Angels Flight (Harry Bosch Series #6)

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Overview

At the foot of Angels Flight, an inclined railway in the heart of downtown Los Angeles, a lawyer is found murdered on the eve of a landmark trial. Howard Elias's lawsuits charging the LAPD with racism and brutality made him a celebrity - even as his success earned him the hatred of nearly every police officer in the city. When Harry Bosch is put in charge of the team investigating Elias's murder he knows that his colleagues are likely to be his chief suspects. He also knows that the city's smoldering racial ...
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Angels Flight (Harry Bosch Series #6)

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Overview

At the foot of Angels Flight, an inclined railway in the heart of downtown Los Angeles, a lawyer is found murdered on the eve of a landmark trial. Howard Elias's lawsuits charging the LAPD with racism and brutality made him a celebrity - even as his success earned him the hatred of nearly every police officer in the city. When Harry Bosch is put in charge of the team investigating Elias's murder he knows that his colleagues are likely to be his chief suspects. He also knows that the city's smoldering racial tensions could ignite if he missteps. As he works night and day in the glare of a major media event, Bosch struggles with a more personally urgent mystery: trying to find out whether his wife's disappearance means she has left him for good or fallen deeper into a dangerous addiction. On streets filled with angry mobs, amid burning buildings and under fire from rooftop snipers, Bosch must find the one answer that will make sense of the case's strangely unconnected pieces - exposing himself to grave danger in the hope of saving his job, his marriage, and his city.
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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review

Fallen Angels

With Angels Flight, Michael Connelly, the New York Times bestselling author of Blood Work and The Poet, returns to the bread-and-butter character -- the tough, no-holds-barred LAPD detective Harry Bosch -- who has virtually catapulted Connelly to the top of the gritty, police-procedural-thriller heap. Loaded with electrifying sequences, intriguing "NYPD Blue"-like big-city politics and procedures, and a killer plot stacked with high-speed twists and turns that'll keep you guessing until its very end, Angels Flight is an intense and terrific read.

Although Angels Flight was my first Connelly experience, I guarantee that it will not be my last. This novel really impressed me. Set in Los Angeles, the town where high-profile trials such as the O. J. Simpson and Rodney King affairs have captivated and scarred the nation in the '90s, Angels Flight serves up a compelling and highly sensitive double-murder investigation that has L.A.'s disgruntled black community setting its sights on the LAPD. When a controversial black lawyer (à la Johnny Cochran), who has made an extremely lucrative career defending the rights of the city's slugs while prosecuting the beleaguered police force, is found murdered, the media immediately point their fingers at the LAPD, and rioting is once again in the air. Was it actually a cop with a killer vendetta? It's up to Harry Bosch to uncover the sick and shocking truth.

Howard Elias, a savior in the eyes of Los Angeles's black community, is a devil to the city's law-enforcement agencies. Notorious for fanning the fires of high-profile civil-rights cases in which cops are depicted as evil incarnate, out to keep the poor black man down, Elias sets fear and anger coursing through any cop's veins. Now, on the eve of an extremely volatile trial that has the police once again jammed between a rock and a hard place, Elias is dead, brutally shot on the deserted late-night Angels Flight train.

Nothing sits right for Harry Bosch and his team. First they're selected out of rotation to head up the Elias murder. Then they're forced to work with an internal affairs group that's headed by a "prick" named Chastain; on more than one occasion, Chastain has investigated Bosch for procedural wrongdoing. Then there's Deputy Chief Irving, who appears to be more interested in damage control than he is in uncovering the truth. Although the acrimony among the investigators is an inch thick at the start, they agree on one issue: A suspect -- or a patsy -- had better be named soon, or there's going to be some serious hell to pay.

Thus begins the whirlwind of action, intrigue, and blistering suspense that is forged so masterfully by the talented Connelly. The plot may sound straightforward, even clichéd, but the reader is in for a chilling surprise. Each page reveals another potential suspect, startling discovery, death, or seemingly unmovable obstacle or distraction. During one 30- or 40-page sequence, the reader is bounced around so much that the publisher should include a warning label alerting those prone to motion sickness to keep their Dramamine nearby. Take nothing at face value: Friends may be enemies; enemies may be friends. The plot really keeps you guessing. If you enjoy hard-boiled police procedurals or just expertly written roller-coaster rides of suspense, give Angels Flight a read. You won't be disappointed.

--Andrew LeCount

Philip Oakes
Exciting, authentic, grimly satisfying. -- Literary Review
Christoph Klock
You will turn pages as fast as you can. Thenwhen you finishyou will be a bit wiser about the human condition. If you have read earlier Harry Bosch novelsAngels Flight is a must-read now. If you have missed the earlier booksyou might want to start with The Black Echo and The Black Ice"keepers" available in paperback. —The Mystery Reader.com
Marilyn Stasio
Bosch is a wonderful old-fashioned hero who isn't afraid to walk through the flames — and suffer the pain for the rest of us.
New York Times Book Review
USA Today
Michael Connelly is one of those masters...who can keep driving the story forward in runaway locomotive style.
Pam Lambert
Although Angels rarely takes wing, it's still a flight well worth taking.
People Magazine
Rick McMahan
...Harry’s life is in upheaval. For those of us who thought Harry’s marriage to Eleanor Wish would end his personal unhappiness, we were wrong. From the outset of Angels Flight, Eleanor is gone and Harry, as well as the reader, struggle with why she’s left. In the end, we are left, like Harry, wondering where Eleanor is and what will happen to Harry Bosch. Once again Michael Connelly has written an excellent tale.
Over My Dead Body.com
From The Critics
Connelly is often called the heir-apparent to Raymond Chandler....[He] brings a newsman's ear to the language of the streets...
Library Journal
A black lawyer famed for his antidiscrimination suits against the LAPD is murdered before a big trial, and guess who gets to investigate? Connelly's hotshot Harry Bosch, of course.
Christoph Klock
You will turn pages as fast as you can. Then, when you finish, you will be a bit wiser about the human condition. If you have read earlier Harry Bosch novels, Angels Flight is a must-read now. If you have missed the earlier books, you might want to start with The Black Echo and The Black Ice, "keepers" available in paperback.
The Mystery Reader.com
USA Today
Michael Connelly is one of those masters...who can keep driving the story forward in runaway locomotive style.
Rick McMahan
...Harry’s life is in upheaval. For those of us who thought Harry’s marriage to Eleanor Wish would end his personal unhappiness, we were wrong. From the outset of Angels Flight, Eleanor is gone and Harry, as well as the reader, struggle with why she’s left. In the end, we are left, like Harry, wondering where Eleanor is and what will happen to Harry Bosch. Once again Michael Connelly has written an excellent tale.
Over My Dead Body.com
Talk Magazine
Conelly's latest thriller about Harry Bosch, the irascible and erusite homicide detedtive, was the most compelling crime book of the year.

