BN.com Gift Guide

The Analysis Of Film / Edition 1

Paperback (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $10.00
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 58%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (16) from $10.00   
  • New (11) from $16.67   
  • Used (5) from $10.00   

Overview

"No serious student of film should miss the great work collected in this volume."—W. A. Vincent, Choice

"When so much writing about film is based on overall impressions or shadowy memories, on notes scribbled in the dark or published shot breakdowns that are often overgeneralized or even inaccurate, it is refreshing to be confronted with such scholarly work, characterized by a genuinely attentive eye and a punctilious observation of detail. This long-awaited collection, gathering Bellour’s ground breaking studies into one volume, will surely be a crucial source of inspiration for future generations of film scholars." —Peter Wollen, Bookforum

The Analysis of Film brings together Raymonds Bellour's now classic studies of classic Hollywood film. It is at once a book about the methods of close film analysis, the narrative structure of Hollywood film, Hitchcock's work—The Birds, Marnie, Psycho, North by Northwest—and the role of the woman in western representation. But, finally, it is a book about cinema itself and the love for cinema that drives the passion for analyzing the supreme art form of the twentieth century.

Bellour creatively reworks the ideas and methods of structuralism, semiology, and psychoanalysis to unravel the knot of significations that is the filmic text. The introductory chapter sketches out a history of the way the close analysis of film developed. And then, beginning with a study of the Bodega Bay sequence of The Birds, the book goes on to examine every aspect of that singular critical practice, "the analysis of film."

The book is also a model of how to write about the intricacies of film narrative, shot by shot, sequence by sequence, while addressing larger contextual issues of subjectivity, desire, and identification in Western cultural forms. A new, final chapter on D. W. Griffith's The Lonedale Operator brilliantly demonstrates that the dynamics of repetition and alternation that Bellour discovered to be the heartbeat of Hollywood narrative film were already there in nascent form at the beginnings of cinema.

Indiana University Press

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Choice
Written between 1969 and 1990, the essays in this collection remind the reader of what a brilliant film analyst Bellour was. Building on the work of Lacan, Metz, and Thierry Kuntzel, Bellour developed his own approach to analysis based primarily on a shot-by-shot study. This method enabled him to come as close as possible to surmounting what he perceived as the greatest difficulty in analyzing films—how to capture the moving image in words. Most of the essays here deal with Hitchcock films—The Birds, Psycho, Marnie, and North by Northwest. The last shows Bellour at his magisterial best: he couples a carefully worked out Oedipal interpretation of the plot with a close reading of the crop—duster sequence. The result is one of the best pieces ever written on Hitchcock. The other Hitchcock essays are also superb. The editor included pieces on other films—The Big Sleep, Gigi, The Lonedale Operator—but it is for the Hitchcock analyses that this book will be most valued. No serious student of film should miss the great work collected in this volume.W. A. Vincent, Michigan State University, Choice, November 2000

— W. A. Vincent, Michigan State University

Choice - W. A. Vincent

Written between 1969 and 1990, the essays in this collection remind the reader of what a brilliant film analyst Bellour was. Building on the work of Lacan, Metz, and Thierry Kuntzel, Bellour developed his own approach to analysis based primarily on a shot-by-shot study. This method enabled him to come as close as possible to surmounting what he perceived as the greatest difficulty in analyzing films—how to capture the moving image in words. Most of the essays here deal with Hitchcock films—The Birds, Psycho, Marnie, and North by Northwest. The last shows Bellour at his magisterial best: he couples a carefully worked out Oedipal interpretation of the plot with a close reading of the crop—duster sequence. The result is one of the best pieces ever written on Hitchcock. The other Hitchcock essays are also superb. The editor included pieces on other films—The Big Sleep, Gigi, The Lonedale Operator—but it is for the Hitchcock analyses that this book will be most valued. No serious student of film should miss the great work collected in this volume.W. A. Vincent, Michigan State University, Choice, November 2000

From the Publisher
Written between 1969 and 1990, the essays in this collection remind the reader of what a brilliant film analyst Bellour was. Building on the work of Lacan, Metz, and Thierry Kuntzel, Bellour developed his own approach to analysis based primarily on a shot-by-shot study. This method enabled him to come as close as possible to surmounting what he perceived as the greatest difficulty in analyzing films—how to capture the moving image in words. Most of the essays here deal with Hitchcock films—The Birds, Psycho, Marnie, and North by Northwest. The last shows Bellour at his magisterial best: he couples a carefully worked out Oedipal interpretation of the plot with a close reading of the crop—duster sequence. The result is one of the best pieces ever written on Hitchcock. The other Hitchcock essays are also superb. The editor included pieces on other films—The Big Sleep, Gigi, The Lonedale Operator—but it is for the Hitchcock analyses that this book will be most valued. No serious student of film should miss the great work collected in this volume.W. A. Vincent, Michigan State University, Choice, November 2000
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780253213648
  • Publisher: Indiana University Press
  • Publication date: 10/1/2001
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 328
  • Product dimensions: 6.12 (w) x 9.25 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Raymond Bellour is Director of Research at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique. He is a scholar and writer whose work has been devoted to both literature—especially the Brontës, Dumas, and Michaux—and film—most notably L'Analyse du film, first published in 1979, and several related collections including Le Cinéma Américain and Le Western. Since the early eighties his work has concentrated on mixed media and the relation between words and images. This new focus has resulted in an exhibition, Passages de l'image (1989); a book, L'Entre-Images (1990); and a MOMA catalog, Jean-Luc Godard: Sonimage (1992). In 1991, with Serge Daney, he started the film journal Trafic.

Constance Penley is Professor and Chair of Film Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. A founding editor of the leading feminist media journal, Camera Obscura, she also edited the influential collection Feminism and Film Theory. Penley has written widely in the fields of film studies, cultural studies, and science studies. Her most recent books are NASA/TREK: Popular Science and Sex in America and The Invisible Woman: Imaging Technologies, Gender, and Science, edited with Paula Treichler and Lisa Cartwright.

Indiana University Press

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Preface by Constance Penley

A Bit of History

1. The Unattainable Text
2. System of a Fragment (on The Birds)
3. The Obvious and the Code (on The Big Sleep)
4. Symbolic Blockage (on North by Northwest)
5. To Segment/To Analyze (on Gigi)
6. To Enunciate (on Marnie)
7. Psychosis, Neurosis, Perversion (on Psycho)
8. To Alternate/ to Narrate (on The Lonedale Operator)

Notes
Works by Raymond Bellour
Index

Indiana University Press

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 30, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    The Analysis of Film

    My first read on the introduction proved most difficult, but on the second read much more helpful and helpful to understand its application to my Cinema Studies papers.
    I felt the authors discussion highly worded or difficult to understand, grasp, but this also I comprehended more on returning to the book. I look forward to its usefulness on my remaining papers.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)