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And One for All
     

And One for All

4.0 3
by Theresa Nelson
 

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Years ago Geraldine, her older brother, Wing, and his best friend, Sam, swore eternal friendship and everlasting loyalty to each other.

Now it's 1967 and Wing, a senior, thinks the Marines and Vietnam have more to offer than school. But Sam would rather march for peace. Can Geraldine help them keep their pledge alive?

Overview

Years ago Geraldine, her older brother, Wing, and his best friend, Sam, swore eternal friendship and everlasting loyalty to each other.

Now it's 1967 and Wing, a senior, thinks the Marines and Vietnam have more to offer than school. But Sam would rather march for peace. Can Geraldine help them keep their pledge alive?

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Set in three turbulent years of an extraordinary decade, the '60s, Nelson's new novel achieves its grace by portraying an impersonal, often abstract war in Vietnam as it affected American families in the most personal of ways. Geraldine, more than a little in love with her cousin Sam, and half-irritated, half-charmed by her older brother Wing, quietly observes the changes in her family, the shifts in viewpoints that send one boy off to war and the other off to peace marches in Washington. Larger issues are encompassed in telling details: Wing, the poor student, enlists in the Marines after miserably failing (so he thinks) a test he has worked hard to pass; Sam, Wing's tutor, whose own father died in a previous war, is headed for college and is therefore exempt from the draft. When Wing dies, it is Geraldine's own pilgrimage to Washington that heals the wounds that have begun to divide her family. Broader in scope than the author's Devil Storm or The 25? Miracle (but delivering little that is new to the rhetoric of war and peace), this novel saliently sets the habits and legends of a family against the crisis in a nation's conscience. A Richard Jackson Book. Ages 11-13. (Apr.)
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 6-10In a tense story set during the Vietnam War, stalwart Geraldine takes her first unpopular stand to convince her family that love and friendship are more important than politics. With distilled emotional power, Nelson solidly evokes echoing themes of unmet expectations, family disappointments, tragedy, and healing acceptance. (Feb. 1989)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780531058046
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
04/01/1989
Pages:
192
Product dimensions:
5.70(w) x 8.43(h) x 0.84(d)
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

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And One for All 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
'And One For All' is a great book....but i had to read it for a book report. The only reason i didn't give it 5 stars was because if i didnt have to read it for a book report, i probably wouldn'y have read it. It is very well written and the ending is sad because of Wing. I would recommend this book to anyone who wants read about the vietnam war and how 3 teenagers deal with it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I really enojoyed the novel And One For All. It was very touching and it shows the true meaning of friendship. It also shows that you should never give up and fill your mind with dreams and try your best to fulfill them troughout your life.
Guest More than 1 year ago
And One for All is a wonderfully written book, that is a perfect read when learning about the Vietnam War because it is historically accurate. The author does not try to confuse the reader with an impressive vocabulary yet, still tells the story in an interesting way. This novel of excellent lenghth has happy, sad, shocking and touching emotions hidden within the words. And One for All is told through the eyes of the main character Geraldine (who loves to read). It has characters that everyone can relate to. Sam Daily who lives with his mother and is on his high school basketball team. Wing who does badly in school joins the marines. Dub, the little brother, Mom, the worrywart and Dad, the war veteran, wrap up this family. Overall, this book was one I would recommend to my friends. It ends in a delightful way that makes the whole book come together.