the Chukchi in 1929, many were killed and others lost their homes and their beloved ...

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An Echo Through the Snow

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Overview

Rosalie MacKenzie is headed nowhere until she sees Smokey, a Siberian husky suffering from neglect. Rosalie finds the courage to rescue her, and soon Rosalie and Smokey are immersed in the world of competitive dogsled racing. 

Rosalie discovers that behind the modern sport lies a tragic history: the heartbreaking story of the Chukchi people of Siberia. When Stalin’s Red Army displaced the Chukchi in 1929, many were killed and others lost their homes and their beloved Guardians—the huskies that were the soul and livelihood of their people.

Alternating between past and present, telling of a struggling Chukchi family and a young woman discovering herself, Andrea Thalasinos's An Echo Through the Snow takes readers on a gripping, profound, and uplifting dogsled ride to the Iditarod and beyond.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Rosalie MacKenzie finds her life at a dead end until she comes across a neglected Siberian Husky named Smokey. Soon they're the newest team on the competitive dogsled racing circuit. Flashbacks tell the story of the Chukchi of Siberia, who lost not only their homes to Stalin's Red Army but often their beloved Huskies as well. Already slated as the publisher's galley giveaway at BookExpo America.
Kirkus Reviews
Long ago the Guardians protected the Chukchi people of Siberia. These beautiful dogs became the locus for their community and culture. But that was long ago. Thalasinos' debut novel toggles between the stories of Jeaantaa and Rosalie, set nearly a century apart. Jeaantaa's story begins in 1919 Siberia and is framed against the impending invasion of Stalin's Red Army, which ultimately displaces her Chukchi people and destroys much of their culture. Rosalie's story, set in Wisconsin, concerns the cultural effects of displacement. Both young women have endured heartbreak as Jeaantaa's childhood sweetheart dies the day they are affianced, and Rosalie's husband belittles and abuses her. Both are estranged from their communities, with Jeaantaa blamed for her beloved's death and Rosalie too shy to fit in. When Rosalie sees a maltreated husky at the local junkyard, however, her immediate bond with the animal establishes a link across time. Rosalie begins to fall into reveries, dreaming of a woman in a skin dress and boots, standing on the sea ice, hair waving in the screaming wind and mourning the loss of so much, so many. Haunted by Jeaantaa, Rosalie gains the courage to rescue the husky, which enrages her husband but releases in Rosalie a passion she had never suspected. Soon, Jan and Dave hire Rosalie as a dog handler for their dog sled--racing kennel, and Rosalie's talents are abundantly evident. Just as Jeaantaa served as the Keeper of the Guardians, so does Rosalie seem to become a modern-day husky whisperer. Thalasino's evocations of Siberian and Wisconsin seascapes and landscapes are deft and richly embroidered. Her characters hold tantalizing potential (particularly the troubled and secretive Dan Villieux), yet even the connection between Jeaantaa and Rosalie remains oddly forced rather than fated. Beautifully drawn and emotionally resonant, this book unfortunately stumbles over its unrealized characters.
From the Publisher
“Andrea Thalasinos has written a sensitive and engaging story which beautifully illustrates the ancient human/canine bond. Her rendering of the little known story of the Chukchi people of Siberia is heart-wrenching and uplifting at the same time. The interwoven stories of Jeaantaa and Rosalie and the dogs that mean so much to them is destined to become a classic.”

—Susan Wilson, New York Times bestselling author of One Good Dog

“The author's love of dogs and the land come shining through in this compelling and evocative novel. Don't pick it up unless you're able to step on the sled, listen to the panting of the dogs and the thump of their paws on the trail while you enjoy the ride—I read it straight through and couldn't put it down.”

—Patricia McConnell, Ph.D. author of The Other End of the Leash

“Powerful debut...stark, gorgeous prose and a timeless story of love realized, lessons learned, and paths taken.”

—Booklist (starred review)

“Beautifully drawn and emotionally resonant.”

—Kirkus Reviews

“Delicate and vivid as the beadwork Rosalie works on by night, energetic and fast-paced as the dog teams she handles by day, An Echo Through the Snow is an elaborate weaving of past and present, of two women trapped by their circumstances and determined to set themselves free. I loved this book.”

—Michelle Diener, author of In a Treacherous Court

“If you like dogs, history, and richly drawn characters, An Echo Through the Snow is the book you've been waiting for. Fascinating, and deeply moving.”