Talk Magazine's 10 Best Books of 1999

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780786218646
  • Publisher: Gale Group
  • Publication date: 5/28/1999
  • Series: Harry Bosch Series , #6
  • Edition description: Large Print
  • Pages: 595
  • Product dimensions: 5.70 (w) x 8.79 (h) x 1.21 (d)

Meet the Author

Michael  Connelly

Michael Connelly is the #1 bestselling author of the Harry Bosch series of novels and the Mickey Haller series and legal thrillers, as well as The Poet, Blood Work, Void Moon, Chasing the Dime, and The Scarecrow. He is a former newspaper reporter who has won numerous awards for his journalism and his novels. He spends his time in California and Florida

Biography

Best known for his dark police procedurals featuring the tough, complex and emotionally scarred LAPD detective, Hieronymous "Harry" Bosch, Michael Connelly has been called "infernally ingenious" (The New York Times), "one of those masters...who can keep driving the story forward in runaway locomotive style" (USA Today) and "the top rank of a new generation of crime writers" (The Los Angeles Times).

Consistently exquisite prose and engrossing storylines play an integral role in his swelling success. However, Connelly believes that solid character development is the most important key. As he explained to MagnaCumMurder.com, "I think books with weak or translucent plots can survive if the character being drawn along the path is rich, interesting and multi-faceted. The opposite is not true."

A native of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Connelly attended the University of Florida; there he discovered the works of Raymond Chandler -- author of many classic Los Angeles-based noir dramas such as The Big Sleep, The Long Goodbye, and Farewell, My Lovely. The cases of Philip Marlowe inspired Connelly to be a crime novelist -- and by studying journalism, he put himself in the perfect position. "I went into journalism to learn the craft of writing and to get close to the world I wanted to write about -- police and criminals, the criminal justice system," he told MagnaCumMurder.com.

After graduation, Connelly worked the crime beat for two Florida newspapers. When a story he and a colleague wrote about the disastrous 1985 crash of Delta Flight 191 was short-listed for the Pulitzer, Connelly landed a gig in Marlowe's backyard, covering crime for one of the nation's largest newspapers -- The Los Angeles Times. Three years later, Harry Bosch was introduced in The Black Echo, which earned Connelly the Edgar Award for Best First Novel. Connelly has since won every major mystery honor, including the Anthony (The Poet, Blood Work) and the Macavity Award (Blood Work).

While Connelly has written stand-alone novels that don't feature his tragic protagonist Harry Bosch, he is best identified by his rigid, contentious and fiery -- but also immensely skilled and compassionate -- detective. According to The Boston Globe, the Bosch series "raises the hard-boiled detective novel to a new level...adding substance and depth to modern crime fiction."

Called "one of the most compelling, complex protagonists in recent crime fiction" (Newsweek) and "a terrific...wonderful, old-fashioned hero who isn't afraid to walk through the flames -- and suffer the pain for the rest of us" (The New York Times Book Review), Bosch faces unforgettable horrors every day -- either on the street or in his own mind. "Bosch is making up for wrongs done to him when he rights wrongs as a homicide detective," Connelly explained in an interview with his publisher. "In a way, he is an avenging angel."

Bosch is clearly a product of his deadly, unforgiving environment. "The philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche once wrote that when you look into the darkness of the abyss the abyss looks into you. Probably no other line or thought more inspires or informs my work," said Connelly in the same interview. With each passing novel, Bosch looks deeper and deeper into the abyss; and readers continue to return to see just how far he will gaze.

Good To Know

  • Michael Connelly received a huge career boost in 1994 when then President Bill Clinton was photographed walking out of a Washington bookstore with a copy of The Concrete Blonde under his arm. Connelly remarked to USA Today, "In the six years I've been writing books, that is the biggest thrill I've had."

  • Real events have always inspired Connelly's plots. His novel Blood Work was inspired by a friend who underwent transplant surgery and was coping with survivor's guilt, knowing someone had died in order for him to live. The book was later developed into a feature film starring Clint Eastwood, Angelica Huston, and Jeff Daniels.

  • One of Connelly's writing professors at the University of Florida was cult novelist Harry Crews.

  • Connelly named his most famous character after the 15th Century Dutch painter, Hieronymous Bosch. As he told Bookends UK in an interview, Bosch "created richly detailed landscapes of debauchery and violence and human defilement. There is a ‘world gone mad' feel to many of his works, including one called ‘Hell' -- of which a print hangs on the wall over the computer where I write." Some interesting outtakes from our interview with Connelly:

    "I wrote a mystery story as a class paper in high school. It was called The Perfect Murder. The protagonist's named was McEvoy, a name I later used for the protagonist in The Poet. Being a witness to a crime when I was 16 was what made me interested in crime novels and mystery stories."

    "I wrote my first real murder story as a journalist for the Daytona Beach News Journal in 1980. It was about a body found in the woods. Later, the murder was linked to a serial killer who was later caught and executed for his crimes."

    "Everything I want people to know about me is in my books."

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      1. Hometown:
        Sarasota, Florida
      1. Date of Birth:
        July 21, 1956
      2. Place of Birth:
        Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
      1. Education:
        B.A. in Journalism, University of Florida, 1980
      2. Website:

    Table of Contents

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    First Chapter

    Chapter One

    The word sounded alien in his mouth, as if spoken by someone else. There was an urgency in his own voice that Bosch didn't recognize. The simple hello he had whispered into the telephone was full of hope, almost desperation. But the voice that came back to him was not the one he needed to hear.

