...and a hard rain fell (20th Anniversary Edition)

( 10 )

Overview

"A magnetic, bloody, moving, and worm's-eye view of soldiering in Vietnam, an account that is from the first page to last a wound that can never heal. A searing gift to his country."-Kirkus Reviews

The classic Vietnam war memoir, ...and a hard rain fell is the unforgettable story of a veteran's rage and the unflinching portrait of a young soldier's odyssey from the roads of upstate New York to the jungles of Vietnam. Updated for its 20th anniversary with a new afterword on the Iraq War and its parallels to ...

See more details below
Paperback (Anniversar)
$13.05
BN.com price
(Save 23%)$16.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (31) from $1.99   
  • New (6) from $1.99   
  • Used (25) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

"A magnetic, bloody, moving, and worm's-eye view of soldiering in Vietnam, an account that is from the first page to last a wound that can never heal. A searing gift to his country."-Kirkus Reviews

The classic Vietnam war memoir, ...and a hard rain fell is the unforgettable story of a veteran's rage and the unflinching portrait of a young soldier's odyssey from the roads of upstate New York to the jungles of Vietnam. Updated for its 20th anniversary with a new afterword on the Iraq War and its parallels to Vietnam, John Ketwig's message is as relevant today as it was twenty years ago.

"Solidly effective. He describes with ingenuous energy and authentic language that time and place."-Library Journal

"Perhaps as evocative of that awful time in Vietnam as the great fictions...a wild surreal account, at its best as powerful as Celine's darkling writing of World War One."-Washington Post

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781402210358
  • Publisher: Sourcebooks, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 1/1/2008
  • Edition description: Anniversar
  • Edition number: 20
  • Pages: 400
  • Sales rank: 686,374
  • Product dimensions: 5.20 (w) x 7.70 (h) x 1.30 (d)

Meet the Author

John Ketwig was sent to Vietnam in September 1967 and completed his tour a year later. His account was originally published in 1985 to tremendous acclaim. John currently lives in New Jersey with his wife, Carolynn.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction

I. The Draft, the Decisions, and The Nam II. Thailand and The World III. The Aftermath

Illustrations Afterword Acknowledgments About the Author

John Ketwig was sent to Vietnam in September 1967 and completed his tour a year later. His account was originally published in 1985 to tremendous acclaim. John currently lives in New Jersey with his wife, Carolynn.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 10 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(3)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(4)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 18, 2013

    Found the book hard to read, seems like a lot of fiction and exa

    Found the book hard to read, seems like a lot of fiction and exaggeration. I spent almost 2 years in Vietnam (The Nam never heard that term before) May be it had to do with being drunk or stoned that such wild stories are told. Sorry it did not fit my time in Vietnam.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 29, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Well written, but self-serving and anti-military

    An indifferent high school student with no higher
    aspirations, who enlisted in the Army only to avoid being drafted.
    No wonder he hated it!
    And, no wonder this book is a "staple" in campus Vietnam courses; it's
    anti-military theme is evident from the first page to the last. "I'll
    never wear a uniform again..."; indeed.I recommend "A Rumor of War" by
    Philip Caputo, a college literature major, for a less prejudical look
    at the Vietnam war from the eyes of a "grunt".

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 17, 2014

    From start to finish, all throughout his book this guy rant and

    From start to finish, all throughout his book this guy rant and raved about our American leaders at how we screwed everyone militarily. I struggled to complete the book because I purchased it thinking it was a great deal. His book would have been enjoyable if it wasn't for all his complaining about our government. He praised Jane Fonda and the was protestors. This guy should have never returned to America, he should have stayed at one of these third world countries. I'm really disappointed in John Ketwig's "documentary." I will NEVER purchase another one of his books nor will I recommend it to anyone. Very disappointing.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 19, 2008

    A Self-Purging Catharsis of Vietnam

    I recently read this book alittle afraid that this author's recanting of his Vietnam experience would be dimmed in light of the fact that he wrote this book 14 years after he last set foot in Vietnam. However this was not the case. There are other reviews in this space that review the whole history of this book, from an innocent boy in upstate New York to his odessey in Vietnam and later, Thailand. However, what struck me 'as I had a similar experience in life' was how he fell so deeply in love with a prostitute that Kegwig must have known in the deep recesses of his mind would never work, and of course didn't, which crushed him. It's the 'takeaway''you can't buy the product-someone left a small deposit on it-or we all want something we know we can't get'. Back to Ketwig's book, the author gives strong reasons the U.S. could not win in S.E. Asia. After the January, 1968 Tet Offensive, President Johnson fired Robert McNamara, his secretary of defense, and replaced him with Clark Clifford, who promptly advised L.B.J. to get out of Vietnam A.S.A.P. I will use a direct quote of Ketwig:'Our military training had urged us to have undying faith in America's ultramodern war-fighting technologies. From the enormous computer rooms at long Binh to the reconnaissance satellites in space, microchips had made every day's actions known and predictable. We had firepower, from the awesome minigun, able to fire 1500 rounds per minute, to the M-16 rifle. There were 42 different missle systems in use, and a rainbow of chemical defoliants to strip away Charley's cover. We could rely upon tens of thousands of electronic sensors dropped upon the Ho Chi Minh Trail. These sensors detected movement, noise, even the ammonia in urine, supposedly allowing bombers to thwart North Vietnamese troop or equipment movements. We had waves of air power, helicopters, fighters, bombers. We has napalm and white phosperous bombs. We had giant bulldozers to destroy forest or farmland. And we has nuclear weapons. Technology had become America's God, and Vietnam attracted the worshipers like a Deep South revival'. Here is Ketwig's conclusion and the crux of this book:'The technology worked in movies like 'Dr. No' and 'Goldfinger', but in the jungles of Vietnam, it failed miserably. In 1965, 177 helicopters were lost, at a cost of $250,000 each. Only 76 fell to hostile action. And all the electronic surveillance did little to warn us of the Tet bloodbath. The Pentagon buying sprees had equipped us, but America's effort was hampered by unreliable equipment, lack of a coherent overall strategy for using the technology and communicating with other branches of the military and the failure to successfully convince the average soldier for the need for war. All the king's dollars and all the king's men, and all the dollars the Pentagon fantasy mongers threw at the situation could not overcome Vietnam's determination. We saw that clearly, seven long years before the war would end'. That extract states everything about the defeat of this country in Indochina. There is another passage in the book that aside from the sordid details of the prostitution industry in S. Vietnam and Thialand, which Ketwig handsomely samples and writes about, is the overconsumption of marijuana, which is rife everywhere. In fact, Kegwig expresses remorse about going back to 'The World' because he will not be able to legally continue his addiction to cannibus, nor will he find the same high potency statewide. another interesting anecdote was when Ketwig was walking around Saigon and black marketeers were selling everything from hair spray, Beatles albums and Kodac cameras. Ketwig relays:'Laundry detergent and Salem cigarettes were most popular. I couldn't believe my eyes,there was an M-16 rifle! I had carried an obsolete M-14 for months, which was a blessing because it resisted jamming from sand better than an M-16, but this was supposed to be the latest, greatest weapon in the world, and this wrinkled up

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 20, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 7, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)