ANGLO-AMERICAN PHILOSOPHY

ANGLO-AMERICAN PHILOSOPHY

by Guido De Ruggiero
     
 

Scanned, proofed and corrected from the original edition for your reading pleasure. (Worth every penny!)*** Contents: PART I. EMPIRICISM AND NATURALISM -- § 1. Hamilton And Mansel, § 2 John Stuart Mill, § 3. The Logic Of Empiricism, § 4. The Ethics Of Empiricism, § 5. The Metaphysic Of Empiricism: Spencer, § 6. The Theory Of… See more details below

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Scanned, proofed and corrected from the original edition for your reading pleasure. (Worth every penny!)*** Contents: PART I. EMPIRICISM AND NATURALISM -- § 1. Hamilton And Mansel, § 2 John Stuart Mill, § 3. The Logic Of Empiricism, § 4. The Ethics Of Empiricism, § 5. The Metaphysic Of Empiricism: Spencer, § 6. The Theory Of Science, § 7. Pragmatism, § 8. Logistic, § 9. Hodgson's Critical Empiricism. -- PART II IDEALISM -- § 1. The Neo-Hegelian Movement, § 2. The Hegelian Right: Green, § 3. Bradley, § 4. The History Of Religions, § 5. The Hegelian Left, § 6. American Hegelianism: Royce, § 7. Summary. *** An excerpt from the beginning of: PART I. EMPIRICISM AND NATURALISM. § 1. Hamilton And Mansel. The empiricism which we have seen in Germany and France concealed with such varying degrees of success and under so many different disguises has in England maintained its genuine form and enjoyed full consciousness of its own true character. Attempts have certainly been made to disguise it; but these have been both rare and unsuccessful, and have never concealed for long the real nature of the underlying thought. England, of course, is the classical land of empiricism, the country of Bacon, Locke and Hume. From Hume a long succession of English empiricists carried on the tradition unchallenged and unopposed; but this very lack of opposition resulted in sterility and stagnation. The empiricist tradition progressed, so to speak, by mere vis inertia, or rather by the sedimentary stratification of new data on the old, of a new evolutionism deposited on the top of the old sensationalism. There is no true development of thought: in Hume the historical function of empiricism is completed and its highest point of originality attained. In the person of this thinker, the greatest ever born on British soil, European philosophy burnt its boats. The hopes of ingenuous dogmatism were finally shattered and no other road remained for thought except that of idealism. Hume's critical analysis of knowledge has a purely negative value; it simply emphasizes in unmistakable terms the necessity for a real solution of the problem. But once this pure negation is stiffened into a rigid and positive system, once the demand is mistaken for a conclusion, the value of empiricism is gone, and nothing remains but one of the many forms of naturalistic dogmatism which base themselves on an intellectual vacuum. For this reason we cannot consider modern English empiricism as a continuation of classical empiricism. If we must call it a continuation, it is only in the sense in which night is the continuation of day: the light vanishes, and everything else remains. The true continuation of Bacon and Hume's empiricism is to be found in the idealism of Kant and Hegel. In the philosophy of Bentham and Mill and Spencer, thought fails to maintain its circular movement, the true movement which follows the orbit of reality through the grades of perfection ; it continues to move, so to speak, along the tangent, in a monotonous and uniform continuity which contains in itself no ground of deviation, and therefore only deviates under the impact of external forces. And, in fact, the new empiricism is devoid of any originality: all speculative interest has vanished, and there only remains the rigid form of classical empiricism swollen in bulk by external accretions. Its apparent originality is just this process of sedimentation, this extension of its field of action as a result of the introduction of new elements from the natural sciences and from all the different aspects of modern civilization and culture. But its speculative level is unchanged; and hence arises a certain clumsiness in the hypertrophied mass of material and a kind of incongruity in the farrago of heterogeneous facts which this philosophy has succeeded in amassing. This is where English positivism differs from that of other nations, inasmuch as it has applied more conscientiously the formula of Baconian positivism— first collect facts and then draw inductions—and it has therefore become more clumsy and ponderous. The tastes and traditions of the Latin peoples have seldom if ever permitted such an encyclopedic amassing of information, and their applications of the positivist formula have almost always ended in empty words; hence the comparative ease with which, in these countries, positivism is being eliminated at the present moment. In England, on the other hand, where the tendency of thought towards minute analytical observation of fact favours the work of compilation...

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940011983061
Publisher:
OGB
Publication date:
12/22/2010
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
0 MB

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