    "Detective Bosch?"

    For a moment Bosch felt foolish. He wondered if the caller had recognized the faltering of his voice.

    "This is Lieutenant Michael Tulin. Is this Bosch?"

    The name meant nothing to Bosch and his momentary concern about how he sounded was ripped away as an awful dread stole quickly into his mind.

    "This is Bosch. What is it? What's wrong?"

    "Hold please for Deputy Chief Irving."

    "What is--"

    The caller clicked off and there was only silence. Bosch remembered who Tulin was now—Irving's adjutant. Bosch stood still and waited. He looked around the kitchen, only the dim oven light on. With one hand he held the phone hard against his ear, the other he instinctively brought up to his stomach, where fear and dread were twisting together. He looked at the glowing numbers on the stove clock. It was almost two, five minutes past the last time he had looked at it. This isn't right, he thought as he waited. They don't do this by phone. They come to your door. They tell you this face to face.

    Finally, Irving picked up on the other end of the line.

    "Detective Bosch?"

    "Where is she? What happened?"

    Another moment of excruciating silence went by as Bosch waited. His eyes were closed now.

    "Excuse me?"

    "Just tell me, what happened to her? I mean . . . is she alive?"

    "Detective, I'm not sure what it is you are talking about. I'm calling because I need to muster your team as soon as possible. I need you for a special assignment."

    Bosch opened his eyes. He looked through the kitchen window into the dark canyon below his house. His eyes followed the slope of the hill down toward the freeway and then up again to the slash of Hollywood lights he could see through the cut of the Cahuenga Pass. He wondered if each light was someone awake and waiting for something or someone that wasn't going to come. Bosch saw his own reflection in the window. He looked weary. He could make out the deep circles etched beneath his eyes, even in the dark glass.

    "I have an assignment, Detective," Irving repeated impatiently. "Are you able to work or are you—"

    "I can work. I just was mixed up there for a moment."

    "Well, I'm sorry if I woke you. But you should be used to it."

    "Yes. It's no problem."

    Bosch didn't tell him that he hadn't been awakened by the call. That he had been roaming around in his dark house waiting.

    "Then get it going, Detective. We'll have coffee down here at the scene."

    "What scene?"

    "We'll talk about it when you get here. I don't want to delay this any further. Call your team. Have them come to Grand Street between Third and Fourth. The top of Angels Flight. Do you know where I'm talking about?"

    "Bunker Hill? I don't—"

    "It will be explained when you get here. Seek me out when you are here. If I am at the bottom come down to me before you speak with anyone."

    "What about Lieutenant Billets? She should—"

    "She will be informed about what is happening. We're wasting time. This is not a request. It is a command. Get your people together and get down here. Am I making myself clear to you?"

    "You're clear."

    "Then I will be expecting you."

    Irving hung up without waiting for a reply. Bosch stood with the phone still at his ear for a few moments, wondering what was going on. Angels Flight was the short inclined railroad that carried people up Bunker Hill in downtown—far outside the boundaries of the Hollywood Division homicide table. If Irving had a body down there at Angels Flight the investigation would at least initially fall under the jurisdiction of Central Division. If central detectives couldn't handle it because of caseload or personnel problems, or if the case was deemed too important or media sensitive for them, then it would be bumped to the bulls, the Robbery-Homicide Division. The fact that a deputy chief of police was involved in the case before dawn on a Saturday skewed things toward the latter possibility. The fact that he was calling Bosch and his team in instead of the RHD bulls was the puzzle. Whatever it was that Irving had working at Angels Flight didn't make sense.

    Bosch glanced once more down into the dark canyon, pulled the phone away from his ear and clicked it off. He wished he had a cigarette but he had made it this far through the night without one. He wouldn't break now.

    He turned his back and leaned on the counter.  He looked down at the phone in his hand, turned it back on and hit the speed dial button that would connect him with Kizmin Rider's apartment. He would call Jerry Edgar after he talked to her. Bosch felt a sense of relief come over him that he was reluctant to acknowledge. He might not yet know what awaited him at Angels Flight, but it would certainly take his thoughts away from Eleanor Wish.

    Rider's alert voice answered after two rings.

    "Kiz, it's Harry," he said. "We've got work."

     

    Chapter Two

    Bosch agreed to meet his two partners at the Hollywood Division station to pick up cars before they headed downtown to Angels Flight. On the way down the hill to the station he had punched in KFWB on his Jeep's radio and picked up a breaking news report on a homicide investigation underway at the site of the historical funicular railroad. The newsman on the scene reported that two bodies had been found inside one of the train cars and that several members of the Robbery-Homicide squad were on the scene. But that was the extent of the reporter's information as he also noted that the police had placed an unusually wide cordon of yellow tape around the crime scene, prohibiting him from getting a closer look. At the station Bosch communicated this bit of thin information to Edgar and Rider while they signed three slickbacks out of the motor pool.

    "So it looks like we're gonna be playing sloppy seconds to RHD," Edgar concluded, showing his annoyance at being rousted from sleep to spend probably the whole weekend doing gopher work for the RHD bulls. "Our guts, their glory. And we aren't even on call this weekend. Why didn't Irving call out Rice's got-damned team if he needed a Hollywood team?"

    Edgar had a point. Team One - Bosch, Edgar and Rider - wasn't even up on call rotation this weekend. If Irving followed proper call out procedure he would have called Terry Rice, who headed up Team Three, which was currently on top of the rotation. But Bosch already figured that Irving wasn't following any procedures, not if the deputy chief had called him directly before checking with his supervisor, Lt. Grace Billets.

    "Well, Jerry," Bosch said, more than used to his partner's whining, "you'll probably get the chance to personally ask the deputy chief those questions in a little while."

    "Yeah, right, I ask him one of those and I'll find my ass down in Harbor the next ten years. Fuck that."

    "Hey, Harbor Division's an easy gig," Rider said, just to rag Edgar a bit. She knew Edgar lived in the Valley and that a transfer to Harbor Division would mean a miserable ninety-minute commute each way—the pure definition of Freeway Therapy, the brass's method of unofficially punishing malcontents and problem cops. "They only pull six, seven homicides a year down there."

