Anatomy of a Single Girl [NOOK Book]

Overview

With Judy Blume-like honesty and insight, this sequel to Anatomy of a Boyfriend is about life after first love--romance, sex, friendship, family, and the ups and downs of life as a single girl.

After everything that happened—my first boyfriend, my first time, my first breakup—jumping back into the dating game seemed like the least healthy thing I could do. It’s not that I didn’t want to fall in love again, since that’s about the best feeling ...

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Anatomy of a Single Girl

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Overview

With Judy Blume-like honesty and insight, this sequel to Anatomy of a Boyfriend is about life after first love--romance, sex, friendship, family, and the ups and downs of life as a single girl.

After everything that happened—my first boyfriend, my first time, my first breakup—jumping back into the dating game seemed like the least healthy thing I could do. It’s not that I didn’t want to fall in love again, since that’s about the best feeling ever. But as a busy college premed still raw from heartbreak, which is the worst feeling ever, I figured I’d lie low for a while. Of course, as soon as I stopped looking for someone, an impossibly amazing—and devastatingly cute—guy came along, and I learned that having a new boyfriend is the quickest way to recover from losing your old one. 
   The moment we got together, all my preconceptions about romance and sex were turned upside down. I discovered physical and emotional firsts I never knew existed. I learned to let go of my past by living in the present. It was thrilling. It was hot. It was just what the doctor ordered.
   But I couldn’t avoid my future forever. 
  
In Daria Snadowsky’s daring follow-up to Anatomy of a Boyfriend, eighteen-year-old Dominique explores the relationship between love and lust, and the friendships that see us through.

“Curious teens will find Snadowsky’s honesty refreshing, and like [Judy Blume’s] Forever before it, this one is sure to be passed from hand to hand.” —Booklist
 
“The book presents a multiplicity of opinions and stories about sex, intimacy and relationships and lets readers come to their own conclusions.” —Kirkus Reviews
 
“Dominique is a strong female character who makes informed decisions and demonstrates control over her own body and goals. . . . This book could be popular with girls who are curious and interested in reading about intimate young adult relationships.” —VOYA
 
“Written in an unflinchingly candid style, Daria Snadowsky’s Anatomy of a Single Girl is an addictive contemporary read.” —MidnightBloomReads.blogspot.com

 “An honest, warts-and-all account of late teen relationships, and it’s unflinching and absorbing.” —Chicklish.co.uk

“Snadowsky knows how to write women—strong, flawed women who are open to discovering their bodies and what makes them feel good. (Whether it’s science or sex.)” —RatherBeReadingblog.com

“[The Anatomy books] could demystify sex for teenaged girls in a way that neither encourages abstinence nor promiscuity, and for that it should be on the shelves of every household.” —ForeverYoungAdult.com
 
“Daria Snadowsky is excellent at writing the awkward teenager. . . . Honest and so realistic.” —TheBookLife.com
 
“Any girl who has ever had [her] heart broken can and will relate to the events taking place in this book.” —DwellInPossibilityBooks.blogspot.com