—Randi Barrow, author of Saving Zasha

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780765330369
  • Publisher: Tom Doherty Associates
  • Publication date: 8/21/2012
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 368
  • Sales rank: 669,220
  • Product dimensions: 5.94 (w) x 8.32 (h) x 1.18 (d)

Meet the Author

Andrea Thalasinos

ANDREA THALASINOS, PhD, is a professor of sociology at Madison College. Her respect for huskies grew while she was running her own sled team of six dogs. She helped found a dog rescue group in the upper Midwest for displaced northern breeds. Andrea lives and writes in Madison, Wisconsin. An Echo Through the Snow is her first novel.

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Read an Excerpt

CHAPTER 1

 

 

Sometimes a story has to be told if for no other reason than to unburden the heart.

—Anonymous

OCTOBER 1929—UELEN, CHUKOTKA, NORTHEASTERN SIBERIA

He strained to catch a glimpse of them through the morning mist. Tariem wiped his runny nose on his sleeve. A truck engine rumbled from the outskirts of the village; the soldiers must have discovered that he’d escaped. Earlier he pried off a few loose boards from the temporary stockade and slipped out.

It was snowing lightly, the clouds low hanging and billowy. Snowflakes gathered in lacy patterns along the folds of his sealskin sleeves, like the mountain ridges where he’d soon be headed. It might have been a peaceful morning if not for the smoke from burning houses, the Red Army’s truck or that his wife was gone. Today all remaining Chukchi along the Bering seacoast were to be evicted. Evacuation orders had been tacked up in Russian on family yarangas for weeks, though no one could read.

Tariem fumbled as he attached the gangline to the remaining sled. The engine sounds stabbed his stomach like spoiled whale meat.

The remaining team of dogs watched in silence as he readied the loaded sled. It was his wife Jeaantaa’s team. The dogs looked wary, especially Kinin. The lead dog’s blue stare pierced the mist. From a puppy he’d been Jeaantaa’s leader, and leaders often ran for no one else.

Tariem lashed the frozen salmon tighter onto the heavy sled. The gut line dug deeply into his palm as he leveraged his weight, securing it to the sled’s driftwood stanchion. He prayed it wouldn’t snap. Losing food on the tundra was death.

He looked to Kinin. The Guardian had bear-thick fur, as blue-black as the Siberian night. Above each crystalline eye a white fur circle grew. These markings proffered guidance from the Old Ones, whose spirits swirled in colorful trails across the sky. Tariem hoped for Kinin to get him out of the village, to the Cave of Many Points, and from there find the twelve-hundred-mile trail to their reindeer-breeding cousins.

The dogs’ whiskers were frosted into snow beards. Though they ordinarily would be yelping with excitement as a sled was being readied, the events of the past few days made them hushed and suspicious. Gaps in the yard stood like missing teeth—only twenty dogs left where there had been eighty.

“Kinin,” he called. The dog lowered his head and didn’t move. Tariem slowly approached, trying to be calm, though the army truck was getting louder. Harness in one hand and a piece of seal meat as an offering to Kinin in the other. Just like Jeaantaa questioned his judgment, Kinin also had doubts.

“They’re coming, Kinin,” he explained. Palms up, he laid the meat down. Dogs couldn’t be forced to run. They’d just lie down. You could beat them, cut off their tails in anger; they still wouldn’t get up.

Tariem glanced at the family yaranga out of habit. “Ku, ku”—he’d not had time to burn their birch and walrus-skin house to free the House Spirit. Now the Spirit would follow, even harm them.

Tariem and the dog turned in the direction of the truck. Kinin’s eyes softened. His one ear twitched; then his body relaxed. “Thank you,” Tariem whispered. Kinin slipped his head and front legs into the harness and then surged, dragging Tariem to the front of the gangline as he toggled him in lead. Kinin pulled the line taut and then watched as the remaining nineteen dogs were quickly attached.

Tariem stepped onto the sled runners and pulled the wooden stake.

“Ke!”

Kinin charged. The Guardians lunged in unison. Tariem fell back from the momentum, grabbing on to the handle to steady himself.

The truck rounded the bend, barreling down the shoreline coming closer to the yaranga. Two soldiers stood in the rear. They pointed, yelling in broken Chukchi for him to stop.

“Ke, ke, ke, Kinin,” Tariem urged, but the smell of fear was enough. Kinin raced to beat the truck, to get past the last yaranga and out to the snowpack. If they didn’t start shooting he’d have the advantage. The sled runners would glide, leaving the truck’s wheels to break through, spinning and whining like a frustrated reindeer scratching off spring’s growth of itchy antler velvet.