    "That's nice but count me the fuck out."

    "Okay, okay," Bosch said. "Let's just get going and we'll worry about all of that stuff later. Don't get lost."    

    Bosch took Hollywood Boulevard to the 101 and coasted down the freeway in minimal traffic to downtown. Halfway there he checked the mirror and saw his partners cruising in the lanes behind him. Even in the dark and with other traffic he could pick them out. He hated the new detective cars. They were painted black and white and looked exactly like patrol cruisers with the exception that they did not carry the emergency lights across the roof. It had been the former chief's idea to replace unmarked detective cars with the so-called slickbacks. The whole thing had been a scam perpetrated to fulfill his promises to put more cops on the street. By changing unmarked cars into clearly marked cars, he was giving the public the erroneous impression that there were more cops patrolling the streets. He also counted the detectives using slickbacks when he addressed community groups and proudly reported that he had increased the number of cops on the street by hundreds.

    Meantime, detectives trying to do their jobs drove around like targets.  More than once Bosch and his team had sought to serve an arrest warrant or had attempted to quietly come into a neighborhood in the course of an investigation only to have their presence signaled by their own cars. It was stupid and dangerous but it was the chief's edict and it was carried out throughout the department's divisional detective bureaus, even after the chief was not asked back for a second five-year term. Bosch, like many of the department's detectives, hoped the new chief would soon order the detective cars back to normal. Meanwhile, he no longer drove the car assigned to him home from work. It had been a nice detective supervisor's perk having a take-home car but he didn't want the marked car sitting in front of his house. Not in L.A. You never knew what menace that could bring to your door.

    They got to Grand Street by two-forty-five. As Bosch pulled to a stop he saw an unusually large number of police and related vehicles parked along the curb at California Plaza. He noted the crime scene and coroner's vans, several patrol cars and several more detective sedans—not the slickbacks, but the unmarked cars still used by the RHD bulls. While he waited for Rider and Edgar to pull up he opened his briefcase, took out the cellular phone and called his home. After five rings the machine picked up the call and he heard his own voice telling him to leave a message. He was about to click off but decided to leave a message.

    "Eleanor, its me. I've got a call out . . . but page me or call me on the cell phone when you get in so I know you're okay . . . Um, okay, that's it. Bye - oh, it's about two-forty-five right now. Saturday morning. Bye."

    Edgar and Rider had walked up to his door. He put the phone away and got out with his briefcase. Edgar, the tallest, held up the yellow crime scene tape and they crossed under, gave their names and badge numbers to a uniform officer with the crime scene attendance list, and then walked across California Plaza.

    The plaza was the centerpiece of Bunker Hill, a stone courtyard formed by the conjoining of two marble office towers, a high-rise apartment building and the Modern Museum of Art. There was a huge fountain and reflecting pool at its center, though the pumps and lights were off at this hour, leaving the water still and black.

    Past the fountain was the beaux-arts revival-styled station and wheelhouse at the top of Angels Flight. It was next to this small structure that most of the investigators and patrol officers milled about as if waiting for something. Bosch looked for the gleaming shaven skull that belonged to Deputy Chief Irving but didn't see it. He and his partners stepped into the crowd and moved toward the lone rail car sitting at the top of the tracks. Along the way he recognized many of the faces of Robbery-Homicide detectives. They were men he had worked with years earlier when he had been part of the elite squad. A few of them nodded to him or called him by name. Bosch saw Francis Sheehan, his former partner, standing off by himself, smoking a cigarette. Bosch broke from his partners and stepped over.

    "Frankie," he said. "What's going on?"

    "Harry, what are you doing here?"

    "Got called out. Irving called us out."

    "Shit. Sorry, partner, I wouldn't wish this one on my enemy."

    "Why, what's going—"

    "You better talk to the man first. He's putting the big blanket on this one."

    Bosch hesitated. Sheehan looked worn down but Bosch hadn't seen him in months. He had no idea what had put the dark circles under his hound dog eyes or when they had been cut into his face. For a moment Bosch remembered the reflection of his own face that he had seen earlier.

    "You okay, Francis?"

    "Never better."

    "Okay, I'll talk to you."

    Bosch rejoined Edgar and Rider who were standing near the rail car. Edgar nodded slightly to Bosch's left.

     "Hey, Harry, you see that?" he said in a low voice. "That's Sustain Chastain and that bunch over there. What are those pricks doin' here?"

    Bosch turned and saw the grouping of men from Internal Affairs.

    "Got no idea," he said.

    Chastain and Bosch locked eyes for a moment but Bosch didn't hold it. It wasn't worth the waste of energy to get worked up over just seeing the IAD man. Instead, he focused on trying to put the whole scene together. His curiosity level was at maximum. The number of RHD bulls hanging around, the IAD shines, a deputy chief on the scene—he had to find out what was going on.

    With Edgar and Rider behind him in single file, Bosch worked his way to the rail car. Portable lights had been set up inside and the car was lit up like somebody's living room. Inside, two crime scene techs were at work. This told Bosch that he was quite late arriving at the scene. The crime scene techs didn't move in until after the coroner's techs had completed their initial procedures - declaring victims dead, photographing the bodies in situ, searching them for wounds, weapons and identification.

    Bosch stepped to the rear of the car and looked through the open door. The technicians were at work around two bodies. A woman was sprawled on one of the stepped seats about midway through the car. She was wearing gray leggings and a white thigh-length T-shirt. A large flower of blood had blossomed on her chest where she had been hit dead center with a single bullet. Her head was snapped back against the sill of the window behind her seat. She had dark hair and features, her lineage obviously stretching somewhere south of the border. On the seat next to her body was a plastic bag filled with many items Bosch couldn't see. A folded newspaper protruded from the top of it.

    On the steps near the rear door to the car was the facedown body of a black man wearing a dark gray suit. From his viewpoint Bosch could not see the man's face and only one wound was visible—a through and through gunshot wound at the center of the victim's right hand. Bosch knew it was what would later be called a defensive wound in the autopsy report. The man had held his hand up in a futile attempt to ward off gunfire. Bosch had seen it often enough over the years and it always made him think about the desperate actions people take at the end. Putting a hand up to stop a bullet was one of the most desperate.