From the Hardcover edition.
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Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
Gr 9 Up—In this sequel to Anatomy of a Boyfriend (Delacorte, 2007), 18-year-old Dominique Baylor is fresh off her freshman year at Tulane and plans to spend eight weeks with her family at their Fort Myers home. She will work as a hospital volunteer and hang out with her best friend, Amy, hoping that this will help her recover from a recent breakup. She meets Guy Davies, a handsome Ford University junior, and is immediately attracted to him. While both acknowledge the chemistry between them, Dom longs for a level of commitment that Guy does not reciprocate. He makes it clear that he is interested in a summer romance. At first hesitant, Dom decides to go along with the limitations, living for the pleasures of a relationship that has no future. Not surprisingly, she eventually determines that she wants more than a strictly physical relationship, breaks off with Guy, and returns to Tulane a "sadder but wiser" girl. The necessity of having a boyfriend ("No matter what we do, it's always more special if there's a boyfriend to share it with.") is an underlying message. The book contains explicit sexual scenes, raunchy language, and a detailed graphic description of a pelvic exam.—Barbara M. Moon, Suffolk Cooperative Library System, Bellport, NY
Children's Literature - Lois Rubin Gross
Meet the book most likely to be challenged in school and public libraries this year. Unlike its four decades' old predecessor, Forever, this is a book that goes far beyond the boundaries of a girl losing her virginity and telling the tale. In this story of a Florida girl on summer vacation, all romanticism flees in favor of a "sex buddy" (the colloquial term is used) relationship with another college student who has no intention of being anything but a summer fling. Dominique has been on her own at Tulane, and now returns to the parental nest to find that her parents are moving on with their lives, that her best friend plans to commute for week-end hook-ups, and that the handsome guy (literally, his name is Guy) she meets at her hospital internship is interested in a no-strings physical relationship. That is the loose structure of a book that could be placed in fiction or with sex manuals. Author Sandowsky is very graphic about how part "p" fits with part "v," and what the best position is to achieve female orgasm. Because Dom is pre-med, the author is able to introduce a wealth of information about STDs and how to test for them, but it is somewhat doubtful that readers will show the caution Dom does in demanding proof that her partner is clear of disease, or that boys will test as willingly as Guy does. Although Dom concedes she would prefer emotional attachment in a relationship, it is clear that Guy will be only the first of many partners she will have ("How many penises will I have in my vagina?") before she finds her forever relationship. Reviewer: Lois Rubin Gross
Kirkus Reviews
Snadowsky's candid follow-up to Anatomy of a Boyfriend (2007) takes readers through ambitious pre-med Dominique's second sexual relationship. Dominique returns home after her freshman year at Tulane still reeling from her breakup with Wes, her first love and first sexual partner. Dom's best friend, Amy, normally content to hook up without getting emotionally involved, is spending the summer in a long-distance relationship with a boy she met at college. While interning at a hospital, Dom meets Guy, a fraternity brother at a local university, and the two soon become involved. What's the difference between a relationship that might be forever and one that's just for the summer? How does sex affect relationships? What's sex like, anyway? The book's answers are frank, though sometimes didactic or expressed clunkily ("I wonder how many more penises I'll have inside me in my lifetime"). In its best moments, the book presents a multiplicity of opinions and stories about sex, intimacy and relationships and lets readers come to their own conclusions. Some options, however, are still off the table: All the main characters are heterosexual, and masturbation is only ever depicted as weird or tragic. A mixed bag, but the blunt sex talk fills a niche. (Fiction. 14-18)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780375897375
  • Publisher: Random House Children's Books
  • Publication date: 1/8/2013
  • Sold by: Random House
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 240
  • Sales rank: 96,561
  • Age range: 14 - 17 Years
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

DARIA SNADOWSKY lives and practices criminal defense law in Southern Nevada. She is the author of acclaimed Anatomy of a Boyfriend and contributed an essay to the anthologyCrush: 26 Real-life Tales of First Love (Harlequin, 2011). 
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 21 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(8)

4 Star

(3)

3 Star

(7)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(1)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 21 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 17, 2013

    Love it kate

    It is just for girls and you should look and read it

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 18, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Anatomy of a Single Girl is the sequel to Anatomy of a Boyfriend

    Anatomy of a Single Girl is the sequel to Anatomy of a Boyfriend. Daria Snadowsky takes a serious subject and adds a twist of humor to it, keeping the responsible outlook on sex forefront. I loved to see every teenager read this novel. I'm sure if teens did, the backseat of a car would be seen in a different light. I also wish girls would ask guys to do what Dominique did when faced with the decision to have sex with a guy.

    Dominique (Dom) is coming home for summer vacation after her first year in college. She’s still not over her break up with Wes. For Dom, when she fell in love with Wes, it was supposed to be forever. But this summer, Dom is going to learn about love, passion, and friendship. And a gorgeous guy named Guy is going to be the one who helps Dom see she’s not as black and white as she thought she was. That sometimes life is just gray.

