Analysing for Authorship: A Guide to the Cusum Technique

Overview

Analysing for Authorship is the first book to provide a clear and comprehensive guide to cusum technique, a scientific method for the attribution of utterance. Attributing authorship is often a matter of legal urgency or fierce scholarly debate. Did Derek Bentley really make that confession? Was that story just discovered really by D. H. Lawrence? The cusum (cumulative sum) technique (or QSUM), developed in 1988 by Andrew Q. Morton, is a recognition system applied to human utterance, whether written or spoken, ...
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Overview

Analysing for Authorship is the first book to provide a clear and comprehensive guide to cusum technique, a scientific method for the attribution of utterance. Attributing authorship is often a matter of legal urgency or fierce scholarly debate. Did Derek Bentley really make that confession? Was that story just discovered really by D. H. Lawrence? The cusum (cumulative sum) technique (or QSUM), developed in 1988 by Andrew Q. Morton, is a recognition system applied to human utterance, whether written or spoken, based on analysing sequences of language units by a cumulative sum method of counting. Each person's QSUM 'fingerprint' retains consistency across his or her written and spoken utterance and across different genres. Problems addressed and illustrated in this book include the application of QSUM in legal and forensic cases (contested confessions and statements, anonymous letters); in proving or disproving plagiarism; in identifying edited or translated text; in the analysis of authorship of disputed literary and theological texts. Jill Farringdon demonstrates the consistency of the QSUM fingerprint over time - for literary subjects and in the early utterance of children combined with their adult utterance. She also examines QSUM application to dialect and non-standard English.
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Editorial Reviews

Sir Kenneth Dover

“A first-rate book, a definitive and admirably lucid exposition of the QSUM technique.” –Sir Kenneth Dover

The Semiotic Review of Books

“ . . . a remarkable book in applied stylometry . . . ” –The Semiotic Review of Books

Professor Martin C. Battestin

“. . . a fascinating book. . .for the first time, the QSUM technique is explained in lucid detail, the objections to it are cogently refuted, and the method's efficacy in solving particular problems of authorship attribution in literature and in law is, in a quite literal sense, graphically demonstrated. There is a remarkable chapter on the development of speech in Helen Keller. And there are literary examples aplenty, among them the authors of The Federalist papers (James Madison and Alexander Hamilton) and Mark Twain; D. H. Lawrence, Muriel Spark, Tom Stoppard, Anthony Burgess - and Henry Fielding . . . There are pitfalls to be avoided, and technical subtleties to be mastered. . .Jill Farringdon carefully identifies these difficulties and, in prose that is clear and jargon free, tells us how to deal with them.” –Professor Martin C. Battestin, Department of English, University of Virginia

Swansea Review

“For those inclined to look into its possibilities there is certainly no other book so well able to introduce, explain and illustrate this method of analysis.” –Swansea Review

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Product Details

Table of Contents

Preface

Acknowledgments

 

PART I     Introduction and history: the method of cusum analysis and a test case

 

   Chapter 1     Introduction

   Chapter 2     The Method

   Chapter 3     A Test Case for the Attribution of Authorship

 

PART II     Literary and linguistic attributions:  the range of QSUM

 

   Chapter 4     Fingerprinting Authors

   Chapter 5     Henry Fielding as Translator

   Chapter 6     QSUM and Young Language

   Chapter 7     Literary Attributions: Varieties and Forms

 

PART III     Forensic applications: preparing a legal report; attributing non-standard English; the critics answered

 

   Chapter 8     Legal Applications - Michael Farringdon

   Chapter 9     Non-Standard English and the Courts: Linguistic/Social

                        Background

                        A Case History - M. David Baker

 Chapter 10     The  Critics Answered

 

PART IV     A detailed account of the development of the cusum technique

 

 Chapter 11     The Question of Authorship - A. Q. Morton

 

Notes

Select Bibliography

Index

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