    Though the techs were stepping in and out of his line of sight, Bosch could look straight down through the inclined train car and down the track to Hill Street about three hundred feet below. A duplicate train car was down there at the bottom of the hill and Bosch could see more detectives milling about by the turnstiles and the closed doors of the Grand Central Market across the street.

    Bosch had ridden the incline railroad as a kid and had studied how it worked. He still remembered. The two matching cars were counter-balanced. When one went up the side by side tracks the other went down, and vice versa. They passed each other at the midpoint. He remembered riding on Angels Flight long before Bunker Hill had been reborn as a slick business center of glass and marble towers, classy condominiums and apartments, museums and fountains referred to as water gardens. Back then the hill had been a place of once grand Victorian homes turned into tired looking rooming houses. Harry and his mother had taken Angels Flight up the hill to look for a place to live.

    "Finally, Detective Bosch."

    Bosch turned around. Deputy Chief Irving stood in the open door of the little station house.

    "All of you," he said, signaling Bosch and his team inside.

    They entered a cramped room dominated by the large old cable wheels that once moved the train cars up and down the incline. Bosch remembered reading that when Angels Flight was rehabilitated a few years earlier after a quarter century of disuse, the cables and wheels had been replaced with an electric system monitored by computer.

    On one side of the wheel display was just enough room for a small lunch table with two folding chairs. On the other side was the computer for operating the trains, a stool for the operator and a stack of cardboard boxes, the top one open and showing stacks of pamphlets on the history of Angels Flight.

    Standing against the far wall, in the shadow behind the old iron wheels, his arms folded and his craggy sun-reddened face looking down at the floor, was a man Bosch recognized. Bosch had once worked for Captain John Garwood, commander of the Robbery-Homicide Division. He knew by the look on his face that he was very put out about something. Garwood didn't look up at them and the three detectives said nothing.

    Irving went to a telephone on the lunch table and picked up the loose handset. As he began talking he motioned to Bosch to close the door.

    "Excuse me, sir," Irving said. "It was the team from Hollywood. They are all here and we are ready to proceed."

    He listened for a few moments, said good-bye and hung up the phone. The reverence in his voice and his use of the word sir told Bosch that Irving had been talking to the chief of police. It was one more curiosity about the case.

    "All right, then," Irving said, turning around and facing the three detectives. "I am sorry to roust you people, especially out of rotation. However, I have spoken with Lieutenant Billets and as of now you have been cut free of the Hollywood rotation until we get this handled."

    "What exactly is this that we are handling?" Bosch asked.

    "A delicate situation. The homicides of two citizens."

    Bosch wished he would get to the point.

    "Chief, I see enough RHD people around here to investigate the Bobby Kennedy case all over again," he said, glancing at Garwood. "And that's not to mention the IAD shines hovering around the edges. What exactly are we doing here? What do you want?"

    "Simple," Irving said. "I am turning the investigation over to you. It is your case now, Detective Bosch. The Robbery-Homicide detectives will be withdrawing as soon as you people are brought up to speed. As you can see, you are coming in late. That's unfortunate but I think you will be able to overcome it. I know what you can do."

    Bosch stared at him blankly for a long moment, then glanced at Garwood again. The captain had not moved and continued to stare at the floor. Bosch asked the only question that could bring understanding to this strange situation.

    "That man and woman on the train car, who are they?"

    Irving nodded.

    "Were is probably the more correct word. Were. The woman's name was Catalina Perez. Who exactly she was and what she was doing on Angels Flight we do not know yet. It probably does not matter. It appears that she was just in the wrong place at the wrong time. But that will be for you to officially determine. Anyway, the man in there, he is different. That was Howard Elias."

    "The lawyer?"

    Irving nodded. Bosch heard Edgar draw in a breath and hold it.

    "This is for real?"

    "Unfortunately."

    Bosch looked past Irving and through the ticket window. He could see into the train car. The techs were still at work, getting ready to shut off the lights so they could laser the inside of the car. His eyes fell to the hand with the bullet wound through it. Howard Elias. Bosch thought about all of the suspects there would be. Many of them standing around outside at that very moment, watching.

    "Shit," Edgar said. "Don't suppose we could take a pass on this one, could we, Chief?"

    "Watch your language, Detective," Irving snapped, the muscles of his jaw bulging as he grew angry. "That is not acceptable here."

    "Look, Chief, all I'm sayin' is if you're looking for somebody to play department Uncle Tom, it ain't going to be - "

    "That has nothing to do with this," Irving said, cutting him off. "Whether you like it or not, you have been assigned to this case. I expect each of you to do it professionally and thoroughly. Most of all, I expect results, as does the Chief of Police. Other matters mean nothing. Absolutely nothing."

    After a brief silence, during which Irving's eyes went from Edgar to Rider and then to Bosch, the deputy chief continued.

    "In this department there is only one race," he said. "Not black or white. Just the blue race."

    Read More Show Less

    Interviews & Essays

    On Thursday, January 7th, barnesandnoble.com welcomed Michael Connelly to discuss ANGELS FLIGHT.


    Moderator: Welcome, Michael Connelly! Happy New Year to you. It's exhilarating to start the year discussing a work as thrilling as ANGELS FLIGHT, and we're happy you could join us this evening.

    Michael Connelly: Thank you.


    PFrizzle@aol.com from San Mateo, CA: Hi. You will be coming to my area at M Is for Mystery. Looking forward to seeing you again. You were here with BLOOD WORK when I first became acquainted with you, and I would like to know if the Harry Bosch series should be read in chronological order.

    Michael Connelly: My personal feeling is that it doesn't matter, but I know there are a lot of purists out there who think you must read them in order. I think the problem for reading them out of order would be minimal, because other than a few of the books, the stories do not connect at all.


    Peter Winch from Burlingame, CA: Once again, I shall unfortunately miss your appearance in the Bay Area, as I will be in Los Angeles. My question is: Do you have any plans to revisit the characters from THE POET at this time?

    Michael Connelly: I have plans to eventually revisit almost every character I have written about. At the moment I do not have a specific story for the characters in THE POET, but eventually I hope I will come up with a story that will allow me to revisit Jack McEvoy and Rachel Walling.


