And the Cars Go...

Overview

Hop in for a droll read-aloud vrooming with sound words and intricate illustrations of all things that go.

What’s this? A huge traffic jam? But everyone’s in a hurry! There’s the family in the paneled station wagon (brrrm, brrrmm), packed to the roof rack with gear for the beach. There’s the be-hatted Duke and Duchess, out for a drive in their ornate Rolls Royce (whisper, whisper). Not to mention a yellow school bus bursting with kids in beanies (chug, chug), an overheating race...

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Overview

Hop in for a droll read-aloud vrooming with sound words and intricate illustrations of all things that go.

What’s this? A huge traffic jam? But everyone’s in a hurry! There’s the family in the paneled station wagon (brrrm, brrrmm), packed to the roof rack with gear for the beach. There’s the be-hatted Duke and Duchess, out for a drive in their ornate Rolls Royce (whisper, whisper). Not to mention a yellow school bus bursting with kids in beanies (chug, chug), an overheating race car (bang, hissssss . . .), an ice-cream truck ("Mamma mia! My ice cream is melting!"), and other vehicles revving to go. Who — or what — could be holding them all up?

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Editorial Reviews

The New York Times - Sarah Harrison Smith
Adults reading this book aloud can unleash their goofiest accents—and not just British or Italian ones…And the Cars Go… has great visual flair: It could have been unearthed from a 1970s time capsule. Bee draws his vehicles in profile with a fine black line and wonderfully precise detail…Abundant use of fabulous fuchsia, racing-car green and electric Kool-Aid orange may give parents flashbacks to their own childhoods. Today's children, oblivious to such cultural references, are nonetheless likely to find it all a lot of fun.
Children's Literature - Barbara L. Talcroft
English artist William Bee (not to be confused with English artist John William Bee of the early twentieth century) brings his own imperturbable style to this tale of fantastic vehicles caught in a traffic jam. (That must be Bee himself in a vintage sports car, coming and going on the front and back covers.) The story begins with a toy-like motorcycle policeman in a nifty steampunk uniform vrooming off on patrol. He soon discovers a formidable holdup clogging a road full of automotive constructions covered with ingenious hoses, gears, wheels, and gadgets. This wondrous parade begins with a wood-paneled station wagon from the seventies, followed by such vehicles as a Duke and Duchess’s chauffeured Rolls-Royce, Mr. Luigi’s luscious ice-cream truck, and a magenta beach buggy full of bearded hippies, guitars, and surfboards. The road rolls on beneath them, punctuated by Lego-like signposts (“To the Beach,” “No Parking,” “Tea”). Kids who love to build can revel in the multitude of details to examine, while everyone else can enjoy the story, saturated colors, the “retro-futurist” design, and the extraordinary cause of the jam—three beautiful prize sheep replete with ribbons. Each vehicle has its own sound, from the Rolls’s whisper whisper through the school bus’s chuggety chug to the street sweeper’s whoosh whoosh. Of course, the sheep go Baaa! Baaa! Baaa! What fun! Through it all, the little policeman remains unflappable, except when he steps into the sweeper’s foam, which makes his final expression (a smile as he feeds the curly ram an ice cream cone) all the more satisfying; readers are challenged to hunt for fifteen snails hidden in the digital illustrations. Those who want more will love Bee’s And the Train Goes… (Candlewick, 2007) and Beware of the Frog (Candlewick, 2008). Reviewer: Barbara L. Talcroft; Ages 3 to 7.
School Library Journal
12/01/2013
PreS-Gr 1—When a policeman on a motorcycle comes across a line of stopped traffic, he walks to the front of the jam to see what's causing the standstill. Along the way, he passes a station wagon, the Duke and Duchess in a Rolls-Royce, a school bus, a race car, an ice-cream truck, a beach buggy, and a street sweeper. Each vehicle has its own sound, and the occupants each have a comment about the traffic holdup. The cause is Farmer Jake's prize sheep. All of the people get out of their vehicles and help herd the animals back into their field. "And, at last, all the cars go…." The text is clever and amusing, but it's the wonderfully detailed digital illustrations that will keep kids coming back again and again. As in and the Train Goes… (Candlewick, 2007), Bee's collagelike illustrations have a 1960s sensibility. The cars are chock-full of details, from the complicated workings of the street sweeper to the crank on the front of the Rolls. There are plenty of amusing details too, including two very mischievous seagulls. As a bonus, children are encouraged to find 15 hidden snails; it's not easy. A fun read-aloud and a great book to pore over again and again.—Catherine Callegari, Gay-Kimball Library, Troy, NH
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780763665807
  • Publisher: Candlewick Press
  • Publication date: 12/10/2013
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 329,013
  • Age range: 2 - 5 Years
  • Product dimensions: 11.00 (w) x 9.62 (h) x 0.37 (d)

Meet the Author

william bee, the author-illustrator of And the Train Goes... and other picture books, is an artist and commercial designer who has worked for renowned fashion houses, including Issay Miyake and Paul Smith. He lives in England.

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