And then it Rained / And than the Sun Came Out

And then it Rained / And than the Sun Came Out

5.0 1
by Crescent Dragonwagon, Diane Greenseid
     
 

And then it rained...

And what a long time since it has rained! A whole apartment building full of overjoyed neighbors revel in the raininess. It's the perfect day to read a book on dinosaurs, to stay home and bake bread, or even to go out for a splishy-splashy adventure to a café with your father for a bowl of hot soup.

But when it

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Overview

And then it rained...

And what a long time since it has rained! A whole apartment building full of overjoyed neighbors revel in the raininess. It's the perfect day to read a book on dinosaurs, to stay home and bake bread, or even to go out for a splishy-splashy adventure to a café with your father for a bowl of hot soup.

But when it keeps raining day after day after day, baking bread becomes dull, and splishy-splashy walks become plain old wet ones and not at all adventuresome. You begin to long for the kind of weather where you'd want to eat ice cream, not soup. Naturally everyone starts grumbling....Everyone, that is, except for the wise father of one grouchy little boy because...

The sun comes out! And what a long time since it has come! A whole apartment building full of overjoyed neighbors celebrate the sunniness. For it's the perfect day to go roller skating, visit the bakery, or put on your shiny cool sunglasses and stroll out for a sunny day adventure, including a ringside seat at an outdoor café with your father for a dish of ice cream.

But when the sun gets hotter and hotter, day after day after day, roller skating gets exhausting, and a walk becomes less and less of an adventure and more and more uncomfortable. You begin to long for the kind of weather where you'd want to eat soup, not ice cream. Naturally everyone starts grumbling....Everyone, that is, except for the wise father of one grouchy little boy because...

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publishers Weekly
This two-in-one book features the highs and lows of a pair of meteorological opposites. A boy, his father and five diverse apartment residents experience a heat wave in one half of the story and, with a flip of the book, seemingly endless rainy days in the other. Comparisons between the two weather extremes play out in Greenseid's (When Aunt Lena Did the Rhumba) full-spread acrylics and lively spot illustrations, which depict the city-dwellers going about their daily routines. Initially, all are content with a climate change, as when it finally rains after a bout of scorching summer heat. "Jerome Katz read a book about dinosaurs.... Jon Griswold danced as he cleaned his apartment." But when the downpour persists, "People began to get grouchy. Jerome Katz got soaking wet when he left 3-G to return the book about dinosaurs to the library.... Jon Griswold sneezed and coughed." Descriptive to a fault, Dragonwagon's (Bat in the Dining Room) narrative may not offer enough of a story for young readers, even with the flip-over format (perhaps of greater interest to adults, one character reminisces about a trip to Turkey, another quotes Bible verses). But Greenseid's illustrations buffer the more drawn-out passages, entertaining readers with her diverse perspectives, cheery hues and comfy, rounded edges. Ages 4-8. (May) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
This is a weather book and a city book and an intriguing reversible picture book. Grey rain clouds hover over the city, the drops pour down to everyone's delight, especially that of a raincoated little boy and his father, who splash along to a caf� for hot soup. We meet a number of apartment dwellers, each enjoying the rain in a different way, till it lasts just too long for everyone's comfort. The father, however, likes a rhyme and makes a promise: "Rain brings sun and sun brings rain./Then it turns around again." Kids will have fun flipping the book over and finding another story, And Then the Sun Came Out. A huge orange sun spreads its rays and everyone basks in the warmth and light, till finally the heat becomes exhausting. Father makes his rhyming promise once again and, yes, you can flip the book over and bring back the rain. The prose is rollicking, full of details of city life, echoed in the bold, cheerful illustrations. The acrylic colors glow brightly, especially in the sunny section; the buildings curve as though seen through a lens; the city is full of action, rain or shine. Young readers could try writing and publishing a story of their own in a flippable format (do not forget to look at the endpapers) or this would make a lively read-aloud on a rainy (or a sunny) day. 2002, Atheneum, Talcroft
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
A divided book that readers flip over and continue, this title alternates between rain and sunshine, with a look at activities for each kind of weather. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
A rainstorm chases most people indoors, where they happily do things they'd almost forgotten about during the hot weather. But it lasts too long, and the same people who were happy become grumpy. When a boy wishes for an end to it, his dad says, "Rain brings sun and sun brings rain. Then it turns around again." The boy doesn't like the poem, but his father assures him that he will get his weather wish. "What happened next? To find out, close the book, flip it over, and see!" The story starts anew with the sun coming out. First everyone loves the sun, and then it gets too hot. That same boy wishes for some relief, and it's time to flip to the other side. The sun and rain activities of the supporting cast of city dwellers are at once personal and universal and mesh nicely. Greenseid's bright, acrylic illustrations have a curvy, skewed perspective that fits perfectly. This is good wet (or dry) fun for storytime. (Picture book. 4-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780689818844
Publisher:
Atheneum Books for Young Readers
Publication date:
04/02/2003
Pages:
40
Product dimensions:
9.83(w) x 11.30(h) x 0.42(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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And then it Rained / And than the Sun Came Out 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A kind of flip-over mobius strip of a book, the cycles of rain and sun, and the activities each kind of weather fosters through multiple linked characters in a big bustling multi-ethnic city, this is charming, funny, and exuberantly told (with bright pictures which match the text perfectly). Our kids relate to how good a weather change feels at first, and then start giggling every time in delighted recognition as the same characters who were overjoyed grow cranky and grouchy as it keeps on being rainy, or hot and sunny, day after day after day. Subtly, this book is not just about weather and a community within a city apartment building, but about human nature, and change, itself. Wise; fun. Our 4 and 6 year-olds just love to shut and turn the book over, as directed in the text (it is really two books, which end in the center) and start over again. The only drawback is because it never really ends, bedtime can be put off indefinitely because 'we haven't finished the book yet!' Love as well as her PASSIONATE VEGETARIAN (adult cookbook, very well written and comprehensive) which we have been cooking out of with delight since last fall. No matter what subject Dragonwagon writes on, or for what age, she seems to write so well, and wisely, with depth, humor and an oddly perfect ear for both daily joy and poignancy. Her books, all that we have read (and cooked from), anyway, are irresistible. Can you tell we are Dragonwagon fans?