    Andy from Hoboken, NJ: In BLOOD WORK, you take a break from Harry Bosch, but he's back in ANGELS FLIGHT. Will Bosch factor into all of your future books, or will you use McCaleb again? What made you keep him out of the spotlight in BLOOD WORK?

    Michael Connelly: First of all, I like to take breaks from Harry Bosch in order to hopefully keep the character fresh. When I came up with the story for BLOOD WORK, I almost used Harry, but in the long run I decided to use a new character, because metaphorically speaking I think that Harry has a good heart, and I didn't want to write a story that needed him having a new one.


    Paul Kuzel from Nashville,TN: Is Harry Bosch based on someone you know or knew in California? Or is he a mix of several men? I love that ol crusty character. Thanks

    Michael Connelly: He is a mix of several real cops I have known as a reporter and fictional cops I have known as a reader.


    Marnie from Detroit, MI: I am reading ANGELS FLIGHT right now and really think you have woven a tight plot. I can't guess what will happen next. Just wondering whether or not you know who will commit a crime when you begin writing a book? Do you have all the answers in the beginning?

    Michael Connelly: I have the primary answers, but I don't start a book until I know what the final resolution will be -- who did it. Everything in between, I wing it as I am going.


    Jim Charter from Ames, IA: Hi, Michael. I just finished ANGELS FLIGHT and loved it, of course. I have to know, though, if you were just playing with us, or is Clint Eastwood really going to make BLOOD WORK?

    Michael Connelly: Your guess is as good as mine. Eastwood optioned the story last year and hired an Academy Award-winning screenwriter to adapt it. That is where it stands right now. In that respect the mention in ANGELS FLIGHT is fantasy.


    Melissa Burbank from San Diego, CA: Just curious why you included the interesting subplot of Harry Bosch ruminating over his wife? Was this to show a more human side of him? I love the character of Bosch. Thanks.

    Michael Connelly: I try to treat Harry as a metaphor for a city. So oftentimes in the books, you will notice that when the city is coming apart, so too is Harry. The last time this was done in my books was THE LAST COYOTE, which was set in the wake of the big earthquake we had. In my mind, at least, Harry and his house were symbolic of the city.


    Linda Kamin from Broward County, FL: First, I would like to tell you that I thought BLOOD WORK was one of the best books I ever read. I am a librarian with the county library system; if a patron wants to read books similar to yours, whom would you suggest?

    Michael Connelly: That is a hard question to answer. I try to be as unique as I can. I can tell you whom I like to read, so probably if they like me, they will like these people. They include Lawrence Block, James Lee Burke, Jan Burke, Robert Crais -- to name just a few.


    Pam D. from Chicago, IL: I was a lucky winner from your web site of your new book, ANGELS FLIGHT, so I won't give anything away. I like what you are doing with the relationship between Harry and Eleanor -- seems very appropriate. Which book did they originally meet in when she was an FBI agent? I've still yet to read the first few books....

    Michael Connelly: They meet in THE BLACK ECHO. They also connect again in TRUNK MUSIC.


    Gerald from New York: Hello, Mr. Connelly. I've read (and wanted to write) detective/crime fiction five years now. Can you describe your own writing process and list some of your influences? Thank you.

    Michael Connelly: My main rule is to write every single day, and it doesn't have to be a lot, but even if you are writing one paragraph a day you are at least thinking of the story, and that is the main thing, to keep your head in the story. I guess three primary influences would be: Raymond Chandler, Ross MacDonald, Joseph Wambaugh.


    Steven from Glendale, AZ: As I am reading ANGELS FLIGHT, I notice that there are references to the O. J. Simpson trial in it. Did you follow the "Trial of the Century" closely? What did you find interesting about the case as a writer, and what aspects of it inspired ANGELS FLIGHT?

    Michael Connelly: Obviously, I didn't follow the case too closely, but since I write at home most days, it was on the TV, and I would catch parts. The case doesn't influence me. As a former journalist in L.A., I was happy not to cover it. But the case obviously had an influence on the LAPD, and since I try to write accurately about the present-day police force, I try to take to take the influences of that case into my writing.


    Elizabeth from Boulder, CO: Congratulations on your best novel yet with ANGELS FLIGHT! I read that your next book was going to have a female lead character. I have always thought that you wrote strong, accurate women in your past books. I am curious, what made you decide to write about a woman now?

    Michael Connelly: Well, essentially I am taking a break from Harry Bosch again, and when I do that I try to challenge myself with doing something new. This time out the challenge is twofold: one, writing about a female protagonist and two, the female protagonist is a criminal. In the past I have always written from the police point of view, and the challenge is to make a person on the wrong side of the wall an interesting and sympathetic character.


    Jim from Ames, Iowa: Do you see ANGELS FLIGHT as your darkest work? Also, how carefully have you plotted the character of Deputy Chief Irving? He seems to me the most complex of characters.

    Michael Connelly: I think that ANGELS FLIGHT is my darkest work so far, and this in itself is a mystery to me, because it is not reflective of my own life. Becoming a father in the last couple years has made me the happiest I have been in my life, but here comes this very dark story, and I don't know why. As far as Irving goes, I have given him a lot of thought over the course of the books. In the other books he was more a caricature than a real character, so I have worked hard to swing him away from that and make him more real and more complex.


    Glenda from New Zealand: Have you ever profiled a killer -- in particular, a mass killer?

    Michael Connelly: If you mean in my books, no. As a journalist I had discussions with several murderers. Luckily, they were all in jail when they called me. I always found it fascinating to talk to these people. Some of it rubbed off in my books.


    Peter Winch from Burlingame, CA: How do the cops on the L.A. force feel about your writings, or do they read your fiction?

    Michael Connelly: I am not sure a whole lot of them read it. I think if I live this every day, the last thing I would want to do is read some amateur's take on it. But those I do hear from generally appreciate what I write.


    Julie Foreman from Melbourne, Australia: Thanks for your books, Michael, I really enjoy them. But I am a bit confused. Is Eleanor leaving Harry in ANGELS FLIGHT a connection to the start of THE LAST COYOTE, where Harry's wife has left him?

