And Two Boys Booed

Overview

On the day of the talent show, a boy is ready to sing his song, and he isn't one bit scared because he has practiced a billion times, plus he's wearing his lucky blue boots and his pants with all ten pockets. But as all of the other kids perform before him, he gets more and more nervous. How the boy overcomes his fear of performing in front of the class makes a charming and funny read-aloud, complete with ten novelty flaps to lift.

A Margaret ...

See more details below
Hardcover (First Edition)
$14.03
BN.com price
(Save 17%)$16.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (20) from $3.52   
  • New (17) from $8.99   
  • Used (3) from $3.52   

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (NOOK Kids)
$9.99
BN.com price
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.

Overview

On the day of the talent show, a boy is ready to sing his song, and he isn't one bit scared because he has practiced a billion times, plus he's wearing his lucky blue boots and his pants with all ten pockets. But as all of the other kids perform before him, he gets more and more nervous. How the boy overcomes his fear of performing in front of the class makes a charming and funny read-aloud, complete with ten novelty flaps to lift.

A Margaret Ferguson Book

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

The New York Times Book Review - Sarah Harrison Smith
…[a] witty story about perseverance…Blackall…brings quirky expression to every illustration…
Publishers Weekly
★ 06/23/2014
It was an inspiration to pair Viorst and Blackall in this funny, ingenious, and true-to-life story about stage fright. It’s the morning of the class talent show, and the narrator couldn’t be more ready; lifting the first of several small flaps, readers can see the boy beaming under his bedcovers. But with five kids ahead of him in the talent lineup, there’s a lot of time for nerves to build, and by the time the boy stands to sing, performance anxiety and some mild heckling turns to his brain to soup: What exactly was his talent, again? On five consecutive flaps, a series of improbable talent mashups swirl around the boy’s head (“I started walking my poem. I mean, I started dancing my hands”), making palpable both the boy’s discombobulation and the sense of eternity that’s a signature feature of embarrassing moments. Finally, he just opens his mouth and... sings. Cue the applause. Because as Viorst knows better than anyone, sometimes what seems awful or terrible really isn’t the end of the world. Ages 4–8. Illustrator’s agent: Nancy Gallt, Nancy Gallt Literary Agency. (Sept.)
From the Publisher
 

 

"A little boy tries to convince himself that he is ready to sing his song in the class talent show . . . Viorst communicates the turmoil and the resolution in innovative ways . . . The result is an abstracted, expressive exploration of apprehension, made accessible with careful language and thoughtful imagery." - Booklist

 

"There's so much going on in this kid-friendly book - and all of it great." - The Horn Book

 

"A boy waits with increasing trepidation for his turn in the class talent show in this cumulative story . . . Viorst ably returns to the familiar trope of vanquishing childhood fears, nicely abetted by the talented Blackall." - Kirkus Reviews

 

 "It was an inspiration to pair Viorst and Blackall in this funny, ingenious, and true-to-life story about stage fright." -Publisher's Weekly STARRED REVIEW

 

"This is a good school story with clever art. Clearly both author and illustrator had fun creating it, and students will have no trouble enjoying it." - School Library Journal

 

Children's Literature - Vicki Foote
A boy awaits his chance to sing at the school talent show, saying he is not a bit scared because he has practiced a billion times. In first person narrative, he explains that he is also wearing his lucky blue boots and his pants with cool pockets. At school, he waits for five other students to perform, and each page repeats the first four lines about the fact that he is not scared. But when his turn comes, he stands up and sits down and two boys boo. He keeps changing his mind about singing his song and instead decides to do some funny things like reading his toes. When he eventually sings his song, two boys boo again, but the other kids clap as he bows. There are flaps throughout the book that lift up to reveal things, like the items in the boy’s pockets. With its repetitive lines, this humorous book would be fun to read aloud to young children, and the flaps provide some hands?on interaction. The illustrations are interesting and cute. This pleasant story would be a good addition for home and school libraries. Reviewer: Vicki Foote; Ages 4 to 7.
School Library Journal
08/01/2014
Gr 1–3—"On the morning of the talent show, I was ready to sing my song." Lift the flap and see the charming narrator toss back the bedcovers with a smile. Using a cumulative story structure, he recounts the events of the big day, until something bad happened—when he sang his song, two boys booed. Telling this part of the story, he mixes up the words of the cumulative tale, and each spread shows a lift-the-flap version of the silly word combination: "I kept changing my mind about songing my sing. I started walking my poem." Although the boos momentarily throw the narrator off his stride, the rest of the class cheers enthusiastically. There is no resolution or consequence to the booing, but in life it's impossible to please everyone, and the real lesson is in finding satisfaction with doing your best. A final flap causes the boy to bow, and on the endpages he is happily singing his song. Characters emotions are clearly portrayed through body language and facial expression. As he gradually succumbs to stage fright, the narrator tries to make himself disappear by shrinking inside his clothing. From page to page, kids in the audience fidget, play with each other's hair, distract others, and whisper—giving real authenticity to the tale. This is a good school story with clever art. Clearly both author and illustrator had fun creating it, and students will have no trouble enjoying it.—Anna Haase Krueger, Ramsey County Library, MN
Kirkus Reviews
2014-06-30
A boy waits with increasing trepidation for his turn in the class talent show in this cumulative story.He's diligently practiced his song "a billion times" and wears his "lucky blue boots" and pants "with cool pockets." (Blackall's appealing illustrations cleverly incorporate flaps: Kids can check out the teeming contents of one of those pockets.) As, in succession, Chloe reads her poem, Henry walks on his hands, Georgia dances on her toes, Leo juggles, and Madeleine shows off her paintings, the young narrator grows ever more discombobulated, seeming to disappear into his yellow-striped sweater. He begins mixing up words: "On the talent of the morning show, I was ready to song my sing." Uncertain as his turn arrives, he gets up and sits down repeatedly. Five double-page spreads depict his imagination's chaotic fantasy, as he mentally mixes up talent-show props and activities and begins "walking my poem" and "dancing my hands." Blackall clearly separates the realistic and fantasy elements—for the latter, she gives the boy blue pants and khaki-colored boots with pockets. When he finally manages to sing his song, "[t]wo boys booed. / But all the other kids were clapping!" The multiethnic classroom is adeptly managed by a sanguine teacher who keeps those two impish boys close by.Viorst ably returns to the familiar trope of vanquishing childhood fears, nicely abetted by the talented Blackall. (Picture book. 4-7)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780374303020
  • Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
  • Publication date: 9/2/2014
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 570,010
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 8.10 (w) x 10.30 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Judith Viorst is the author of Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day, among other books for children and adults. She is also a newspaper columnist who frequently writes for The New York Times and the Washington Post. She lives in Washington, D.C.

Sophie Blackall has illustrated many books for young readers, including Meet Wild Boars and The Big Red Lollipop. She is also the illustrator of the popular series Ivy and Bean. She lives in Brooklyn, New York, with her two children.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)