Andy Shane and the Queen of Egypt

Overview

"Andy and Dolores tangle as they try to negotiate their bumpy friendship. . . .An upbeat volume for confident beginning readers." — THE HORN BOOK

The school Culture Fair is coming up, and Andy Shane has to pick an African country to learn about. Deciding isn’t easy for Andy, so he’s glad when Granny Webb gives him a scarab beetle, which he knows is a symbol of Egypt. But when Andy tries to tell Ms. Janice, Dolores Starbuckle springs up with her gold jewelry and glitter sandals ...

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Overview

"Andy and Dolores tangle as they try to negotiate their bumpy friendship. . . .An upbeat volume for confident beginning readers." — THE HORN BOOK

The school Culture Fair is coming up, and Andy Shane has to pick an African country to learn about. Deciding isn’t easy for Andy, so he’s glad when Granny Webb gives him a scarab beetle, which he knows is a symbol of Egypt. But when Andy tries to tell Ms. Janice, Dolores Starbuckle springs up with her gold jewelry and glitter sandals and claims that she is the queen of Egypt. Dolores always gets her way — but this time Andy doesn’t feel like caving in. What will it take for him to share his project with the bossy queen? Fans of the endearing Andy Shane will be happy to see him holding his own in his new early-chapter-book adventure.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
I Am the Queen

Andy Shane parked his bike and shifted the weight in his backpack. "Let's meet by the tree when the clock says three," he said.

"I will ride my bike, or we will have to hike," said Granny Webb.

Granny and Andy had been talking in rhymes all morning. It was hard to stop once you got started.

"Oh, wait!" said Granny.

"Don't be late," said Andy, waving good-bye.

"No, really," called Granny Webb. "I have something for you."

Andy turned back to see what Granny was pulling from her pocket. Whatever it was appeared to be on the end of a long gold chain.

"Oooh," said Andy, moving closer. It was a dark green bug frozen in clear plastic. "A beetle!"

"A scarab beetle!" said Granny.

"Is this Egyptian?" asked Andy.

Andy knew that the scarab beetle was important to the people of ancient Egypt.

"I think so," said Granny Webb, handing it to Andy. "I knew you were thinking about African countries last night, and a memory of it popped into my head while I
was heading off to bed!"

Andy laughed at Granny's rhyme.

"Thanks," he said, and he headed into school.

"What do you think of my new sandals, Andy Shane?" asked Dolores Starbuckle as they sat down at their desks.

"Cool," said Andy.

"I made them myself with milk cartons and glitter," said Dolores. Andy noticed that Dolores Starbuckle was particularly fancy this morning.

"I hope each of you has chosen an African country," said Ms. Janice. "We need to get ready for the school Culture Fair."

Dolores Starbuckle sat up as tall as she could.

"Polly," said Ms. Janice with her pen in the air, ready to write, "what country would you like to learn about?"

"Kenya," said Polly. "My uncle went to Kenya."

Kenya was a large country with deserts and rain forests. Andy had almost chosen Kenya.

"Ahmed?" asked Ms. Janice.

"The Gambia."

Ms. Janice told the class that The Gambia was a small farming country. Andy thought he might like to be a farmer one day.

"Andy Shane?"

Andy touched his pocket. "Egypt," he said softly.

"I'm sorry, Andy," said Ms. Janice. "I didn't hear you."

"I think he said Ethiopia," said Dolores. She was always trying to be helpful.

"Is that right, Andy?" asked Ms. Janice.

Andy shook his head.

"Do you mean Nigeria, Andy Shane?" said Dolores. "I think you mean Ni-geeeeee-ria."

"Egypt," Andy said more loudly.

"But you can't choose Egypt," said Dolores, springing out of her seat. "I'm wearing my white Egyptian clothes and my gold jewelry. I even made sandals. I am the QUEEN
of Egypt."

The class laughed.