    Michael Connelly: What Eleanor has done is not exactly clear, and maybe it will become clearer in the next book. Remember, we see the story through Harry's eyes, and he is obviously confused about what is happening in his romantic life. As far as THE LAST COYOTE goes, there is no mention of a wife leaving Harry, because he wasn't married.


    Celine from New York: I am always bothered by how graphic police shows are on TV. I like the fact that your mysteries are well written and not overly bloody. Do you think it is necessary for violence to be more graphic on the screen to get the message across?

    Michael Connelly: I can only answer that from my personal view. I do not think it has to be so graphic on the screen or the page. I prefer stories in both mediums to leave a lot to the imagination. Unfortunately, sometimes the imagination can make things seem worse then they are. For example, my book THE POET has almost no violence on the page, but a lot of it is suggested. When that book came out I got a lot of bad reaction from readers who complained it was too violent. And yet the reality of what is in the book is really little violence.


    Pam D. from Chicago, IL: The character Howard Elias, who is murdered in ANGELS FLIGHT, seems to resemble a prominent black attorney. How much research did you have to do in understanding the racial tensions that you describe in the book?

    Michael Connelly: I think it would be hard to do research on racial tensions per se. I relied on my observations of living in L.A. and my experience as a reporter, particularly in being caught in the middle of the riots that occurred after the Rodney King trial. That was a very surrealistic experience that has stayed with me, and it was something that I wanted to attempt to capture in one of my books.


    Ellen Wood from Portland, OR: Would you rather have Harry Bosch or Jack McEvoy solve a case for you? How about Terrell McCaleb?

    Michael Connelly: That is a good question. I would probably vote for Harry because I think he has the most dogged determination of the trio.


    PFrizzle@aol.com from San Mateo, CA: I've already submitted a question, but am interested in your music.... Is it jazz? Harry Bosch listens to Coltrane, etc. How about you?

    Michael Connelly: In the books when there is music playing, that is pretty much what I was listening to when I wrote that section. I like jazz, but I also like blues. You notice in BLOOD WORK the music is blues, not jazz.


    Nedwick from Evanston, IL: Mike, while I love your fiction, have you thought about any nonfiction in the future? As a Pulitzer Prize winner, do you miss nonfiction?

    Michael Connelly: First of all, whatever fulfillment I got from journalism I am still getting in what I do now. I am trying to accurately report on what life is like in contemporary Los Angeles. And just a note -- while I was part of the staff at the Los Angeles Times that won a Pulitzer for covering the riots in 1992, there are literally dozens and dozens of reporters involved, so I don't go around saying I am a Pulitzer winner. Good luck with fatherhood, Nedwick!


    Colleen from Seattle, WA: With the failure of Bosch's marriage, will love be on the horizon for him in your next book?

    Michael Connelly: He might need some time to recover, but I think Harry will always have highs and lows because he is a searcher in his mission/job and in his personal life.


    Peter Winch from Burlingame, CA: In regard to Hollywood again, would you want to oversee the screenplay writing to ensure that the story doesn't change too much?

    Michael Connelly: Not really. I have made the decision to sell my stories to Hollywood, and therefore I will be accepting of the results, good or bad. The truth is that by the time I am done writing one of these stories, I am pretty tired of it, and I don't want to prolong my involvement with it.


    Julie from Melbourne, Australia: Michael, do you have any sources who assist you with LAPD techniques/issues, or do you rely on your experience as a reporter?

    Michael Connelly: What time is it in Australia? Thanks. Police techniques change pretty rapidly. What I normally do is write a story using the procedures I think would be used. This comes from experience and common sense. I then will ask friends/advisers on the force to read sections involving their particular expertise and tell me what I have got wrong. I can then choose to fix it, but often I don't, because I am a slave to the drama of the story, not accuracy of procedures. Oftentimes, being deadly accurate can be deadly boring. I have to find the middle ground.


    Oline from Fort Lauderdale, FL: Hey, Mike. I'm sure you are already working on your next book after ANGELS FLIGHT. Can you tell us what it might be about?

    Michael Connelly: It is called VOID MOON, which is an astrological term for a time of bad luck. It is about a female "hot prowler," a burglar of occupied dwellings. She goes to L.A. and burglarizes a hotel room, and then the trouble starts. I haven't finished writing it yet, but it will probably be out sometime next year.


    Bruce McConnachie from Pittsburgh, PA: Is there a type of crime/murder that you won't touch? You handled the racial issues well in ANGELS FLIGHT. Thanks

    Michael Connelly: I try never to say never. I wrote about a child killer in THE POET, and then after becoming a father I said I would never write about that again. Yet here in ANGELS FLIGHT there is a child's murder. Though it is a small part of the book, it is still at its core. Why I did this, I don't know. That is one of the mysteries of writing. Perhaps we write about our worst nightmares to keep them at arm's length.


    Chuck from Atlanta, GA: I ran Bouchercon in '93, and you were a great new writer and panelist. You have matured greatly. What new projects would you like to tackle in the writing field? Best wishes.

    Michael Connelly: As far as new projects, I think the one I just outlined about challenging myself -- in what I consider new ways of writing -- is for the moment keeping me busy.


    Janine from San Francisco, CA: Do you have a favorite among your books? BLOOD WORK is mine. Thanks!

    Michael Connelly: Yes. ANGELS FLIGHT is my favorite. I think writers routinely say their current book is their favorite, but until this THE LAST COYOTE was my favorite.


    Clay Banks from Toledo, OH: What have been some of the highlights of your career?

    Michael Connelly: I guess holding my first book, THE BLACK ECHO, making the New York Times bestseller list for BLOOD WORK, and meeting President Clinton are big highlights, but probably more fulfilling is some of the feedback I have gotten from readers, which is always something to cherish. Booksellers too.


    Jennifer from Chicago, IL: Which of your contemporaries --mystery/thriller -- do you most admire? And which thriller do you wish you had written because it is so brilliant?

