×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Angels in America, A Gay Fantasia on National Themes: Perestroika
     

Angels in America, A Gay Fantasia on National Themes: Perestroika

4.2 20
by Tony Kushner
 

See All Formats & Editions

The second half of Kushner's Pulitzer Prize-winning epic steers the characters introduced in Millennium Approaches from the opportunistic 1980s to a new sense of community in the 1990s, as they struggle to overcome catastrophic loss. Scheduled to open on Broadway and at London's Royal National Theatre this fall.

Overview

The second half of Kushner's Pulitzer Prize-winning epic steers the characters introduced in Millennium Approaches from the opportunistic 1980s to a new sense of community in the 1990s, as they struggle to overcome catastrophic loss. Scheduled to open on Broadway and at London's Royal National Theatre this fall.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal - Library Journal
The same masterful writing that won Kushner the 1993 Pulitzer Prize for Drama for Millenneum Approaches (Part 1 of Angels, Theatre Communications Grp., 1993) is carried forward here. Capable of being understood as a self-contained play, Perestroika continues from the final scene of Millenneum, wherein an angel had crashed through the ceiling of young Prior's apartment. One is shocked, moved, touched, and saddened yet ultimately uplifted by this delightful story involving the angel, Prior, and six other mortal characters. Kushner uses his humor and wit to show the harshness, fear, and sadness that surrounds anyone touched by AIDS. Prior's closing statement, spoken to the audience, speaks for this play as well: "This disease will be the end of many of us, but not nearly all, and the dead will be commemorated and will struggle on with the living, and we are not going away. We won't die secret deaths anymore. The world only spins forward. We will be citizens. The time has come. Bye now. You are fabulous creatures, each and every one." Essential for contemporary drama collections.-H. Robert Malinowsky, Univ. of Illinois, Chicago

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781559360722
Publisher:
Theatre Communications Group
Publication date:
11/28/1993
Edition description:
Part 2
Pages:
128
Product dimensions:
5.67(w) x 8.80(h) x 0.70(d)

Meet the Author

Tony Kushner's plays include A Bright Room Called Day and Slavs!; as well as adaptations of Corneille's The Illusion, Ansky's The Dybbuk, Brecht's The Good Person of Szecguan and Goethe's Stella. Current projects include: Henry Box Brown or The Mirror of Slavery; and two musical plays: St. Cecilia or The Power of Music and Caroline or Change. His collaboration with Maurice Sendak on an American version of the children's opera, Brundibar, appeared in book form Fall 2003. Kushner grew up in Lake Charles, Louisiana, and he lives in New York.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Angels in America: A Gay Fantasia on National Themes (20th Anniversary Edition) 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 20 reviews.
Heather Tankersley More than 1 year ago
Of course this play is offensive. It is real. The issues are relevent. The characters are realistic. The emotions are real. It can be crude and a bit in your face at times, but it needs to be! That is the point. Not for the easily offended, but a great play for the rest of us. Kushner was trying to say something, trying to make a statement, and he certainly made a big one with this play. Adored it
Guest More than 1 year ago
I am participating in a reading of this play with an informal theatre company at my college, and I am already deeply moved and affected by this story. It's crude at times, but everything the author did was done for a reason. The subject matter is not a flower-potpourri type of subject matter. It's raw and real, and that's exactly what this book is: raw and real. I'd give it six stars if I could.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is one of the best plays that i have read hands down! If you take the times to analize how Kushner took the time to write the dual character it makes the play 5 times better. Kushner is one of the best playwriters out there. He has inspired, touch, and changed lives over and over again.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Funny, Rude, Real! This book is amazing, opening up eyes and hearts to some problems of being homosexual or closeted homosexual. I would recommend this book to anyone!!! Very very good!!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Selections from a paper I wrote about this play. If you want the whole thing, email me--- The type of play we often call an ¿issues play¿ is difficult to write. Obviously, a social issue is examined by a playwright through a story involving characters affected by and affecting the specific issue. The issue must be dealt with both frankly and sensitively, seriously yet with a touch of humor, and realistically while still remaining universal enough for all audiences. Tony Kushner fails to find these delicate balances in his thoroughly obnoxious Angels in America Part 1: Millennium Approaches. Kushner tries to be sensitive, but ends up only looking like he is clumsily and unashamedly digging for pity. As for frankness, Kushner lacks not. To show us the extent of Prior¿s disease, Kushner feels the need to strip him completely down on stage. Again, Kushner is basically evoking pity, saying ¿look at this poor man! This is what homophobic white male supremacists have done to us!¿ Kushner has no problems remaining serious. He deals with a serious disease, a man¿s serious denial, and many other very, very serious issues. His problem is finding the humor. His script is a series of stilted, melodramatic scenes lightened with only awkward and supposedly comedic moments. They are only funny in the sense that the writing is so laughably bad. Is Angels in America realistic? Well, if you are a conservative straight white male who has never had any contact with homosexuality, you would think so. All the gay men are depicted as promiscuous ¿queen¿ types who cry and complain about everything. One thing Kushner does do right is explore many aspects of homosexuality through an array of characters. The characters are just completely one-dimensional and irksome. Probably the worst thing about the play was the incessant complaining. Never did a character overcome something and end up stronger. Even in the end, where we assume Joe and Louis end up together, one can only assume that it will end badly with Joe returning to the closet because of his religion and Louis not waiting around for him. All the characters are fundamentally weak. I apologize for speaking so negatively of such a renowned play, but I found it dull, preachy, whiny, and downright offensive. I understand the significance of this work. It was the very first play to explore these issues, which was the sole reason it won awards. Kushner, in reality, needs to examine his writing significantly. Had I not known Kushner was gay, I would have thought a straight male wrote this play to show what terrible people homosexuals are, to justify all the reasons they are to be scorned and hated, and to explain why God would send his angels to kill them off first. But, people love issues plays. They love to be able to read a play and feel like humanity has hope. The fact that Angels in America won the Pulitzer Prize does not give me much.