×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

The Ancient City: Life in Classical Athens and Rome
     

The Ancient City: Life in Classical Athens and Rome

5.0 2
by Peter Connolly, Hazel Dodge
 

See All Formats & Editions

In this superbly illustrated volume, Athens and Rome, the greatest cities of antiquity, spring to life. By recreating the public buildings, temples, shops, and houses of these mighty civilizations, Connolly reveals every aspect of a person's life in glorious detail, including food, drama, religion, games, and the baths. 500 color illustrations.

Overview

In this superbly illustrated volume, Athens and Rome, the greatest cities of antiquity, spring to life. By recreating the public buildings, temples, shops, and houses of these mighty civilizations, Connolly reveals every aspect of a person's life in glorious detail, including food, drama, religion, games, and the baths. 500 color illustrations.

Editorial Reviews

KLIATT
This book is a magnificent combination of text and illustration, undoubtedly the best of its kind on this topic. What makes it such a success is the authors' understanding of how ancient cities were constructed, what they contained. This knowledge is combined with an ability to illustrate this understanding in a manner that rivals David Macaulay. The cutaway drawing of the Parthenon on p.73 is a good example of this. One finds such drawings in many books on ancient cities and on classical Greek architecture. The two drawings on this page rival any that one will find anywhere. Even more impressive is the "exploded drawing" of the north-east corner of the Parthenon, which breaks up the architectural components into parts that are identified separately (e.g., acroterion, triglyphs, metopes, architrave, etc.). Again, this kind of illustration of the Parthenon's architecture is attempted in other books, but not as effectively as it is in this one. The accompanying photographs of the Parthenon are similarly excellent in quality, and noteworthy for the understanding they portray of the monument. For example, there is a beautiful photograph on p. 68 of the southeast corner of the Parthenon that shows its unfinished state, with knobby stone projections (for handling) left on the wall. Some of the illustrations in this book do say a thousand words. The accompanying text is fairly dense but quite accessible for the general reader. It is hard to imagine a better book on the ancient city, or one that is as comprehensive. The chapters on Athens include politics, daily life, the economy, domestic architecture, religious buildings, religious celebrations, and drama. For Rome there are chapters on thecity's early history, on its law and civil service, on aqueducts and ports, on domestic architecture, on daily life, commerce, religion and worship, chariot racing, drama, gladiatorial games, the great palace of Domitian, Trajanic architecture, and the baths. Recommended for every secondary school and public library. KLIATT Codes: JSA*—Exceptional book, recommended for junior and senior high school students, advanced students, and adults. 1998, Oxford Univ. Press, 256p, illus, bibliog, index, 28cm, $18.95. Ages 13 to adult. Reviewer: John Rosser; Professor, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA, July 2000 (Vol. 34 No. 4)
School Library Journal
Gr 9 Up-For anyone assigned a report on the design, construction, and use of the Parthenon or the Roman Colosseum, it would be hard to find a better source than this one. The full-page color drawings are stunning and include a wealth of detail not often found in other sources. Readers may not be aware, for example, of the lively use of color that prevailed on Greek temples and sculpture, but it is well portrayed here. Numerous photographs and reproductions also illustrate the text. The daily life, history, and architecture of Athens and Rome are extensively covered, in more detail than most students will be able to absorb. Advanced readers with a background in ancient history may find some interesting topics for in-depth research. An up-to-date bibliography and a useful index are appended.-David N. Pauli, Missoula Public Library, MT
Kirkus Reviews
Strewn with minutely detailed cityscapes, cutaway views, and interiors, this hefty urban study recaptures the architectural glories of two great cities in their heydays, with as much specific information as assignment-driven readers or browsers could want. In a substantial text providing plenty of historical background, aided by a blizzard of sharp, full-color photos of artifacts and classical art, Connolly (Pompeii, 1990) and Dodge examine both cities' major and minor buildings, from Bronze Age remnants through the aftermath of the Persian War (for Athens) and the great fire of a.d. 64. (for Rome), also describing government, legal systems, religious ceremonies, theater and other public amusements, fashion, daily life for people of all classes, food, water, and waste disposal. More debatable or speculative reconstructions are noted as such. Equally suited to casual readers or serious study, this takes a giant step past the Eyewitness-filled cheap seats and even beyond David Macaulay territory. (maps, diagrams, glossary, bibliography, index) (Nonfiction. 12-16)

From the Publisher
"A fascinating, close-up picture of what daily life was like for the inhabitants of the two most celebrated cities of the Western Classical Age. Private houses, public spaces, city streets, shops, restaurants, Greek temples, Roman baths, clothing, hairdos, utensils, customs, beliefs, manners, and mores are among the many areas that Connolly covers.... Lucid, succinct, easy-to-follow, and the hundreds of illustrations—photographs, maps, drawings, and diagrams—are attractive and very much to the point."—The Christian Science Monitor

"Strewn with minutely detailed cityscapes, cutaway views, and interiors, this hefty urban study recaptures the architectural glories of two great cities in their heydays.... Equally suited to casual readers or serious study."—Kirkus Reviews (pointer review)

"Remarkable... The elaborate maps and lavish illustrations that grace every page most vividly communicate the tenor and the texture of classical antiquity.... A superior historical, sociological, and architectural survey."—Booklist

"Peter Connolly's eminent reputation as an archaeological illustrator can only be enhanced by this superb book... He has made two great civilizations come alive on the page.... If you want to know exactly what it looked like when Socrates attended the famous Symposium with Agathon and Aristophanes, or what Suetonius saw when he described Nero's Golden House, this is the book to tell you."—Times Educational Supplement

"A fascinating, close-up picture of what daily life was like for the inhabitants of the two most celebrated cities of the Western Classical Age. Private houses, public spaces, city streets, shops, restaurants, Greek temples, Roman baths, clothing, hairdos, utensils, customs, beliefs, manners, and mores are among the many areas that Connolly covers.... Lucid, succinct, easy-to-follow, and the hundreds of illustrations—photographs, maps, drawings, and diagrams—are attractive and very much to the point."—The Christian Science Monitor

"Focuses on the development and growth of each city, with superb, colorful illustrations that help the reader visualize all aspects of life and building construction." — Dig!

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780195214093
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Publication date:
07/01/1998
Pages:
256
Product dimensions:
8.70(w) x 10.90(h) x 1.00(d)
Age Range:
10 Years

Meet the Author

Peter Connolly is one of the foremost writers and illustrators on the subject of the ancient world. He is an Honorary Research Fellow of the Institute of Archaeology, London, and has studied at the British School in Athens and in Rome. Co-author Hazel Dodge is a scholar of international reputation, known for her publications on Roman architecture and construction.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Ancient City: Life in Classical Athens and Rome 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
manirul01 More than 1 year ago
Amazing.....!Excellent......!Just enjoy it.....!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book, in my opinion, is the pinnacle upon which other like books will be based. The book come to life with incredible pictures and the text is not only readable, but very exiting, detailed, and informative even for an expert on the subject of ancient cities and their aspects. Peter Connolly's expertise in the subjecst of History, architecture, and archaeology are clearly show as he litterally covers all three in his explanation and analysis of Athens and Rome. Every time I read it or just pick it up to look at a certain section of the book I learn something and at the same time realize how much I have learned.