    Michael Connelly: The thriller is easy -- RED DRAGON by Thomas Harris. It is probably the most influential thriller in the last quarter century in my opinion. I like different writers for different reasons. Lawrence Block makes the stories flow so easily for the reader. I really admire George P. Pelecanos because of his research and detail. I thought his book THE SWEET FOREVER was one of the best I have read in a long time. A new writer I really admire is Barbara Serenella, whose book NO OFFENSE INTENDED I liked a lot. There are many others, and whenever I get asked a question like this I know I leave a lot out. I would be better off not answering!


    Julie from Melbourne Australia: It's 11:40am here and the middle of a great summer. Do you have any plans to come here in the near future?

    Michael Connelly: I was just there in September on a book tour. I had a great time, but I am not sure when I will be able to get back.


    Moderator: It was enlightening chatting with you this evening, Michael Connelly. You are a pleasure to host online, and we hope you'll be joining us again soon. Any final comments for the online audience?

    Michael Connelly: Thanks for joining in tonight and reading the books. As I said before, that is the real highlight of what I do.


    Read More Show Less

    Customer Reviews

    Average Rating 4
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    (37)

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    (16)

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    See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 150 Customer Reviews
    • Posted June 24, 2011

      La tia julia

      Mario vargas llosa

      2 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Posted October 28, 2013

      more from this reviewer

      Reviewed by Stephen Brayton for Readers' Favorite A lawyer who

      Reviewed by Stephen Brayton for Readers' Favorite

      A lawyer who makes his living by bringing lawsuits against the Los Angeles police department and a bystander are shot on one of the Angels Flight trolley cars. Detective Hieronymus Bosch and his team get called out of rotation to run the investigation. The city is, again, starting to heat up, as the lawyer, Howard Elias, was black. Even from the beginning, Bosch discovers no end of suspects. Besides the seemingly endless string of potentially vindictive cops, Elias had a girlfriend and, also, was involved in pornography - both print and online. Elias' philandering brings in a motive for his wife and son. Bosch has to wade through the evidence while at the same time not get sucked into office politics. One of the cases Elias was working on centered around a black man accused of killing a white child. Bosch finds indications that Elias knew the real killer's identity. The case, however, is not the only thing affecting Bosch's emotions. He also has to deal with his failing marriage of just over a year because his wife is addicted to gambling.

      Connelly's Bosch mysteries are guaranteed to include excellent police procedure, intrigue, police politics, and that one special clue that breaks open the investigation, even when the case looks solved. Angels Flight is no exception. When those in charge named the killer, I knew the story had more to offer. I knew Bosch had yet to conclude the case. I've enjoyed Connelly mysteries for many years. There's never a disappointing moment and each chapter brought something new that kept me guessing. Connelly's style is such that I felt as if I stood next to Bosch throughout the entire few days, seeing what he saw and feeling his emotions. Every Bosch novel is a winner and I look forward to the next one.

      1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Posted December 28, 2012

      Great book until....

      This was probably the bes Bosch story until the end. It seemed rather sudden without much explanation.

      1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    • Anonymous

      Posted November 2, 2012

      Highly recommend

      If you love detective stories Harry Bosch is one of the BEST! Angles Flight is great but I highly recommend if you read this series begin with the first one. I started with number 10 and had to go back and read all of them. I am now on 11. (They are so good I read number 10 about two months ago).

      1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    • Posted February 12, 2011

      more from this reviewer

      Another Great Connelly Read

      The Bosch series just continues to get better with each book. I thought Angels Flight started out just a little slow, but once the pace picked up, it really got rolling. Connelly is a master at this genre, developing believeable plot and side storylines and producing characters with depth. I have no intention of stopping here - gonna keep reading all the Bosch books in order.

      1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted July 20, 2014

      Good read!!!

      Bosch continues as my favorite detectives ever!!

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted May 12, 2014

      Maybe the best yet!

      I am an avid reader of this series, and have read almost all of the available books. This one is fast flowing, easy to read, believable, and most importantly, definitely a five-star rating! In my opinion...maybe the best one yet! Highly recommend!

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted March 15, 2014

      Library

      Library

      0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted December 10, 2013

      Another a Great One!

      I love the Harry Bosch series and this book is no exception. Michael Connellly is a brilliant author and one if my favorites!

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted October 4, 2013

      Love all his books. They are thrillers!

      Lots of twists and turns

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted September 28, 2013

      Dark Forest kit sister

      (Kk wat should our names b? Wat do we look like?)

      0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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    • Anonymous

      Posted September 28, 2013

      To Below

      (Yeah, you can be my sister!) I already have a mom, she's a cat from StarClan.

      0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted September 27, 2013

      Raccoonkit

      Pads in.

      0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Posted August 2, 2013

      Buy it....you'll enjoy it

      It was well written. Keeps moving at a good pace. I like Connelly's
      books.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted July 15, 2013

      Vivian to whisper

      "Hey i brought down to deer lets go home ok?" She grabed one deer and trotted back to camp

      0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    • Anonymous

      Posted July 12, 2013

      Rue

      Smiles, and bites the buck in the nck before Whisper can even blink. "Oh, probably you."

      0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    • Anonymous

      Posted July 10, 2013

      Matrix

      She felt grateful and leaned on him a bit. She remained quiet on the walk back to camp.

      0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    • Anonymous

      Posted July 15, 2013

      Whisper

      Brings te other back.

      0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    • Anonymous

      Posted June 23, 2013

      Firesky

      Legendary res seven.

      0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    • Posted April 24, 2013

      I am currently reading all of Michael Connelly's Harry Bosch ser

      I am currently reading all of Michael Connelly's Harry Bosch series in order, and I LOVE them. I am a big mystery/detective story fan, and I have tried so many different series from different authors, but I finally found the one for me! What can I say? I often find myself not really liking the main characters in novels, but I truly like Harry; he is a good guy - not perfect, but he works hard, isn't a womanizer, and isn't overly macho. All of the stories are well-written, realistic, contain surprises and twists, and keep me hooked until the very end. My favorites have been The Black Echo (#1), The Concrete Blonde (#3), Trunk Music (#5), City of Bones (#8), The Narrows (#10), although again - I enjoyed all of them. If you like detective mystery novels, you won't be disappointed with Michael Connelly and Harry Bosch.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 150 Customer Reviews

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