Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780099526773
Publisher:
Knopf Publishing Group
Publication date:
10/28/2010

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Angels of Destruction 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Rupert_My_Love More than 1 year ago
"Angels of Destruction," in its entirety, maintains this slightly undeveloped aura about it; there are gaps in the plot that are not revisited nor concluded by the end, and what are assumed to be key plot elements (for example the cult 'Angels of Destruction' itself) are, in fact, secondary and unimportant. So why mention them at all? And why title the novel after an element mentioned only in passing? Although the ambiguousness of the little girl is blatantly intentional, her story is somehow lacking and her departure, even more so, is rushed and anticlimactic; in fact, that word sums up the entire ending as well.... Either way, Keith Donohue is an accomplished and detailed writer who pays special homage to the landscape of his novels. While "Stolen Child" remains the better of his two novels, "Angels of Destruction" is worth a go.
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harstan More than 1 year ago
In 1985 in wintry Pennsylvania nine year old Norah knocks on the door of lonely widow Margaret Quinn. The older woman lets the frozen waif inside, but is surprised to learn the child insists she does not have parents and has always been on her own. Norah explains that she needed shelter from the cold night and saw the light in Margaret¿s home. Margaret excitedly allows Norah to stay; feeling redemption as her own daughter Erica as a teen ran away a decade ago to the West Coast with her boyfriend to join the radical Angels of Destruction.

Margaret and Norah agree that Norah will masquerade her as her granddaughter. Norah enters the school and becomes friends with a student Sean whose dad abandoned him. When Norah begins to insist she is an angel with a destructive message, some fear her while others revel in her seemingly magical happiness. However, one person in the shadows has followed her from before and struggles with what to do about her.

Obviously the bond between Margaret and Norah is the center of the tale as they even convince the older woman¿s skeptical sister that the child is her grand-niece. Using flashbacks, readers learn what happened to Erica on the road west. However, the key to the story line that keeps reader¿s attention is who Norah truly is and what is her mission in Pennsylvania.

Harriet Klausner