Tariem spotted a child’s empty kliak molded in the shape of a foot. Dread spread through his lungs. Blood dotted the snow.

“Ke, ke,” he repeated.

Kinin’s paws flicked snow as he jettisoned the team forward. All twenty spines undulated with speed, their breath syncopated with pounding feet.

Charred Chukchi yarangas blared by, burning in fragrant streams, their smoldering birch poles like red eyes. Tariem braced his knees against the stanchions for balance anticipating the first steep mogul. The runners hit and the sled was airborne. He used his weight to counterbalance, but the sled flipped on its side. Dogs darted back looks as it dragged.

“Ke, ke-e-e-e,” he hollered. The truck gained. Tariem grasped the sled handle, worn smooth from Jeaantaa’s touch.

Soldiers jeered from behind as he struggled to right the sled.

“Ke, ke, Kinin,” he shouted. A gut lash snapped. Bundles of frozen salmon rolled out along with the heavy anorak that Jeaantaa had made for him. The team accelerated on the brief downslope. As he yanked the handle, the sled flipped upright.

Spires of the Siberian tree line were immediately visible to the west, close enough to make out individual branches. If only his will could catapult them. A painful spasm gathered in his throat. He lowered his chin to his sleeve, crouching to make a smaller target, his fingers numb and stinging with cold. Mittens would have to wait until deep within the forest. The gangly-limbed Russians must be cold. He was shorter, more compact.

“Ready.” A command came from behind.

He glanced back. A young soldier unslung his rifle. Tariem turned forward, watching only Kinin and the trail before them. He held his breath, as if doing so could block bullets.

“Fire!”

A shot chipped and sprang one of two strands of walrus-gut ganglines. The team surged, startled. “Forest Keeper,” Tariem cried out to Jeaantaa’s guardian spirit. He eyed the straining gangline. “Breathe your life here.”

With a crack, truck wheels broke through the ice behind him. Curses echoed off the surrounding hills, in first broken Chukchi, then Russian. Soon nothing but the rhythmic breath of the dogs as Kinin entered the stillness of the trees.

*   *   *

Tynga was limping.

“Whoa.” Tariem kicked in the wooden stake. His legs were rubbery; he staggered like a drunken man over to the dog. Her back paw was up. Tariem bent over, and when he touched her leg Tynga yelped and pulled away. Her blood warmed his fingers as he touched them to his lips. She looked up adoringly. Her eyes crinkled as her ears lay flat, tail wagging and thumping against his thigh. In the dim forest light he checked her shoulders, abdomen and back. “Easy,” he said. They’d run two of twelve hundred miles. He could leave her here, or sacrifice her.

Tears burned his eyes. Why Tynga? She was the only one to single him out. From a puppy she claimed him, following him everywhere. It was as annoying as it was touching, but he’d gradually come to accept this love. Crouching down, he looked at Tynga. She bunched her shoulders and licked his face. This was Bakki’s daughter, the color of early orange sunlight, with lichen-colored eyes.

Pride had deafened him to Jeaantaa’s warnings. A day earlier he struck her and then stared dumbfounded as blood dotted her nostrils. Though he was furious at how she’d broken the laws of the Lygoravetlat, or the original ones, he ached for her. She’d never been freely his and now even less so. He hated that he was so powerless to despise her. “A man should never love more than a woman,” years ago the elders warned. “She’s bewitched you.”

The day before, Jeaantaa left with a man named Ramsay who’d come with an Inuit guide from Alaska. Tears cramped Tariem’s throat as he thought of his sons. He imagined them waiting for her at the Cave, not wanting to leave for the longer journey inland in case she’d show.

He dreaded the two-day journey. The burden of not-knowing would drag beside him, like the anxious soul of a dead relative. He’d trudge long past the Valley of Flowers, down the frozen River of the Dead, hoping all the way to the Cave that he was wrong. Praying to Aquarvanguit for the moment when the boys would reach the Cave with Cheyuga and spot their mother’s beautiful face. There she’d be with a fire already started, a bubbling pot of marrow and seal stew. And from there, together they’d begin the monthlong journey inland to their reindeer cousins.

But even if she changed her mind and left for the Cave, Bakki, her fourteen-year-old dog, couldn’t run that far. She had him in lead and not Kinin when she left. And while Bakki wouldn’t make it to the Cave, the dog could make it across the frozen Bering Sea to Rochlit.

