Andy & Sofia

Andy & Sofia

5.0 2
by Andres Trevino
     
 
In an incubated petri dish in a Boston laboratory, a cluster of eight living cells holds the key to a daring new era of medical science. These cells come from a human embryo, containing genetic material from my wife, Paulina, and me, obtained through in vitro fertilization (IVF). Research using these cells holds enormous potential to cure a fatal disease, saving the

Overview

In an incubated petri dish in a Boston laboratory, a cluster of eight living cells holds the key to a daring new era of medical science. These cells come from a human embryo, containing genetic material from my wife, Paulina, and me, obtained through in vitro fertilization (IVF). Research using these cells holds enormous potential to cure a fatal disease, saving the lives of countless children and relieving their families of unspeakable pain. We lived that pain ourselves.

When our son was born we didn’t know what a tortuous road stretched ahead of us– how our baby would suffer, and how we’d suffer with him. We didn’t know he’d spend nearly 1,000 days in seven different hospitals, see more than 300 doctors and swerve close do death many times. We didn’t know we’d have to take matters into our own hands to find the medical miracle that would save him.

Nine years ago, Paulina and I embarked on a desperate quest. We needed to create a baby with the right genetic profile, whose umbilical cord blood could save our 2-year-old son, Andy, dying from a rare genetic disease. The baby would also have to be free of the inherited disease killing our son. After three years and five IVF cycles, and with the critical intervention of a novel medical technology called pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), our daughter, Sofia, was born. Her cord blood stem cells, transplanted into her brother via blood transfusion, replaced his faulty immune system and saved his life. Today we are blessed that Andy, 11, and Sofia, 6, are both healthy, beautiful children.

In gratitude, Paulina and I donated the remaining frozen IVF embryos—the ones that could never be used because they carried the flawed gene causing the disease—to the Stem Cell Research Program at Children’s Hospital Boston, where Andy’s disease was diagnosed and cured. Scientists there were able to develop two new stem cell lines whose unique genetic properties will help researchers learn how Andy’s disease, and many others, develop. From that knowledge will come treatments and cures.

My wife and I know our story and its difficult moral choices is highly controversial. We’ve chosen to share it to give the issue a human face and voice—and to give hope to other families facing similar dilemmas.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940012673503
Publisher:
Andres Trevino
Publication date:
03/14/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
8 MB

Meet the Author

Andrés L. Treviño is a fundraiser at Children’s Hospital Boston, and is a frequent spokesman for stem cell research. He’s been invited to present his story by a number of businesses and institutions, including classes at Harvard Medical School and MIT. He has a business and sales background as well as web publishing and marketing experience. He kept a blog during his son Andy’s six-year journey from terminal illness to cure, and Andy & Sofia is a memoir of that journey.

Kate Kruschwitz is a writer and public relations consultant with 30 years’ experience in business, academic and medical fields. She has published many articles in trade and consumer magazines, and had her own PR and marketing company, for nine years. Previously she edited Am I Thin Enough Yet? and The Cult of Thinness for Sharlene Hesse-Biber, PhD (Oxford University Press). She is currently senior communications officer at the Children’s Hospital Trust.

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Andy & Sofia 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
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