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Analysis of the Electrical Activity of the Brain
     

Analysis of the Electrical Activity of the Brain

by Franco Angeleri (Editor), Stuart Butler (Editor), Salvatore Giaquinto (Editor), Jerzy Majkowski (Editor)
 

Ever since Galvani's discovery of the electrical sensitivity of the neuromuscular system in 1791, and the subsequent discovery that the EEG varied systematically with the functional state of the brain, progress in neurophysiology and its clinical application has been dependent upon advances in technology. With the advent of computers, however, technology is no

Overview

Ever since Galvani's discovery of the electrical sensitivity of the neuromuscular system in 1791, and the subsequent discovery that the EEG varied systematically with the functional state of the brain, progress in neurophysiology and its clinical application has been dependent upon advances in technology. With the advent of computers, however, technology is no longer the rate-limiting factor. Computer programs are readily available to detect biologically significant signals amid background noise, to characterise the EEG in terms of its spectral composition and dimensionality, and even to calculate its anatomical generators from the topography of surface potentials and their derivatives. Nowadays, therefore, problems tend to be encountered with the utility of the available mathematical algorithms, and the ability of mathematicians and neurophysiologist to share their ideas. Analysis of the Electrical Activity of the Brain aims to provide an accessible introduction to the use of mathematical concepts and algorithms in EEG data analysis and to promote an exchange of ideas between the disciplines of neurophysiology and applied mathematics. Divided into sections covering nonlinear dynamical analysis, spectral analysis, signal detection, and topography and source localisation, the book includes details on all the latest techniques in addition to providing clear and understandable accounts of established methods. Worked examples and case studies are featured to enable clinical neurophysiologists to increase their understanding of methods and to improve their knowledge of everyday techniques. General and experimental neurophysiologists, neurologists and physiologists, together with applied mathematicians, will also find this book to be of interest.

Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: John R. Hughes, MD, PhD (University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine)
Description: This book represents a skillful attempt to explain nonlinear dynamical analysis, signal detection, topography, and source localization.
Purpose: The purpose is to "promote the understanding of mathematical methods among neurophysiologists and to encourage communication between these disciplines."
Audience: The audience is the neurophysiologist who needs greater understanding of these complex mathematical concepts and, in general, the book is successful. Only in a few chapters are the writing and the calculus sufficiently complex to overly challenge the reader.
Features: Special features in this book include some excellent color illustrations of topographic brain maps as one of the clinical applications of EEG analysis. Another excellent feature is the group of five chapters on source localization, especially the clinical applications of voltage topography and source localization in partial epilepsy.
Assessment: Perhaps the most difficult portions of the book are represented by the chapters on nonlinear dynamical analysis that include discussions of the fractal dimension, delay-timing embedding, estimating correlation dimension, saturation, surrogate-data testing, and, in general, the measures derived from chaos theory as applied to brain activity. The Lyapunov exponents, stationarity, and dynamic changes in relation to clinical events are an attempt to relate these concepts to the patient. As mentioned by one of the authors, "there is also the promise that nonlinear strategies of data analysis in combination with well-articulated theories will eventually offer possibilities for an enhanced understanding of the nature of the EEG-generating system and its pathological variants."
3 Stars from Doody
John R. Hughes
This book represents a skillful attempt to explain nonlinear dynamical analysis, signal detection, topography, and source localization. The purpose is to ""promote the understanding of mathematical methods among neurophysiologists and to encourage communication between these disciplines."" The audience is the neurophysiologist who needs greater understanding of these complex mathematical concepts and, in general, the book is successful. Only in a few chapters are the writing and the calculus sufficiently complex to overly challenge the reader. Special features in this book include some excellent color illustrations of topographic brain maps as one of the clinical applications of EEG analysis. Another excellent feature is the group of five chapters on source localization, especially the clinical applications of voltage topography and source localization in partial epilepsy. Perhaps the most difficult portions of the book are represented by the chapters on nonlinear dynamical analysis that include discussions of the fractal dimension, delay-timing embedding, estimating correlation dimension, saturation, surrogate-data testing, and, in general, the measures derived from chaos theory as applied to brain activity. The Lyapunov exponents, stationarity, and dynamic changes in relation to clinical events are an attempt to relate these concepts to the patient. As mentioned by one of the authors, ""there is also the promise that nonlinear strategies of data analysis in combination with well-articulated theories will eventually offer possibilities for an enhanced understanding of the nature of the EEG-generating system and its pathological variants.""
Booknews
In light of the emergence of computers, which means that advances in neurophysiology and its clinical application are no longer limited by hard technology but by the availability of mathematical algorithms to process, analyze and interpret signals, mathematicians and neurophysiologists met in Rome in May 1995 to encourage communications between their fields. The 17 resulting papers cover non-linear dynamical analysis, spectral analysis, signal detection, and topography and source localization. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780471969594
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
03/27/1997
Pages:
372
Product dimensions:
6.32(w) x 9.17(h) x 1.03(d)

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