Angel de la Luna and the 5th Glorious Mystery

( 1 )

Overview

"Angel de la Luna is a beautifully told, and at times, heartbreaking coming of age and coming to America story. Evelina Galang is a masterful storyteller and through her brilliant voice and craft, Angel and her family become ours too."—Edwidge Danticat

Angel has just lost her father, and her mother's grief means she might as well be gone too. She's got a sister and a grandmother to look out for, and a burgeoning consciousness of the unfairness ...

See more details below
Paperback
$10.60
BN.com price
(Save 11%)$12.00 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (11) from $5.27   
  • New (8) from $6.60   
  • Used (3) from $5.27   
Note: Visit our Teens Store.
Sending request ...

Overview

"Angel de la Luna is a beautifully told, and at times, heartbreaking coming of age and coming to America story. Evelina Galang is a masterful storyteller and through her brilliant voice and craft, Angel and her family become ours too."—Edwidge Danticat

Angel has just lost her father, and her mother's grief means she might as well be gone too. She's got a sister and a grandmother to look out for, and a burgeoning consciousness of the unfairness in the world—in her family, her community, and her country.

Set against the backdrop of the second Philippine People Power Revolution in 2001, the contemporary struggles of surviving Filipina “Comfort Women” of WWII, and a cold winter’s season in the city of Chicago is the story of a daughter coming of age, coming to forgiveness, and learning to move past the chaos of grief to survive.

M. Evelina Galang is the author of Her Wild American Self and the novel One Tribe. She has edited the anthology Screaming Monkeys: Critiques of Asian American Images. She is currently writing Lolas' House: Women Living with War, stories of surviving Filipina WWII "Comfort Women," and is at work on a new novel. Galang teaches in and directs the creative writing program at the University of Miami, is core faculty for VONA/Voices: Voices of Our Nation Arts Foundation, and has been named one of the one hundred most influential Filipinas in the United States by Filipina Women's Network.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
10/14/2013
It’s the year 2000 in Manila, and 14-year-old Angel is grieving the sudden death of her papang (father). When Angel’s ináy (mother) becomes a certified nurse and moves to Chicago, Angel grasps for new footing and rejects everything from god to her supposed gift of healing hands. Through her studies, Angel becomes an activist, protesting corruption in a country where the Filipino “Comfort Women” of WWII and the 1986 Philippine People Power Revolution haunt many minds. Angel is eventually summoned to Chicago, bringing a fresh set of challenges including attending an American high school. Galang’s (One Tribe) writing is ethereal and immersive; she blends English, Tagalog, and slang in her sentences (“Pintig, I hear my papang calling, pintig”), forcing readers to tease out the meanings of unfamiliar words and phrases (or fire up Google Translate). Readers may find it a challenge, but it’s entirely doable—Galang gracefully laces her narrative with contextual clues. Angel is hyperaware of her world and steeped in social consciousness; following her as she seeks her “true nature” is a pleasure and an education. Ages 12–up. (Nov.)
From the Publisher

"Angel finds purpose, strength, and peace in feminist activism." —2014 Amelia Bloomer Project List in the "Young Adult" category

"[Angel's] intimate storytelling style will appeal to teenage readers and adults. Galang draws us into a foreign world with beautifully rendered sketches . . . But despite such poetic descriptions, Angel is an authentic teen, who texts her friends and likes to bang on drums, just like her musician father." —Miami Herald

"In an interview, she has stated that she wrote this story when hurricanes disrupted the writing of a nonfiction account of the lives of wartime “comfort women” survivors. That legacy — of creation and life in the heart of destruction — survives in this fine novel, Coffee House Press’ first in the YA genre." Star Tribune

"Galang’s (One Tribe) writing is ethereal and immersive . . . Angel is hyperaware of her world and steeped in social consciousness; following her as she seeks her 'true nature' is a pleasure and an education." —Publishers Weekly

"[A] raw and scathing exploration of the challenges faced by immigrant adolescents." World Literature Today

"Adolescence, family issues, music and revolutionary politics all sink sharp hooks into a Filipino teenager at the beginning of the 21st century. Related with a rich mixture of English, “Taglish” and Tagalog dialogue, Angel’s tale . . . [is] a vivid portrait of a culture, with particular focus on its women."—Kirkus Reviews

"[Galang's] novel is deeply grounded in Angel's Filipina experience, with Tagalog words and 'Taglish' hybrids dropped in the text in the natural places bilingual speakers might use them. Yet it's a story built on a universal template: a mother and teen daughter who don't understand each other in the moment." —Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

"Angel’s story shows the struggles of a young woman who tries to keep it together as everything she has known and loved slowly slips away from her grasp. . . . [She] is never afraid to take a stand — something individuals of all ages can aspire to do." Northwest Asian Weekly

