Analogue-based Drug Discovery III by Janos Fischer, NOOK Book (eBook) | Barnes & Noble
Analogue-based Drug Discovery III

Analogue-based Drug Discovery III

by Janos Fischer
     
 

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Most drugs are analogue drugs. There are no general rules how a new drug can be discovered, nevertheless, there are some observations which help to find a new drug, and also an individual story of a drug discovery can initiate and help new discoveries. Volume III is a continuation of the successful book series with new examples of established and recently introduced

Overview

Most drugs are analogue drugs. There are no general rules how a new drug can be discovered, nevertheless, there are some observations which help to find a new drug, and also an individual story of a drug discovery can initiate and help new discoveries. Volume III is a continuation of the successful book series with new examples of established and recently introduced drugs.
The major part of the book is written by key inventors either as a case study or a study of an analogue class. With its wide range across a variety of therapeutic fields and chemical classes, this is of interest to virtually every researcher in drug discovery and pharmaceutical chemistry, and -- together with the previous volumes -- constitutes the first systematic approach to drug analogue development.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“The book’s 15 chapters and 40 authors from 9 countries bring important, successful drug discoveries closer to medicinal chemists and all who are interested in the history of drug discoveries.  The major part of the chapters are written by key inventors.”  (Chemistry International, 1 January 2013)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9783527651108
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
10/15/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
404
File size:
8 MB

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
“The book’s 15 chapters and 40 authors from 9 countries bring important, successful drug discoveries closer to medicinal chemists and all who are interested in the history of drug discoveries. The major part of the chapters are written by key inventors.” (Chemistry International, 1 January 2013)

Meet the Author

Janos Fischer is a Senior Research Scientist at Richter Plc., Budapest, Hungary. He received his MSc and PhD degrees in organic chemistry from the Eotvos University of Budapest under Professor A. Kucsman. Between 1976 and 1978, he was a Humboldt Fellow at the University of Bonn under Professor W. Steglich. He has worked at Richter Plc. since 1981 where he participated in the research and development of leading cardiovascular drugs in Hungary. His main interest is analogue based drug discovery. He is the author of some 100 patents and scientific publications. In 2004, he was elected as a Titular member of the Chemistry and Human Health Division of IUPAC. He received an honorary professorship at the Technical University of Budapest.

C. Robin Ganellin studied Chemistry at London University, receiving a PhD in 1958 under Professor Michael Dewar, and was a Research Associate at MIT with Arthur Cope in 1960. He then joined Smith Kline&French Laboratories in the UK and was one of the co inventors of the revolutionary drug, cimetidine (also known as Tagamet). In 1986, he was made a Fellow of the Royal Society and appointed to the SK&F Chair of Medicinal Chemistry at University College London, where he is now Professor Emeritus of Medicinal Chemistry. Professor Ganellin is co inventor of over 160 patents and has authored over 260 scientific publications. He was President of the Medicinal Chemistry Section of the IUPAC and is Chairman of the IUPAC Subcommittee on Medicinal Chemistry and Drug Development.

David Rotella is the Margaret and Herman Sokol Professor of Medicinal Chemistry at Montclair State University. He earned a B.S. Pharm. degree at the University of Pittsburgh (1981) and a Ph.D. (1985) at The Ohio State University with Donald. T. Witiak. After postdoctoral studies in organic chemistry at Penn State University with Ken S. Feldman, he was an assistant professor at the University of Mississippi. David worked at Cephalon, Bristol-Myers, Lexicon and Wyeth where he was involved in neurodegeneration, schizophrenia, cardiovascular and metabolic disease drug discovery projects.



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