And Two Boys Booed

Overview

On the day of the talent show, a boy is ready to sing his song, and he isn't one bit scared because he has practiced a billion times, plus he's wearing his lucky blue boots and his pants with all ten pockets. But as all of the other kids perform before him, he gets more and more nervous. How the boy overcomes his fear of performing in front of the class makes a charming and funny read-aloud, complete with ten novelty flaps to ...

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Overview

On the day of the talent show, a boy is ready to sing his song, and he isn't one bit scared because he has practiced a billion times, plus he's wearing his lucky blue boots and his pants with all ten pockets. But as all of the other kids perform before him, he gets more and more nervous. How the boy overcomes his fear of performing in front of the class makes a charming and funny read-aloud, complete with ten novelty flaps to lift. 

 

A Margaret Ferguson Book

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
★ 06/23/2014
It was an inspiration to pair Viorst and Blackall in this funny, ingenious, and true-to-life story about stage fright. It’s the morning of the class talent show, and the narrator couldn’t be more ready; lifting the first of several small flaps, readers can see the boy beaming under his bedcovers. But with five kids ahead of him in the talent lineup, there’s a lot of time for nerves to build, and by the time the boy stands to sing, performance anxiety and some mild heckling turns to his brain to soup: What exactly was his talent, again? On five consecutive flaps, a series of improbable talent mashups swirl around the boy’s head (“I started walking my poem. I mean, I started dancing my hands”), making palpable both the boy’s discombobulation and the sense of eternity that’s a signature feature of embarrassing moments. Finally, he just opens his mouth and... sings. Cue the applause. Because as Viorst knows better than anyone, sometimes what seems awful or terrible really isn’t the end of the world. Ages 4–8. Illustrator’s agent: Nancy Gallt, Nancy Gallt Literary Agency. (Sept.)
From the Publisher
"A boy waits with increasing trepidation for his turn in the class talent show in this cumulative story . . . Viorst ably returns to the familiar trope of vanquishing childhood fears, nicely abetted by the talented Blackall." - Kirkus Reviews

 

STARRED REVIEW "Cohn’s minimal text is simultaneously funny and foreboding; it’s balanced by Steinke’s doll-like figures, whose pin-dot eyes and stiff movements ease the tension." -Publisher's Weekly

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780374303020
  • Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
  • Publication date: 9/2/2014
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Pages: 32
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 10.00 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.31 (d)

Meet the Author

Judith Viorst is the author of Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day, among other books for children and adults. She is also a newspaper columnist who frequently writes for The New York Times and the Washington Post. She lives in Washington, D.C.

 Sophie Blackall has illustrated many books for young readers, including Meet Wild Boars and The Big Red Lollipop. She is also the illustrator of the popular series Ivy and Bean. She lives in Brooklyn, New York, with her two children.

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