"Galang’s writing is lyrical and rich – something to savor. . . This is a book not to be missed." Rich in Color

"With YA fiction titles being so strongly tilted toward the paranormal and the speculative, M. Evelina Galang’s Angel de La Luna and the Fifth Glorious Mystery provides a refreshing change of pace in the field with its focus on its young, rebellious, and spirited titular protagonist. . . . Galang’s novel complicates the ethnoracial bildungsroman, revealing the tortuous trajectory of young and older migrants and the hauntings that come with transnational movements." Asian American Lit Fans

"Angel de la Luna is a poetic coming-of-age story about personal loss and the transformative power of political activism. . . . [T]he tender generational bonds between Angel and Lola Ani, as well as the teen’s staunch feminist awareness, pack an emotional punch and ring true." School Library Journal

"[Angel] explores the American Dream and how everybody wants the dream, but nobody realizes how difficult it is to maintain. . . . It’s about strong women making their way through adversity as well as a mother-daughter story for a universal audience." Inquirer.net

"Galang masterfully weaves Filipino history --- from World War II to the People Power Revolutions --- with the rising tension between Angel and Inay. . . . Engaging, visceral, compassionate and heartwarming are but a few choice words to describe Galang's third in a collection of fabulous books focused on Filipina American issues." Teen Reads

"You know just about everything you need to know in those first lines [of Angel de la Luna and the 5th Glorious Mystery]. Character. Dialogue. Conflict. Rhythm. It's all there."The Writer

"A story of teenage rebellion, Angel de la Luna and the 5th Glorious Mystery is also a novel of adult grace. Its particular triumph is to give an intimate voice to radical themes: a young woman sees the immigrant’s American dream through the lens of Third World activism and gives us startling ways of looking and words for seeing the world." —Gina Apostol

"Angel de la Luna is pure poetry, a heart-rending story told by a young girl whom I would follow anywhere. The voice is pitch-perfect; the music a constant. In this collision of cultures and languages, of the deepest sorrows, M. Evelina Galang has found resounding beauty. I want to shower her and her book with rose petals!" —Cristina Garcia

"A poignant and well-crafted coming-of-age novel set in Manila and Chicago, Angel de la Luna and the 5th Glorious Mystery is about a Filipino family’s and, in a larger picture, their native country’s, fractured past and present. Above all, it is about the indomitable spirit of a young woman that guides her out of grief and longing, and fuels her with renewed strength to continue her struggle against injustices." —R. Zamora Linmark

"A richly detailed novel full of music and color, Angel de la Luna and the 5th Glorious Mystery tells a story of difficult journeys: from innocence to experience, from life in the Philippines to life in the United States, and from longing through anger and back to love again. Just as Angel finds strength in the stories of other women who have endured the hardest of circumstances, readers will find strength in the unforgettable Angel as she discovers her own life’s rhythm." —Sheri Reynolds

“Remarkably complex and eminently readable, M. Evelina Galang’s Angel de la Luna speaks of people separated by time and distance; it speaks of the tension created by Filipino and American cultures; it speaks of comfort women and the horrors they faced at the hands of Japanese soldiers during World War II. Only a writer of Galang’s talents and accomplishments could tackle such important subjects with grace and dignity. Angel de la Luna is a novel of great beauty and strength.” —Pablo Medina

"Galang is a strong storyteller . . . and she has written a contemporary young adult classic. [T]he sort of story that makes you think and that sticks with you even after you’ve turned the last page!" —Em's Bookshelves

"A touching coming-of-age story, Angel de La Luna and the 5th Glorious Mystery highlights the struggles faced by immigrant children as well as adolescents learning to express themselves within their families and societies. . . . I strongly recommend the book for those wanting to learn about a different culture, and especially for young teens going through changes in their own lives." Creative Kids, Cindy Liu, age 16

"The setting and the history woven into Angel’s story is what will set this novel apart. . . . [Galang's] writing is gorgeous and I found myself highlighting many lines and marveling often at her word choice. [T]his is an important story and one that should be told." —Allodoxophobia: The Fear of Opinions