Andy slumped down on his desk. Why did Dolores Starbuckle always insist on getting what she wanted?
But he couldn't argue with her- not in front of the whole class!

Andy knew everyone was waiting for his answer. He wished he could disappear altogether.

"We'll work this out later," said Ms. Janice. She finished calling on the children. Then she told the class to line up for a visit to the library, where they could begin their research.

"Andy Shane," she said, "you're line leader."

Dolores stood in front of Andy.

"Andy Shane, you know I loooove Egypt!" she said. "I even have a model of a sphinx!"

"What's a sphinx?" asked Polly.

"A statue. Mine has a lion's body with a bird's head," said Dolores.

"Weird," said Polly.
"But I have this," said Andy. He pulled out the beetle.

"Oooh," said Dolores, admiring the necklace. She sighed a long, deep sigh. Then her face brightened. "Can we work together, Andy Shane?"

Andy didn't know what to say. He liked to take his time with ideas, see how they felt. And right now, he did not feel like giving Dolores her way.

"I'll think about it," he said.

Children's Literature - Amy Orr
Jennifer Richard Jacobson has written several books about Andy Shane and his bossy friend, Dolores Starbuckle. The Andy Shane series is about contrasting personalities and friendship. In Andy Shane and the Queen of Egypt, Andy and the bossy Dolores have been assigned their first-ever culture fair project. Both Andy and Dolores want to do their culture fair about Egypt. Dolores tries to convince Andy to work on their projects together, but the differences in personality make it difficult for Andy. Andy would rather work by himself. Dolores doesn't give up. One afternoon, Andy and Dolores are hanging out at Andy's house with his granny. They are making pineapple pizza for dinner. Dolores makes a pyramid out of pineapples and tells Andy that their culture fair project would be a hit if they worked together and made pineapple pyramids. Andy isn't interested. He doesn't want to work as a team. At school, the students have to present their culture fair plans. Andy is unprepared. If he isn't going to present Egypt by himself, he isn't going to present anything at all. Dolores reminds him of the superhero dressed up like a mummy that he has in his desk. Andy presents the mummy and chooses Egypt. When Dolores decides to present Togo instead of Egypt at the culture fair, Andy jumps up and tells his teacher that they are going to present Egypt together. They end up having the best culture fair project in the class. This book is excellent for parents to use with their children to help encourage appropriate social skills at school. This book is also a great way for early childhood elementary teachers to introduce the concept of science fairs and collaborative work. Reviewer: Amy Orr
School Library Journal

K-Gr 2- Quiet, reflective Andy Shane continues his determination to stand up to his boisterous, exuberant friend Dolores. As he heads to school, Granny Webb gives him a scarab necklace for his African-country assignment. When he announces that he has chosen Egypt, Dolores, wearing elaborate, self-made Egyptian accessories, proclaims herself "Queen of Egypt" and tells Andy that he can't have it. She builds a pyramid out of pineapple chunks despite his preference for pineapple on his pizza, and, at T-ball, she distracts him and the entire outfield with an Egyptian dance in the stands, causing him to miss a catch and lose the game. The next day, Dolores shows her support during class presentations and they agree to be partners on their assignment. Andy's sensitivity and personal growth are deftly and humorously conveyed in Jacobson's text. Readers new to the series may wonder about Andy's relationship to Granny Webb, but that does not diminish this engaging and satisfying entry that can stand alone. Carter's pencil and black watercolor wash illustrations depict a cast of expressive Caucasian characters, and while the gray tones are somber, they perfectly reflect Andy's contemplative nature.-Laura Scott, Farmington Community Library, MI

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780763644048
  • Publisher: Candlewick Press
  • Publication date: 9/8/2009
  • Series: Andy Shane Series
  • Pages: 64
  • Sales rank: 297,756
  • Age range: 5 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 4.90 (w) x 7.40 (h) x 0.30 (d)

Meet the Author

Jennifer Richard Jacobson has written numerous books for younger readers, including two other critically acclaimed stories about Andy Shane. She lives in Yarmouth, Maine.