    Anatomy of a Single Girl is a wonderful, heart felt story about Dom's sexual relationships, but it's also about her relationship with her parents, Amy her girlfriend, and the three guys in her life: Wes, the guy she fell in love with that broke her heart. Guy, who teaches her passion. And Calvin, who teaches her about friendship, and that hugs are really underrated. But most of all, she teaches herself that being a single girl is not being an inadequate person. That being single is okay!

    I highly recommend Anatomy of a Single Girl as an awesome read for teen girls as well as teen boys, but it's not just for the teens. Everyone will enjoy and fall in love with Dom's story.



    My favorite quotes:

    “Can you write back for me ‘Sweet dreams’?”
    Amy smirks naughtily. “Sure…but can I leave out the first s and an e?”
    “Huh?” I picture it in my mind: Wet dreams.

    The moment we got together still ranks as the most magical in my life, though I should’ve taken the Porta Potti as a sign of where things would end up.

    Amy then demands “a visual.” Guy has already friended me on Facebook, so I pull up his profile photo on my phone.
    “Holy hotness! Break me off a piece of that!”

    The only thing that replicates it is the vibrator I bought when he started camp. It’s much better than the wand massager I used before. Bit’s still not as fun as actually being with him—“
    “Thank you for those lovely images.”

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 28, 2013

    Its a good book

    Its in my top maybe 50

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 17, 2013

    IT SUCKS I AM SORRY OK WHO EVERY U R

    It really sucks

    1 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 13, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    Caution:  recommended for ages 16+ due to sexual content.  This

    Caution:  recommended for ages 16+ due to sexual content.  This sequel to "Anatomy of a Boyfriend" opens as Dominique finishes her first year of college and returns to her family home for vacation.  Her BFF Calvin has hinted he wants more to their relationship but Dom is still reeling from being dumped by Wes in the first book so she plans to forget about men this summer.  Then she meets Wes, a frat boy who breaks her resolve.  Many sexual encounter occur, with lots of language appropriate for her situation but that may not be appropriate for young teen readers.  It is probably aimed at the New Adult reader, those between the ages of 18 and 24 or so.  The author does a good job of giving enough information about the first book to make this title work as a stand-alone.  Mature teen readers may enjoy the book but I did not.

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  • Posted May 9, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    Dom is in college now, and she's still getting over her heartbre

    Dom is in college now, and she's still getting over her heartbreak. She finds a rebound guy, who I really liked. I hope we haven't seen the last of him. Dom's character had some tremendous growth within this story. She is figuring herself out. Like book one, there was a lot of sex, and I felt like it took away from the story at times. Calvin is a doll too. I would love to see that friendship grow into something more, but it doesn't look promising at this point. Dom came to terms with a lot in this book, and it didn't just have to do with Wes. She's growing up.

    Anatomy of a Single Girl by Daria Snadowsky was kindly provided to me by the author for review. The opinions are my own.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 14, 2014

    You don't need to have read the first book to get this one thoug

    You don't need to have read the first book to get this one though I recommend it. 

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2014

    Finally Domminique learns to move on

    I thought Domminique was bratty and needy the was also too attached to so many people at soooooo many different times

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 26, 2013

    A year after she's dumped by her first boyfriend, Dominique Bayl

    A year after she's dumped by her first boyfriend, Dominique Baylor, now a pre-med major at Tulane, is officially single--and not at all sure how to feel about it. Then she meets Guy, an attractive physics student who's as nerdy about science as she is. When they decide to have a summer fling (each agreeing to go their separate ways in the fall), Dom finds out just how complicated &quot;no strings attached&quot; relationships can be.<br />
    <br />
    Anatomy of a Single Girl is the follow-up to Anatomy of a Boyfriend, a novel that deals with first-time relationships (and all the baggage that comes with them). Single Girl, on the other hand, debunks more advanced issues like sexual health and non-traditional girl/guy relationships. Although the novel works as a whole, there are some scenes that read more like a primer on sexual health and gynecology visits than as a work of fiction. Despite this, however, the novel's message itself is enough reason to check it out: it's perfectly okay for a guy to remain a friend. Recommended for Ages 16-18 for sexual content.

