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An introduction to the scientific study of English poetry; being prolegomena to a science of English prosody
     

An introduction to the scientific study of English poetry; being prolegomena to a science of English prosody

by Mark Harvey Liddell
 
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This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
CHAPTER III GENERAL ASPECTS AND LIMITATIONS OF POETRY While the verses from Shakspere which we have just examined (a few English words arranged in a way that is pleasing to

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Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
CHAPTER III GENERAL ASPECTS AND LIMITATIONS OF POETRY While the verses from Shakspere which we have just examined (a few English words arranged in a way that is pleasing to English ears) are quite insufficient of themselves to give us an adequate idea of poetry in general, they nevertheless contain the essential characteristics of all poetry. We should find nothing essentially new if we took Homer, Dante, or Goethe, but essentially the same elements; an interesting thought in a beautiful form of expression. The interest of the thought might vary in different times and among different nations ; the beautiful form might be a form far different from Shakspere's five-wave rhythm- series ; yet the two elements, interest and beauty, would still be there; and the interest would be the interest of words and the beauty the beauty of well-ordered thought. All through our experiment, rough and mechanical though it was, we tried to keep in the foreground these essential elements of poetry, and the fact that we were dealing with a beautiful thing, and not with a few verses from Macbeth.Let us now, therefore, seek to determine in as wide and embracing a sense as we may what these elements are as they have taken to themselves their various forms in the history of poetry. Perhaps we shall best be able to do this by conceiving our poetic phenomena as being subject to certain limitations marking them off from other groups of phenomena which are not poetic in character. We have seen that the determining element in the undoubtedly poetic thought-expression which we had before us was what we called a Verse Form ; that the removal of this Verse Form destroyed the evidently poetic character of the thought-formulation ; that whatever other beauty it possessed, this was the determining beau...

Product Details

BN ID:
2940021021463
Publisher:
New York Doubleday, Page
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
405 KB

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CHAPTER III GENERAL ASPECTS AND LIMITATIONS OF POETRY While the verses from Shakspere which we have just examined (a few English words arranged in a way that is pleasing to English ears) are quite insufficient of themselves to give us an adequate idea of poetry in general, they nevertheless contain the essential characteristics of all poetry. We should find nothing essentially new if we took Homer, Dante, or Goethe, but essentially the same elements; an interesting thought in a beautiful form of expression. The interest of the thought might vary in different times and among different nations ; the beautiful form might be a form far different from Shakspere's five-wave rhythm- series ; yet the two elements, interest and beauty, would still be there; and the interest would be the interest of words and the beauty the beauty of well-ordered thought. All through our experiment, rough and mechanical though it was, we tried to keep in the foreground these essential elements of poetry, and the fact that we were dealing with a beautiful thing, and not with a few verses from Macbeth.Let us now, therefore, seek to determine in as wide and embracing a sense as we may what these elements are as they have taken to themselves their various forms in the history of poetry. Perhaps we shall best be able to do this by conceiving our poetic phenomena as being subject to certain limitations marking them off from other groups of phenomena which are not poetic in character. We have seen that the determining element in the undoubtedly poetic thought-expression which we had before us was what we called a Verse Form ; that the removal of this Verse Form destroyed the evidently poetic character of thethought-formulation ; that whatever other beauty it possessed, this was the determining beau...

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