Tynga licked mucus from his nose as he squatted. Tariem lifted the dog, stumbling as he carried her back to the sled, her tail thumping. He laid her down onto the sled and raised his knife, arching his back to gain force for a quick kill. Tynga lay quiet and trusting, lifting her leg to expose her belly as she did for only him.

A convulsive sob stopped him. “No more blood,” Jeaantaa had pleaded yesterday. The knife dropped, he buried his face in Tynga’s fur, gasping in spastic heaves. The dog’s musky warmth was a momentary comfort. He picked up the knife and began sawing off a length from the bottom of his anorak. He scooped a handful of snow, packed Tynga’s flesh wound and tightened the bandage around her leg.

“Lay still,” he scolded. “We have a long way.” The dog’s tail thumped against the load as she settled in on top of the sled, her eyes fixed on him.

 

Copyright © 2012 by Andrea Thalasinos

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 8 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews
  • Posted November 8, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Self-discovery and the strength to survive

    Lake Superior is a favorite place of mine and it is also the setting of some recent well written novels, the latest being An Echo Through the Snow by Andrea Thalasinos. Two stories alternate throughout the book, one being the story of Jeaantaa, a Chukchi (native) woman of Siberia at the time of Stalin's persecution in 1920's; and the other story of Rosalie, a Red Cliff Native American living in 1990's Bayfield, WI. I found the early chapters of Jeaantaa's story difficult to follow and felt bogged down by the foreign terms (not explained) and mystical beliefs. I almost set the book aside, which is something that I NEVER do, and luckily, Rosalie's story was enough to keep me going past the first 50 pages.

    To anyone reading this book (which does come with my strong recommendation), I suggest that you go to Andrea Thalasinos's website to learn the historical background to understand the Chukchi natives. Knowing this will help you make connections between Jeaanataa's plight and Rosalie's story much earlier than I did.

    As the story begins, Rosalie is trapped in an abusive marriage, a dead end job, and doesn't even possess a high school diploma -- and she is not even twenty years old. As she watches a "junk yard" watch dog be mistreated Rosalie is compelled to rescue him, knowing it means the end to her sham of a marriage. While she and the dog heal, she begins to train him and is noticed by two area dog sled team owners. They offer Rosalie a job and her life begins to take on meaning as she bonds with the dogs and quickly adds to her own rag tag group of misfits. These cleverly interwoven stories will eventually connect two distinct places and peoples, both defined by the amazing sled dogs we know as huskies.

    The book is filled with well drawn secondary characters whose unique stories add depth to both Jeaanataa and Rosalie. Rosalie's father and her new boyfriend Dan are two that show character and fame/wealth are not necessarily companions. I appreciate how the author drew on Rosalie's Native American heritage (she makes extra money hand beading fine clothing), but does not stoop to make her a cliche. I "read" Rosalie as a young woman caught in bad decisions, partly fostered by her setting and heritage, who is unaware of her strengths and potential. Her chances to set herself free are fostered by others who care and by an unexplainable connection to the animals she loves.

    Lake Superior lovers like myself will hear Bayfield, Squaw Caves, and Cornucopia and will think, I need to read this." Dog lovers will be drawn in by the eyes of the dogs. History buffs will latch on to the struggle to survive of a native group far across the ice flows. And those who love stories of self-discovery will cheer as Rosalie grows into herself.

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 12, 2013

    Historical Fiction- Excellent

    I didn't expect to like this book as much as I did. Initially at times it was hard to keep the characters straight, but reading the "past" accounts made this a page turner that was hard to put down. Just at times I found the main character in the present to be a bit annoying. I am sure she representative of a real person, but still someone you want to slap at times, early in the book.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 8, 2013

    Death taxes and extra hold hairspray

    Fast paced and a very likable heroine

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 28, 2014

    Awesome story!

    I finished reading this book a few days ago and still find myself thinking of this good story! The characters have come to life for me, the sign of a good writer, and their plight and determination give hope to all who read this book. Great find!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 21, 2014

    Thoroughly enjoyed this book.

    The book started a little slow for me but in no time I was hooked and couldn't put it down. I love stories about dogs and the relationships/bonds with their people. I had a husky for 14 years so this story really touched my heart.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 8, 2014

    Great book. I could not put it doown.

    Quite an interesting cast of caractors. Love reading about this very cold area, but would not like to live there. So I just travel to it in a good book and stay warm.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 19, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 5, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

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