Abby Carter is the illustrator of all the books in the Andy Shane series as well as MY HIPPIE GRANDMOTHER by Reeve Lindbergh. She lives in Hadlyme, Connecticut.

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Read an Excerpt

I Am the Queen

Andy Shane parked his bike and shifted the weight in his backpack. "Let's meet by the tree when the clock says three," he said.

"I will ride my bike, or we will have to hike," said Granny Webb.

Granny and Andy had been talking in rhymes all morning. It was hard to stop once you got started.

"Oh, wait!" said Granny.

"Don't be late," said Andy, waving good-bye.

"No, really," called Granny Webb. "I have something for you."

Andy turned back to see what Granny was pulling from her pocket. Whatever it was appeared to be on the end of a long gold chain.

"Oooh," said Andy, moving closer. It was a dark green bug frozen in clear plastic. "A beetle!"

"A scarab beetle!" said Granny.

"Is this Egyptian?" asked Andy.

Andy knew that the scarab beetle was important to the people of ancient Egypt.

"I think so," said Granny Webb, handing it to Andy. "I knew you were thinking about African countries last night, and a memory of it popped into my head while I
was heading off to bed!"

Andy laughed at Granny's rhyme.

"Thanks," he said, and he headed into school.

"What do you think of my new sandals, Andy Shane?" asked Dolores Starbuckle as they sat down at their desks.

"Cool," said Andy.

"I made them myself with milk cartons and glitter," said Dolores. Andy noticed that Dolores Starbuckle was particularly fancy this morning.

"I hope each of you has chosen an African country," said Ms. Janice. "We need to get ready for the school Culture Fair."

Dolores Starbuckle sat up as tall as she could.

"Polly," said Ms. Janice with her pen in the air, ready to write, "what country would you like to learn about?"

"Kenya," said Polly. "My uncle went to Kenya."

Kenya was a large country with deserts and rain forests. Andy had almost chosen Kenya.

"Ahmed?" asked Ms. Janice.

"The Gambia."

Ms. Janice told the class that The Gambia was a small farming country. Andy thought he might like to be a farmer one day.

"Andy Shane?"

Andy touched his pocket. "Egypt," he said softly.

"I'm sorry, Andy," said Ms. Janice. "I didn't hear you."

"I think he said Ethiopia," said Dolores. She was always trying to be helpful.

"Is that right, Andy?" asked Ms. Janice.

Andy shook his head.

"Do you mean Nigeria, Andy Shane?" said Dolores. "I think you mean Ni-geeeeee-ria."

"Egypt," Andy said more loudly.

"But you can't choose Egypt," said Dolores, springing out of her seat. "I'm wearing my white Egyptian clothes and my gold jewelry. I even made sandals. I am the QUEEN
of Egypt."

The class laughed.

Andy slumped down on his desk. Why did Dolores Starbuckle always insist on getting what she wanted?
But he couldn't argue with her- not in front of the whole class!

Andy knew everyone was waiting for his answer. He wished he could disappear altogether.

"We'll work this out later," said Ms. Janice. She finished calling on the children. Then she told the class to line up for a visit to the library, where they could begin their research.

"Andy Shane," she said, "you're line leader."

Dolores stood in front of Andy.

"Andy Shane, you know I loooove Egypt!" she said. "I even have a model of a sphinx!"

"What's a sphinx?" asked Polly.

"A statue. Mine has a lion's body with a bird's head," said Dolores.

"Weird," said Polly.
"But I have this," said Andy. He pulled out the beetle.

"Oooh," said Dolores, admiring the necklace. She sighed a long, deep sigh. Then her face brightened. "Can we work together, Andy Shane?"

Andy didn't know what to say. He liked to take his time with ideas, see how they felt. And right now, he did not feel like giving Dolores her way.

"I'll think about it," he said.

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