An Interactive History of The Attack on Pearl Harbor (Enhanced Edition) [NOOK Book]

Overview

Includes:


•An original history about the Attack on Peal Harbor


•Audio: An original radio broadcast breaking news of the attack


•Video: Avenge December 7 , a government advertisement for war bonds


• Video: A contemporary newsreel on the attack


•American and Japanese documents from Pearl Harbor, and FDR’s speech seeking a declaration of war after Pearl Harbor


“We won a great tactical victory at Pearl Harbor and thereby lost the war.” – Admiral Hara Tadaichi


All ...

See more details below
An Interactive History of The Attack on Pearl Harbor (Enhanced Edition)

Available on NOOK devices and apps

  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$4.49
BN.com price
(Save 10%)$4.99 List Price

Overview

Includes:


•An original history about the Attack on Peal Harbor


•Audio: An original radio broadcast breaking news of the attack


•Video: Avenge December 7 , a government advertisement for war bonds


• Video: A contemporary newsreel on the attack


•American and Japanese documents from Pearl Harbor, and FDR’s speech seeking a declaration of war after Pearl Harbor


“We won a great tactical victory at Pearl Harbor and thereby lost the war.” – Admiral Hara Tadaichi


All Americans are familiar with the “day that will live in infamy.” At 9:30 a.m. on Sunday, December 7, 1941, Pearl Harbor, the advanced base of the United States Navy’s Pacific Fleet, was ablaze. It had been smashed by aircraft launched by the carriers of the Imperial Japanese Navy. All eight battleships had been sunk or badly damaged, 350 aircraft had been knocked out, and over 2,000 Americans lay dead. Indelible images of the USS Arizona exploding and the USS Oklahoma capsizing and floating upside down have been ingrained in the American conscience ever since. In less than an hour and a half the Japanese had almost wiped out America’s entire naval presence in the Pacific.


Less than 24 hours earlier, Japanese and American negotiators had been continuing their diplomatic efforts to stave off conflict in the region, but as they did, President Roosevelt and his inner circle had seen intelligence reports strongly suggesting an imminent attack - though they did not know where. The U.S. rightly believed that Japan would take action to prevent the Americans from interfering with their military activities in Southeast Asia, and American military forces in the Philippines were already bracing for a potential attack. However, as the negotiations were ongoing, the powerful Japanese carrier fleet had been surging southwards through the Pacific while maintaining radio silence, preparing to strike the blow that would ignite war in an area spanning half the globe. Navy Commander-in-Chief Isoroku Yamamoto, whose code of honor demanded that the Japanese only engage enemies after a formal declaration of war, had been given assurances that his nation would be formally at war with the United States prior to the arrival of his planes over Pearl Harbor.


As it turned out, those assurances were worth nothing, and Yamamoto had been misled by extremists in his government just as the Americans were misled. In fact, the Japanese would infamously deliver documents formally cutting off negotiations with the American government after the attack on Pearl Harbor had already been conducted. Far from a formal declaration of war, America was attacked without warning, plunging the world’s largest democracy into history’s deadliest conflict.


Pearl Harbor was unquestionably one of the seminal events in American history, and given the nature of the surprise attack, the entry of the U.S. into the war, and the lingering controversies and conspiracy theories, the attack on Pearl Harbor continues to be a highly charged and heavily debated event.


An Interactive History of The Attack on Pearl Harbor Collection chronicles the history leading up to the surprise attack, the attack itself, its aftermath, its lasting legacy and the controversies still surrounding it. This collection includes an original history about the attack, contemporary news and video reports about the attack, communications between the American and Japanese governments before the attack, and President Roosevelt’s famous speech seeking a declaration of war after the attack. It also includes pictures and a Table of Contents.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781625397133
  • Publisher: Charles River Editors
  • Publication date: 1/22/2013
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 759,680
  • File size: 72 MB
  • Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 2 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 13, 2013

    Please disregard my first review

    My apologies. I found the enhanced features in the book. It would be nice to have this with a link in the table of conents but it is still cool! So this is what I was looking for!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 29, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)