...And the Tin Pan Bended and the Story Ended...

...And the Tin Pan Bended and the Story Ended...

5.0 1
by Dave Van Ronk
     
 
Dave Van Ronk did as much as anyone to midwife and instill quality control in the urban folk boom of the early '60s, and his death in 2002 signaled for many the passing of an era. Now Smithsonian Folkways has issued his last concert, held in October 2001 in Takoma Park, and from the opening song, a delicately sung version of Scrapper

Overview

Dave Van Ronk did as much as anyone to midwife and instill quality control in the urban folk boom of the early '60s, and his death in 2002 signaled for many the passing of an era. Now Smithsonian Folkways has issued his last concert, held in October 2001 in Takoma Park, and from the opening song, a delicately sung version of Scrapper Blackwell's "Down South Blues," it is obvious that listeners are in the midst of an autumnal performance. Van Ronk's deliberate jazz phrasing is still there, as are the signature guitar skills, but the gruff power in his voice is all but gone, replaced by a soft, hoarse whisper, and there are many times when you can hear his difficulty drawing breath in the spaces between singing. All of this brings a tremendous intimacy and poignancy to several of the songs here, and the hushed delivery gives songs like Len Chandler and Bob Kaufman's "Green, Green Rocky Road" an uncommon power to connect. The between-song comments by Van Ronk (who had just learned of his cancer diagnosis prior to the show) reveal an intelligent, humorous man with a tremendous passion for music, particularly jazz, and a hornman's sense of timing. Every song here carries a graceful sense of urgency, but Van Ronk's versions of Jimmie Cox's "Nobody Knows You (When You're Down and Out)" and Tom Paxton's "Did You Hear John Hurt?" are particularly powerful, and on the former song, Van Ronk sounds remarkably like Louis Armstrong or a casually relaxed and resigned Tom Waits. Newcomers to Van Ronk's music should probably sample his earlier albums first, since they give a clearer version of this performer in his prime, but longtime friends and fans will find the dignity, grace, and intimacy of this last show to be a very special farewell.

Product Details

Release Date:
06/29/2004
Label:
Smithsonian Folkways
UPC:
0093074015629
catalogNumber:
40156
Rank:
150659

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Dave Van Ronk   Primary Artist,Guitar,Vocals

Technical Credits

Christine Lavin   Producer
Tom Paxton   Composer,Liner Notes,Annotation
Bob Dylan   Composer
Joni Mitchell   Composer
Billy Eckstine   Composer
Earl Hines   Composer
Len Chandler   Composer
Dave Van Ronk   Arranger,Composer,Adaptation
Richard Burgess   Marketing
James Cox   Composer
Mitch Greenhill   Executive Producer
George Mitchell   Composer
Lou Singer   Composer
Elijah Wald   Annotation,Track Notes
Hy Zaret   Composer
Walter Brown McGhee   Composer
Ryan Hill   Marketing
Andrea Vuocolo   Producer,Introduction,Annotation
James Dempsey   Composer
Lee Michael Demsey   Marketing
John "BJ John" Smith   Marketing,Promotions Director
Bob Kaufman   Composer
Traditional   Composer
Joe Primrose   Composer
Mark Gustafson   Marketing
David Eisner   Engineer,Liner Notes,Annotation
Helen Lindsay   Public Relations
John Henry   Composer
Toby Dodds   Management

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...And the Tin Pan Bended and the Story Ended... 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I've been to more than a few Dave Van Ronk concerts and I was amazed and blown away by the brilliance of his last performance as documented on this CD. Although he was seriously ill, the guitar playing, the singing and the storytelling are absolutely wonderful.