An essay on the external corn trade

An essay on the external corn trade

by Robert Torrens
     
 

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The book may have numerous typos or missing text. It is not illustrated or indexed. However, purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original rare book from the publisher's website. You can also preview the book there.
Purchasers are also entitled to a trial membership in the publisher's book club where they can select from more than a million books for… See more details below

Overview

The book may have numerous typos or missing text. It is not illustrated or indexed. However, purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original rare book from the publisher's website. You can also preview the book there.
Purchasers are also entitled to a trial membership in the publisher's book club where they can select from more than a million books for free.

Original Publisher: Printed for Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, and Green Publication date: 1829
Subjects: Grain trade; Corn laws (Great Britain); Wages; Business

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940023658353
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
0 MB

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CHAP. III. On the Influence of the external Trade in Corn on the Subsistence, Wealth, and Prosperity of the Country which permanently exports Grain. In the preceding chapter we considered the foreign trade in corn; as, by equalising food through different countries, and different periods, by establishing granaries, and by giving encouragement to agriculture, it rectifies the irregularities of the seasons, and ensures, at all times, a steady and an abundant supply of human sustenance. In the present, and in the succeeding chapter, we will take a less general view of the question, and consider the foreign trade, not as it alternately removes redundancy, supplies deficiency, and regulates the supply of food throughout the world; but, as it affects the subsistence, wealth, and prosperity, of those particular countries which permanently export, or permanently import grain. When overflowing harvests have, in one country, reduced the price of corn, while, in some neighbouring country, deficient harvests have raised it, then corn will flow from the one into the other. This, however, would be a merely temporary adjustment of supply, and could not give the former the character of an exporting, nor the latter the character of an importing, country. But when, in average years, the price of corn is comparatively lower in one country than it is, in such years, in another; or while this other country has comparatively lower prices in something else, then the one will permanently export, and the other permanently import, subsistence. For example : while Poland can raise corn comparatively cheaper than England, or England prepare cloth comparatively cheaper than Poland, the latter, unless someviolent interference should prevent it, will become an exporting, and the former an importing, c...

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