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  • Posted September 10, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Anatomy of a Single Girl is the sequel to Anatomy of a Boyfriend

    Anatomy of a Single Girl is the sequel to Anatomy of a Boyfriend (2008) and finds Dom, now in college, heading home for a break. The book picks up a short while after the ending of the first book and continues with the exploration and metamorphosis of a single girl with a broken heart.

    Right of the bat it’s safe to say that didn’t quite love the first novel, but I still enjoyed it. It was blunt, it was interesting, and yes—it was sexy in some parts. The sequel is very much the same though I can say I enjoyed this one a bit more. There were some parts where Dom irritated me a bit and others that had me agreeing or relating to how she acted. I think what detracted from the story here, for me at least, was that I was waiting for Dom to go all out and have fun. For the most part she stayed in a singular repeated setting, never doing anything exciting until just before the end. I understand heartbreak to the fullest extent, however after reading more than enough pages of her sulking around about her ex, it got a little irritating. I would have liked her to have forgotten that loser early on and had fun, or explore the cute as heck thing going on at the beginning of the book with Calvin that was pretty much abandoned for another storyline with Guy that fell flat.

    While reading I also discovered some things to be over-detailed and others to be under-detailed. Perhaps I’ve been spoiled over the past few months with other novels, but I feel like the sex scenes were a little too abrupt and didn’t quite have enough passion—then again it shows how realistic this book is by showing a more practical approach to sex. (Hey, not everyone gets the rose petals, candles, and sensual R&amp;B music playing in the background.) But then there were other things that provided too-much detail, such as what I can only imagine to be an accurate account of a pap smear procedure, nearly step-by-step.

    It is incredibly evident that the author is not one to shy away from saying what needs to be said, being as brutally honest as possible, and really giving it to you straight to paint a realistic story. This is definitely worth commending as it is an incredible challenge to be so dauntless. There is such detail behind Dom’s field and obvious love and dedication behind the creation and execution of each character.

    (Minor Spoiler Ahead)

    If only this book revolved around Calvin and Dom’s story I may have ended up liking it a lot more than I did. Or maybe it’s because after reading the first, I really wanted Dom to finally end up with someone who was worth it.

    If you are looking for a realistic novel of firsts, seconds, and what comes after then this series may be right up your alley. However, if you’re a bit more like me and like those happily ever afters, then you may be a tad bit disappointed here.
    READ MY REVIEW OF ‘ANATOMY OF A BOYFRIEND’ HERE

    *I would like to thank Daria Snadowsky for sending me a finished copy of this novel in exchange for an honest review!*

