And to Think That We Thought That We'd Never Be Friends
  • And to Think That We Thought That We'd Never Be Friends
  • And to Think That We Thought That We'd Never Be Friends

And to Think That We Thought That We'd Never Be Friends

4.5 2
by Mary Ann Hoberman, Kevin Hawkes
     
 

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In rhyming verse that’s a deliberate homage to Dr. Seuss, poet and picture book author Mary Ann Hoberman takes on quarreling and its consequences, and shows how turning fighters into friends leads to greater peace. It all starts with a fighting brother and sister, who make up with the help of another sibling. When the family begins fighting with their noisy

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Overview

In rhyming verse that’s a deliberate homage to Dr. Seuss, poet and picture book author Mary Ann Hoberman takes on quarreling and its consequences, and shows how turning fighters into friends leads to greater peace. It all starts with a fighting brother and sister, who make up with the help of another sibling. When the family begins fighting with their noisy neighbors, it’s music that brings them together. Soon the whole town is marching in a parade, and eventually the parade swells to include the whole country, and even the animals. By the end of this optimistic picture book, the whole world is united in friendship.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Inspired by Dr. Seuss's And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street, "This utopian tale begins with passing discord between siblings and progresses to a vision of world peace through an enormous parade," said PW. Ages 4-8. (Feb.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
This utopian tale begins with passing discord between siblings and progresses to a vision of world peace through an enormous parade. Inspired by Dr. Seuss's And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street, the light-footed rhythms of Hoberman's (One of Each) text skip blithely from easily resolved family squabbles to a quarrel with a neighbor that begins the burgeoning parade joined by townsfolk, police officers and zoo animals. The lion may not lie down with the lamb, but according to Hawkes's (Weslandia) pulsing and swaying spreads, they will cavort together to band music. Although everyone here unites in song, in the book's first examples, music has no role; those incidents merely point to the transience of anger and seem slightly out of step with the rest of the text. But even those aberrations reflect the infusion of Seuss's spirit in Hoberman's fluid rhythms and rhymes. Hawkes's exaggerated perspectives, bustling crowd scenes and loud colors contribute to the carnivalesque gaiety--especially when the revelers cross the ocean on the backs of sharks and birds. Youngsters will want to jump in before this parade can pass them by. Ages 5-8. (Oct.) Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Library Journal
K-Gr 5-According to Hoberman, Dr. Seuss's And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street "provided both [the] cadence and inspiration" for this book. Based on the premise that kindness and inclusiveness can produce worldwide harmony, this story poem dances first through the resolution of small sibling skirmishes, then progresses to a major international parade that heals all differences. Each verse's lilting, singsong rhyming pattern ends with the refrain: "And to think that we thought that we'd never be friends!" Hawkes's playful and colorful acrylic artwork sparkles with energy. The number of characters grows from a squabbling brother and sister to "hundreds and thousands and millions of friends!" The magical transformation from anger and criticism to enthusiasm and love, by humans and beasts alike, is accomplished by invitations to all to join the musical parade. Even an ocean doesn't stop the marching because all of the sea creatures join in. This bouncy title will make a wonderful read-aloud, especially as a responsive poem with children echoing the chorus. It would also be great for creative dramatics, with youngsters joining a parade, complete with whistles, spoons, and drums.-Betty Teague, Blythe Academy of Languages, Greenville, SC Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780440417767
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
02/25/2003
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
927,527
Product dimensions:
11.06(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.13(d)
Age Range:
3 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

Mary Ann Hoberman is the author of a number of acclaimed books for children, including One of Each, The Seven Silly Eaters, and the classic A House Is a House for Me.
Kevin Hawkes has illustrated many books for children, including My Little Sister Ate One Hare by Bill Grossman, a School Library Journal Best Book of the Year.

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And to Think That We Thought That We'd Never Be Friends 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I bought this at the school book fair because of the great pix and the rhyming scheme. It's fun to read and it's about peace, without being preachy.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I glanced at this book in my college bookstore... I had to read the entire book before I left for class!!! Every page showed exactly how my niece and nephew act daily with each other from fighting over the Tv to fighting over the computer... The pictures are really cute and funny!! I recommend this book for everyone that has siblings in the family.... :_)