Ancient Pagan and Modern Christian Symbolism (Illustrated) [NOOK Book]

Overview

THE demand which has sprung up for this work has induced the Author to make it more complete than it was originally. But it could not be made perfect without being expanded into a volume whose size would be incompatible with cheapness. When every Figure would supply a text for a long discourse, a close attention is required lest a description should be developed into a dissertation. In this work, the Author is obliged to confine himself to the explanation of symbols, and cannot launch out into ancient and modern ...
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Ancient Pagan and Modern Christian Symbolism (Illustrated)

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Overview

THE demand which has sprung up for this work has induced the Author to make it more complete than it was originally. But it could not be made perfect without being expanded into a volume whose size would be incompatible with cheapness. When every Figure would supply a text for a long discourse, a close attention is required lest a description should be developed into a dissertation. In this work, the Author is obliged to confine himself to the explanation of symbols, and cannot launch out into ancient and modern faiths, except in so far as they are typified by the use of certain conventional signs.

A great many who peruse a book like this for the first time, and find how strange were the ideas which for some thousands of years permeated the religious opinions of the civilized world, might naturally consider that the Author is a mere visionary one who is possessed of a hobby that he rides to death. Such a notion is strengthened by finding that there is scarcely any subject treated of except the one which associates religion, a matter of the highest aim to man, with ideas of the most intensely earthly kind. But a thoughtful reader will readily discern that an essay on Symbolism must be confined to visible emblems. By no fair means can an author who makes the crucifix his text introduce the subject of the Confessional, the Eucharist, or
Extreme Unction. Nor can one, who knows that Buddha and Jesus alike inaugurated a faith which was unmarked by visible symbolism, bring into an interpretation of emblems a comparison between the preaching of two such distinguished men. In like manner, the Author is obliged to pass over the difference between Judaism, Christianity as propounded by the son of Mary, and that which passes current for Christianity in Rome and most countries of Europe.
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940015526738
  • Publisher: Balefire Publishing
  • Publication date: 10/1/2012
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 245
  • File size: 9 MB

Meet the Author

Thomas Inman (1820–1876) was a house-surgeon to the Liverpool Royal Infirmary. In his lifetime he had numerous medical papers published. Perhaps most notably, however, he was an amateur mythologist, and as such had several non-medical papers published, including Ancient Pagan and Modern Christian Symbolism, first published in 1869 and then again in 1875.

In Ancient Pagan and Modern Christian Symbolism, Inman elucidates the origins of some popularly-used symbols, some of them medical. Many of the symbols he discusses are recognizable even today.

Born on 27 January 1820, in Rutland Street, Leicester, he was second son of Charles Inman, a partner in Pickford's carrying company, and later director of the Bank of Liverpool; William Inman was his younger brother. Thomas went to school at Wakefield, and in 1836 was apprenticed to his uncle, Richard Inman, M.D., at Preston, Lancashire. He entered King's College, London, where he graduated M.B. in 1842 and M.D. in 1844 at the University of London.

Declining a commission as an army surgeon, Inman settled in Liverpool as house-surgeon to the Royal Infirmary. He obtained a good practice as a physician, and was for many years physician to the Royal Infirmary.

In 1871 he gave up practice and retired to Clifton, near Bristol, where he died on 3 May 1876. He was a man of handsome presence, and his genial temperament made him generally popular.

Inman's publications on personal hygiene are practical advice. On 21 October 1844 he became a member of the Literary and Philosophical Society of Liverpool, to whose Proceedings he contributed papers, mainly on archæological subjects. He read widely, was no scholar, but wrote with ingenuity. From Godfrey Higgins he derived the suggestion that the key to all mythology is to be sought in phallic worship. On 5 February 1866 he first propounded this theory in a paper on The Antiquity of certain Christian and other Names. The subject was pursued in other papers, and in three works on Ancient Faiths, which he published between 1868 and 1876.
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Customer Reviews

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( 12 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 14 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 7, 2013

    Wha Wha?

    How can there be 10 reviews without there being a single one which shows (previous to this eleventh one, of course)

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 28, 2014

    &#2200-&#2249

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2014

    Oh he was born again but not as you hope

    He shall help rule with the dark lord

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 15, 2013

    Don Inaccurate in every way

    Using the pagan symbolism of Catholics to disavow God our Creator and Savior is the work of the devil. I hope this author was born again before he died, or he will be judged for this stumbling block of a book.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 26, 2011

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    Posted May 15, 2011

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    Posted March 11, 2011

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    Posted May 13, 2011

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    Posted February 4, 2011

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    Posted April 8, 2011

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