Ancient Rome: A New History

Ancient Rome: A New History

by David Potter
     
 

ISBN-10: 0500287864

ISBN-13: 9780500287866

Pub. Date: 06/29/2009

Publisher: Thames & Hudson

A highly readable new history of Rome from its origins to the reign of Justinian.  See more details below

Overview

A highly readable new history of Rome from its origins to the reign of Justinian.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780500287866
Publisher:
Thames & Hudson
Publication date:
06/29/2009
Edition description:
Older Edition
Pages:
352
Product dimensions:
7.50(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.70(d)

Table of Contents

Notes to the Reader 8

Introduction: Methods and Sources 9

Early Rome 9

The Early Republic 11

The Late Republic and Early Empire 12

The Third and Fourth Centuries AD 14

The End of Empire 16

Sources in Other Languages 18

I The Formation of the Roman Identity (800-350 BC) 19

The First Roman Communities 24

The Roman Story of Early Roman History 24

Earliest Rome 27

Early Political Structures 29

Domestic and Intellectual World of Early Rome 33

Definitions 33

Life Expectancy, Marriage, and Values 34

Religion: Family and State 36

Religion and Foreign Relations 40

Rome in the Sixth Century BC 41

The Servian Constitution 43

Kings and Magistrates 45

The Emergence of the Roman Republic 47

Patricians and Plebeians 49

The Twelve Tables 51

The Licinian-Sextian Laws 53

Summary 56

II War and Empire (350-133 BC) 57

Rome and the Latins 60

The Cassian Treaty 61

The Relationship with the Latins after 337 BC 61

The Doctrine of Decisive Victory 63

The Wars of the Third Century BC 65

Why Did Rome Fight? 73

The Militarism of the Third Century BC 73

Technical Prowess 79

The Empire: Patrons and Clients 82

Provinces 82

Patronage 84

Taxes 85

The Wars of the Second Century BC 87

The Defeat of the Macedonian Kingdoms 87

The Empire in 133 BC 93

The Consequences of Empire 94

Culture 94

Italy and the Empire 99

Slavery 101

Summary 104

III The Failure of the Roman Republic (133-59 BC) 105

The Gracchi (133-121 BC) 110

Tiberius Gracchus no

Gaius Gracchus 113

Popular Sovereignty and Senatorial Control (121-100 BC) 117

The Suppression of Popular Sovereignty 117

The Restoration of Popular Sovereignty 121

The Age of Sulla (100-78 BC) 124

The War with the Italians 124

Sulla: The Reactionary Revolutionary 129

Life after Sulla (78-59 BC) 135

The Professionalization of the Roman Army 135

Pompey 140

Cicero and Caesar 143

Summary 148

IV The Transition from Republic to Principate (59 BC-AD 70) 149

Explaining the Change 152

The Domination of Caesar (59-44 BC) 153

Culture in the Age of Caesar 153

Caesar and Pompey 158

Octavianus and Antony (44-31 BC) 168

Caesar's Heir (44-43 BC) 168

The Era of the Triumvirs (43-31 BC) 170

The Fall of the Republic 175

The House of Augustus (31 BC-AD 14) 173

The Creation of a New Order 178

Augustus and Roman Culture 182

The Succession (12 BC-AD 14) 186

The Empire at the Death of Augustus 190

Eccentric Stability: The Successors to Augustus (AD 14-69) 193

Tiberius (AD 14-37) 193

Caligula and Claudius (AD 37-54) 197

Nero (AD 54-68) 201

The Year of the Four Emperors (AD 69) 204

Summary 208

V The Age of Stability (AD 70-238) 209

New Dynasties (AD 70-180) 214

The Flavians (AD 70-96) 214

Nerva, Trajan, and Hadrian (AD 96-138) 217

The Antonines (AD 138-80) 224

Imperial Culture 227

The Contemporaries of Tacitus 227

Spectacle and Culture 233

Religion and Culture 237

Running the Roman Empire 241

Emperors and Their Officials 241

Emperors and Their Subjects 245

The Roman Army 253

An Age of Rust and Iron (AD 180-238) 258

Commodus (AD 180-92) 258

Septimius Severus (AD 193-211) 260

The Successors of Severus (AD 211-38) 264

Summary 270

VI The Transformation of the Roman World (AD 238-410) 271

Third-century Crises (ad238-70) 275

Bureaucrats and Emperors 275

New Enemies? 277

Barbarian Ascendancy (AD 238-70) 279

The Restoration of the Empire (AD 270-305) 284

Aurelian and His Successors (AD 270-84) 284

Diocletian (AD 284-305) 286

Constantine and His Empire (AD 306-37) 295

The Rise to Power (AD 306-12) 295

The Conversion of Constantine (AD 312) 297

Licinius (AD 313-24) 300

Constantine and the Empire (AD 324-37) 301

The Struggle for Control (AD 337-410) 305

Constantius II and Julian (AD 337-63) 305

Bureaucratic Backlash and Barbarian Invasion (AD 363-95) 311

Stilicho and Alaric (AD 395-410) 316

Summary 320

VII The Endings of the Roman Empire (AD 410-642) 321

The Course of Events (AD 410-642) 324

Barbarians and Emperors from Alaric to Geiseric (AD 410-77) 324

Eastern Emperors and Western Kings from Theodosius II to Justinian (AD 408-527) 329

The Vision of Justinian (AD 527-65) 332

The World of Heraclius and Umar (AD 565-642) 337

Economic and Social Changes 341

Explaining Decline 352

Summary 354

Glossary 355

Recommended Reading 361

Acknowledgments 364

Sources of Illustrations 365

Index 365

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