An Essay Concerning Human Understanding

An Essay Concerning Human Understanding

2.8 6
by John Locke
     
 

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In An Essay concerning Human Understanding, John Locke sets out his theory of knowledge and how we acquire it. Eschewing doctrines of innate principles and ideas, Locke shows how all our ideas, even the most abstract and complex, are grounded in human experience and attained by sensation of external things or reflection upon our own mental activities. A thorough…  See more details below

Overview

In An Essay concerning Human Understanding, John Locke sets out his theory of knowledge and how we acquire it. Eschewing doctrines of innate principles and ideas, Locke shows how all our ideas, even the most abstract and complex, are grounded in human experience and attained by sensation of external things or reflection upon our own mental activities. A thorough examination of the communication of ideas through language and the conventions of taking words as signs of ideas paves the way for his penetrating critique of the limitations of ideas and the extent of our knowledge of ourselves, the world, God, and morals.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Oxford World Classics offers yet another abridgment of Locke s Essay Concerning Human Understanding. Do we really need another? Yes, when it s as well done as
Phemister s."-Philosophy in Review

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780872202160
Publisher:
Hackett Publishing Company, Inc.
Publication date:
10/01/1996
Series:
Hpc Classics Series
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
380
Sales rank:
303,705
Product dimensions:
5.30(w) x 8.40(h) x 0.80(d)

Meet the Author

Pauline Phemister is Reader in Philosophy at the University of Edinburgh.

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An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading) 2.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
JWL More than 1 year ago
I read this book over the summer, so I'm a little late on me review. This book took me about four weeks to read. Although the book isn't all too long, it required more studying that books you may be used to. John Locke has remained on my top five favorite philosphers, however, I feel he has always had trouble with clarity. He uses many examples in this book to illustrate "simple ideas" and "complex ideas;" however, if you don't understand the premises to all his arguments it will be very difficult to continue throughout the reading. I highly recommend this book to philosophy students, scholars, and those interested in past thinkers.
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