VOYA - Stacey Hayman
Living in Manila, fourteen-year-old Angel de la Luna, her younger sister Lila, her grandmother, and her parents might not be rich in material goods, but they are rich in the love they have for each other. After her father's unexpected death and her mother's subsequent emotional collapse, the family bonds become more important than ever, but growing financial concerns are about to force critical changes on them all. At the end of the book, readers will discover that the author chose not to include definitions of unfamiliar, foreign words as this is how she learned new languages as a child and that subtle nuances in word usage can change the meaning. This information is helpful in reaching a greater understanding of the book and it is regrettable that readers are not made aware of this before beginning the story, but the real challenge is sorting through the author's abundance of competing storylines. Watching Angel morph into a student revolutionary, learn to use her inherited gift of spiritual healing, connect to her father through playing the drums, and absorb the culture shock after moving to America— these are all individually interesting but will leave readers with a disjointed or incomplete feeling as they finish the book. Teens who are curious about other cultures and history, or those who enjoy lyrical writing, should give this one a chance. Reviewer: Stacey Hayman
School Library Journal
01/01/2014
Gr 9 Up—Recalling the turbulent era of the second Philippine People Power Revolution in 2001, Angel de la Luna is a poetic coming-of-age story about personal loss and the transformative power of political activism. Fifteen-year-old Angel's father was killed in a horrific accident, and with her mother consumed by grief, the teen copes by getting involved in community organizing efforts to depose President Joseph Estrada. Through her grandmother, Lola Ani, Angel also learns about the surviving Filipina "Comfort Women" who suffered atrocities during World War II. Meanwhile, Angel's mother decides to move to America for a better life, promising to send for her daughters. Unable to forgive what she perceives as maternal abandonment, Angel further immerses herself in consciousness-raising and activist work. When her mother eventually sends for her, the teen arrives in Chicago sullen and homesick; she struggles to reconnect with her mother and to bridge cultural differences. While compelling, the novel has some slight shortcomings-large chunks of Tagalog dialogue are interspersed throughout with limited context and no glossary to assist with interpretation. At times, the story feels bogged down by complex themes that potentially overwhelm when combined into one narrative. Yet, the tender generational bonds between Angel and Lola Ani, as well as the teen's staunch feminist awareness, pack an emotional punch and ring true. Galang artfully contrasts political instability in the Philippines with the personal upheaval in a teen's life in a way that will resonate with patient readers.—Lalitha Nataraj, Escondido Public Library, CA
Kirkus Reviews
2013-10-30
Adolescence, family issues, music and revolutionary politics all sink sharp hooks into a Filipino teenager at the beginning of the 21st century. Related with a rich mixture of English, "Taglish" and Tagalog dialogue, Angel's tale begins with the sudden loss of her Papang (father) and the ensuing departure of her Ináy (mother) for America. Switching time and locale halfway through, Angel flies from Manila to Chicago two years later, just before her 16th birthday, only to discover that she has a new stepfather and baby brother. In a narrative rush propelled by grief and anger, Angel chronicles hard times struggling to support herself, her little sister, Lila, and her grandmother Lola Ani while attending a convent school run by activist nuns who lead politicized students out in demonstrations against the Estrada regime. In Chicago, she conducts a cold war at home while facing culture shock and sparking a student walkout at her new school. In both countries, Angel is deeply embedded in webs of close-knit community and extended family. References to then-current politics mix with explicit, shocking testimonials from elders who were brutally used as "Comfort Women" by Japanese soldiers in World War II. Along with these, Galang folds Filipino food, dress, sights and customs into her narrative. As a result, and particularly because the meanings of the non-English lines and expressions are not always clear in context, events and characters are often outshone by their milieu. The multilingual text will be a stumbling block for many readers, but it's a vivid portrait of a culture, with particular focus on its women. (afterword, study questions) (Historical fiction. 14-18)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781566893336
  • Publisher: Coffee House Press
  • Publication date: 11/5/2013
  • Pages: 304
  • Sales rank: 682,905
  • Age range: 12 years
  • Product dimensions: 5.40 (w) x 7.40 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author


M. Evelina Galang is the author of Her Wild American Self (Coffee House Press, ’96); the novel One Tribe (New Issues Press, ’06). She has edited the anthology, Screaming Monkeys: Critiques of Asian American Images (Coffee House Press, ‘03). She is currently writing Lolas’ House: Women Living with War, stories of surviving Filipina WWII “Comfort Women” and is at work on a new novel, Beautiful Sorrow, Beautiful Sky. Galang teaches in and directs the Creative Writing Program at the University of Miami, is core faculty for VONA/Voices: Voices of Our Nation Arts Foundation and has been named one of the 100 most influential Filipinas in the United States by Filipina Women’s Network.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 19, 2015

    Angel is an engaging story of a young Filipina immigrating in th

    Angel is an engaging story of a young Filipina immigrating in the wake of her father's death. The dialect lacks any key or glossary which some readers are likely to find frustrating. But the tale nonetheless sweeps up the reader. There are several scenes that especially draw strong emotional responses from the reader and flaunt Galang's ability to compose. The tale reads swiftly and ends with little resolution of the plot. Overall, Angel is a masterful tale of a girl becoming a young woman in a world she doesn't understand and well-deserving of a read. Or two.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)