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  • Posted August 6, 2013

    I really enjoyed Anatomy of a Boyfriend, so as soon as I finishe

    I really enjoyed Anatomy of a Boyfriend, so as soon as I finished it, I began reading the companion novel Anatomy of a Single Girl. I was just really excited to read more about Dominique (or, Dom for short). While the ending of Anatomy of a Boyfriend was good, I still wanted to know what Dom will do after all the events. I was very happy to find that Snadowsky's Anatomy of a Single Girl was an excellent read. I absolutely LOVED it, and I think maybe it was even better than Boyfriend.
    Anatomy of a Single Girl was set in Dom's hometown during her summer after her freshman year of college. After having broken up with her first love Wes, all Dom wanted to do was lie low and move on--or in other words, get back into her routine of being single and lonely. Then, alas, a super cute guy named Guy comes along, and Dom experienced love once again. But this relationship with Guy was very different from her previous one with Wes. With Guy, Dom decided to live in the present and forget the future, and for a while, all was well and exciting. However, the future was inevitable and unavoidable, and Dom came face to face with it, along with who she was and what love truly means.
    I was so happy to see how much Dominique had grown from Anatomy of a Boyfriend. After being so naive, curious, and confused about everything, in Anatomy of a Single, Dom was much more mature, strong, and content. Her growth as a character was especially evident in the way she narrated Anatomy of a Single Girl. Her character's voice was different--more fluid and focused, which communicated how she has grown up since Boyfriend. I rooted for Dom all throughout the novel; I laughed and I cried with her as she tried to figure out love and all its ways of being found, felt, broken, and mended.
    I also really liked how I got to read more of Dominique and Amy's friendship in Anatomy of a Single Girl. Unlike in Anatomy of a Boyfriend, Amy, Dom's best friend, really took part in the plot and in helping Dom cope with her heartbreak. I loved getting to know her character more. Seeing Dom and Amy be so loyal and understanding toward each other despite whatever differences they may have or (boy) problems they may face was really touching. After reading Snadowsky's Anatomy novels and getting to relate to both Dom and Amy, I feel as if they were like my friends too--friends who I can go to to talk about anything of the most awkward-est subjects. I wish they were real and I'm glad I met them. I missed them after the book ended.
    From the first book Anatomy of a Boyfriend, Anatomy of a Single Girl continues Dom's story of firsts, but this time around, it's about how she had moved on from her first heart break. I'm really glad to have read these books by Daria Snadowsky. The candid-ness and authenticity of both her Anatomy books put a lot of things about love, life, and people into perspective for me. Often in YA novels, first loves are portrayed as a happily-ever-after, forever kind of love and more often than not, in real life, that's not true at all. Most first loves end. I like how that was shown in the Anatomy books.
    Anatomy of a Boyfriend and Anatomy of a Single Girl are standalone books; you can enjoy Single Girl without reading Boyfriend. BUT, I highly recommend you read both books to better appreciate either. I especially recommend Snadowsky's books to my fellow teens, but anyone can and should read them--both novels offer great insight told in a buoyant and readable (yet honest) manner.
    **Originally posted on Michelle &amp; Leslie's Book Picks book blog.

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  • Posted July 8, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    It's a journey into the beginnings of adulthood!

    In Anatomy Of A Single Girl, she's finally come into her own. Where she's hesitant and immature and inexperienced in the first book, she's much more sure of who she is and what she wants. Ultimately, this book is the journey of a girl becoming a woman, a girl who's learning to find herself.
    Dom and Wes' relationship is over and she's finally learned to be okay with that. What I really appreciated was that Dom didn't just shack up with any guy in an effort to get over her ex. It would've been easy to go down that route, however, it would've felt forced. Dom's got an awareness of what she wants and what she doesn't want and she sticks to her guns through to the end. Instead, she meets a new guy and goes into exploratory mode with a purely casual, summer romance for a change. Snadowsky didn't hold back on the steamy details and she amps up the swoon factor into high gear here. I guess my main problem with this book was that Dom had a tendency to revert back to being totally needy in her relationship with Guy. I was really hoping that she'd outgrown all that and learned from her past experience, but instead she teaches us that, yes, sometimes old habits do die hard. But it definitely got annoying, especially when she grew so childish about her parents' decision to move out of her childhood home. But, yeah, this book definitely keeps with the authentic vibe that the first one had. Even when it comes to the sex stuff, Dom is experimenting with new moves and is learning how to fully explore her body. The tone isn't solely kinky as you'd expect it might be, it's still awkward and imperfect. Snadowsky is a pro at capturing the adolescent experience in a completely authentic way! We're taught that old wounds aren't easily healed but it is possible to pick yourself up and move on. And that's essentially the theme to the whole book. Dom's learned to do just that and though there are a few set-backs along the way, it's not altogether impossible. The book is a journey into the beginnings of adulthood as you learn who you are and what kind of person you want to be. It's an exploratory journey, one that is utterly satisfying and a great read for college kids.

