×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Andromache
     

Andromache

1.0 1
by Euripides
 

See All Formats & Editions

Euripides (480 BC-406 BC) is revered as one of the three great tragedians of classical Athens, along with Aeschylus and Sophocles, and produced the largest body of extant work by any ancient playwright. He is considered to be the most modern of the three, and his works laid the foundation for Western theatre. Euripides turned to playwriting at a young age, achieving

Overview

Euripides (480 BC-406 BC) is revered as one of the three great tragedians of classical Athens, along with Aeschylus and Sophocles, and produced the largest body of extant work by any ancient playwright. He is considered to be the most modern of the three, and his works laid the foundation for Western theatre. Euripides turned to playwriting at a young age, achieving his first victory in the dramatic competitions of the Athenian City Dionysia in 441 b.c.e. He would be awarded this honor three more times in his life, and once more posthumously. Written about ten years after the Trojan War, "Andromache" may be a bitter attack on the Trojan national character. Andromache has been given as a slave and concubine to Neoptolemus, son of Achilles, and incurs the wrath of his barren wife, Hermoine, when she becomes pregnant. The plot illustrates a sophistry, cowardice and violence in the Spartans.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781420904017
Publisher:
Digireads.com Publishing
Publication date:
01/01/2014
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
895 KB

Meet the Author

Susan Stewart is Regan Professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania. Wesley D. Smith is Professor Emeritus of Classical Studies at the University of Pennsylvania.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Andromache 1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
"Read Instantly" shows this to be the Gilbert Murray play, not the classic Greek play by Euripides. They are completely different plays but have the same name and some of the same characters.