Ancient Society / Edition 1

Paperback (Print)
Buy Used
Buy Used from BN.com
$16.57
(Save 38%)
Item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging.
Condition: Used – Good details
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $5.86
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 78%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (12) from $5.86   
  • New (5) from $21.43   
  • Used (7) from $5.86   

Overview

Lewis Henry Morgan studied the American Indian way of life and collected an enormous amount of factual material on the history of primitive-communal society. All the conclusions he draws are based on these facts; where he lacks them, he reasons back on the basis of the data available to him. He determined the periodization of primitive society by linking each of the periods with the development of production techniques. The "great sequence of inventions and discoveries;” and the history of institutions, with each of its three branches — family, property and government — constitute the progress made by human society from its earliest stages to the beginning of civilization. Mankind gained this progress through 'the gradual evolution of their mental and moral powers through experience, and of their protracted struggle with opposing obstacles while winning their way to civilization.'

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
<:st>Reprint of the 1877 edition (which is cited in ) with a new introduction by Robin Fox. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780816509249
  • Publisher: University of Arizona Press
  • Publication date: 5/1/1985
  • Series: Classics of Anthropology
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 560
  • Sales rank: 1,074,429
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 1.50 (d)

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 20, 2000

    Pivotal Work in Anthropology and Cultural Evolutionary Theory

    Lewis Henry Morgan could be considered an enlightened anthropologist. Most important in this work is the theoretical concept of cultural evolution. LHM attributed evolution to the progress of family type development, which in turn influenced political structure, religion and cultural advancement. Most of his theory stems for his long involvement with the Iroquois (he was an adopted member of one of the tribes) Confederacy. Although he did not speak in terms of modes of production or population pressures, the implications are clearly seen in his descriptions of the growth and development of concentrated areas of population and accompanying advancement of production techniques. This work should be revisited and LHM be given the credit as the father of American Anthropology. LHM's influence down to this day has been considerable. Unfortunately he fell from grace because of the use of this volume by Marx and Engles in their theories on pre-capitalistic economic evolution. The largest problem is LHM's over emphasis on religious (divine) influences and the impossibility of full modern cultural status without conversion to Christianity. If you can put aside the religious bias and 19th Century misconcepts of intelligence and cranial evolution being linked to cultural advancement, his general theories and systemic approach to the study of anthropology should continue to be a foundation for all graduate anthropologists today.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)