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  • Posted April 14, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    After reading the first novel in author Daria Snadowsky¿s, Anato

    After reading the first novel in author Daria Snadowsky’s, Anatomy series I’ve gotta admit that I was a bit nervous to start reading. The last novel was full of sex. Like lots and lots of sex and I had to admit that I was hesitant because I didn’t really enjoy having to skim over chapters because they made me all awkward. While there still is a ton of sexual stuff I have to say that I liked Anatomy of a Single Girl more than the novel that came before it.

    Anatomy of a Single Girl takes place when Dominique comes home for the summer from University. She’s reunited with her best friend Amy and is currently living at home with her parents. Then she ends up meeting the broad shouldered and incredibly smart (and attractive) Guy who quickly becomes the highlight of her summer. But Dominique is still recovering from her last break-up with Wes, but Guy slowly begins to fill up the space that Wes once held in her heart. As Dominique enters her second relationship she comes to understand that what she has with Guy will not last forever and that its expiration date is when the summer is up. During the brief period of time that Dominique and Guy have together she ends up learning the difference between a real relationship and the type she has with Guy while also finding how to make peace with her break-up with Wes.

    I’ve already brought up how nervous I was about the novel especially since in the last novel I felt that Dominique got taken advantage of a ton of times by her boyfriend (probably because she was blinded by her emotions and all). Thankfully in Anatomy of a Single Girl Dominique is no longer the same character that she once was in the past novel, she actually says “no” when a boy tries to go too far with her and thinks situations through and stands up for what she believes in instead of twisting herself for other people. A nice change that made me like Dominique, however I will forever disagree with her freaking out on Guy for not believing that most relationships that teenagers and young adults have will last forever. Because really… hormones… and that’s coming from a teenager…

    In the novel Dominique and Guy still do a lot of sex and stuff, but where the last novel had a lot of graphic content I felt that Anatomy of a Single Girl really toned it down. There was more hinting at things happening and the descriptions were vague (thank gawd). Forgetting all of that stuff and getting into the plot, I think that there is a lot of character growth for Dominique and that really is what the novel focuses on ( that and Dominique suddenly  wanting to do ‘it’ a lot more with Guy after one turn of events). Personally I felt that I had a lot of trouble relating with the novel during the scenes where Dominique did experience character growth. With her being in university and talking about the perils of it and the trouble that comes with boys, I was really distant from the plot. This is definitely because of my four year age difference with the main character and I’ll say right now that I don’t think high school students that are anywhere except their final year or so will be able to relate.

    After everything that does happen in the novel, I’m unsure if there will be a sequel but I wouldn’t be surprised if there is one. There’s still a few plot holes left open and I’m sure that a ton of fans of the series want to see them tied up.

    I’d recommend this series to a more mature YA crowd, readers who are looking for a teen-drama and to young readers that are experiencing young love.

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  • Posted February 15, 2013

    After waiting 7 years!

    This book was just as amazing as the first one ( Anatomy of a Boyfriend) . It only took me one whole day to read the second book! I loved it! It's a great read, great storyline and great writing! If you want to read a cute, funny , love able story well this is a book for you. But you should read the first one so your not lost on what is going on.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 9, 2013

    Is this book any good??

    Is this book any good??

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 31, 2013

    Hghnbjjjgghhhhgggyvhvhvhvtcrxrtcgvhvyvyvyvyvyvyvyyvyvyvyvyvyvhvyvyyyvhvyvhyvyvyyvyvyvycxexexextbjbuyghggyfdhdfhcgvhctfgbfyvghcthdrdsggjdeffsvwfsfgddgffffdddddddddddewwwwwwssdsssssssssssssdsssdsdddeeeedddddddhfgcgdhsgdvfrdrtvtvttvtvtctctctctctcttcctyb

    I really wanted to see how many letters would fit. :o)

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 31, 2013

    Ok

    It is good but weird

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 5, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 8, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 20, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 21 Customer Reviews

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