Andrew Jackson Brown, Confederate Soldier

Andrew Jackson Brown, Confederate Soldier

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by Patricia Pickle Wolf
     
 

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Andrew Jackson Brown was a 17-year-old young man when he enlisted in Pontotoc, Mississippi, to fight in the War Between the States. He determined to keep a record of the battles as he experienced them It is mostly a very matter-of-fact presentation of where he was, who the commanders were, and what happened as they fought. He often served as the chaplain in his unit

Overview

Andrew Jackson Brown was a 17-year-old young man when he enlisted in Pontotoc, Mississippi, to fight in the War Between the States. He determined to keep a record of the battles as he experienced them It is mostly a very matter-of-fact presentation of where he was, who the commanders were, and what happened as they fought. He often served as the chaplain in his unit and he seemed to handle himself well in the out of doors, camping on the ground with very primitive eating arrangements. Two times he was imprisoned by the Union (or as he called them "Yankey") soldiers.

The diary he kept is now in the archives of the Evans Memorial Library of Aberdeen, MS. Each of his grandchildren have a typewritten copy of the diary; but there were many more who wished for a copy of their own. That is the impetus for the publication of Andrew Jackson Brown — Confederate Soldier.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940012320087
Publisher:
Publish America
Publication date:
12/02/2010
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
620 KB

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Andrew Jackson Brown, Confederate Soldier 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
U-R-There More than 1 year ago
Andrew Jackson Brown, Confederate Soldier is a diary kept by the 17 year old young man from the time he enlisted in the Mississippi infantry regiment until the War Between the States is over. In telling the war as it happened to him personally, he writes matter-of-fact information, tries not to complain, and attempts to present happenings in his regiment very factually. So, when he tells of someone who is executed for desertion (Stand or sit on his casket, and then shot), it leaves a very stark reaction; the amount of time they spent marching from one place to another; when the general kept them in reserve until it was too late to help affect the outcome of the battle of Vicksburg; When his commanding officer, helping to load a cannon, is shot through the chest with a cannon ball (Gen Tlighman). These were things he experienced when a very young man. He does not write often about feelings, but one cannot help but sense some of the horror of those battles. You will not be able to put it down until you have read it all. It is a new approach to a very old subject.