Animal Babies in Polar Lands

Animal Babies in Polar Lands

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by Editors of Kingfisher
     
 

Polar bears, harp seals, and caribou are just a few of the delightful youngsters found in Animal Babies in Polar Lands. The unusual yet engaging animals are a great introduction to an unfamiliar region.

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Overview

Polar bears, harp seals, and caribou are just a few of the delightful youngsters found in Animal Babies in Polar Lands. The unusual yet engaging animals are a great introduction to an unfamiliar region.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Four Animal Babies titles feature close-up photos of the different offspring in the wild along with a couple of clues.
Publishers Weekly
Four Animal Babies titles feature close-up photos of the different offspring in the wild along with a couple of clues, then ask the question, "Who is my mommy?" Turning the page, readers get the photographic answer as well as a bit of information about the lives and habits of the creatures shown. One example in Animal Babies in Polar Lands shows a close-up with this clue "I have flippers instead of legs. They help me swim very quickly in cold water" a flip of the page reveals a seal. The other titles: Animal Babies in Rain Forests; Animal Babies in Grasslands; and Animal Babies in Ponds and Rivers. (May) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
The "Animal Babies" series takes children on a journey through ponds and rivers, polar lands, and grasslands. In this edition, the reader is introduced to animal babies in polar lands. The book features amazing full-color photographs of a harp seal, wolf, albatross, caribou, penguin, walrus, and polar bear along with their young in their natural habitat. Each animal baby is introduced with a photograph and text providing a clue unique to this particular animal. The book then attempts to engage the reader by asking, "Who is my mommy?" The answer is provided on the next page, along with a photo of the baby with her mother and text providing an additional fun fact. However, while the pictures are excellent and the animal facts clearly researched well, this particular question can be confusing to a young child. An adult will understand that the format is necessary to teach the different names given to the young of different species, a caribou baby is a fawn while an albatross baby is called a chick, for example. But asking a young reader this question will likely be more puzzling than intriguing. 2004, Kingfisher Publications, Ages 2 to 5.
—Kris Sauer
Children's Literature - Sharon Salluzzo
Babies and toddlers will meet animals of the north and south poles. The seal, wolf, albatross, penguin, walrus, and polar bear are included. For each, the animal sound is represented and there is mention of a distinctive feature. An up-close picture shows the baby animal's face. The next page shows its mother, tells what kind of animal she is and what the baby is called. For example: "My mommy is a polar bear. I am her cub. In the winter my mommy and I sleep together in a den underneath the snow. Do you like taking naps with your mommy?" The high quality photos, some of which are from National Geographic, are engaging and interesting. Toddlers and preschoolers are introduced to the animals in their natural habitats, including a fascinating photo of an albatross chick in the nest under its mother. Part of the "Animal Babies" series, this is a good vocabulary builder for babies. In addition, the interactive component whereby toddlers and preschoolers can identify each animal makes this a very good purchase.
School Library Journal
PreS-K-In each volume, Schofield introduces seven animals from a particular habitat. The text accompanying a close-up photo of a baby animal gives clues to its identity and poses the question, "Who is my mommy?" The next spread reveals the answer and shows an equally engaging photo of mother and baby. Although most children won't be able to identify creatures such as an albatross (Polar), capybaras (Ponds), or tarsiers (Rain Forests) the first time through, they will be able to answer the question on rereading. The striking photographs will engage young browsers and are definitely the books' strongest feature. Among the volumes' puzzling aspects are random variations in the type size with no discernible pattern. Even more inexplicable is the use of a red-eyed tree frog in Ponds. These tropical frogs are definitely photogenic, but because they spend most of their lives well above the water, their inclusion is somewhat misleading. The other two books are serviceable additions.-Kathy Piehl, Minnesota State University, Mankato Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780753457559
Publisher:
Kingfisher
Publication date:
05/13/2004
Series:
Animal Babies Series
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.59(w) x 7.92(h) x 0.38(d)
Age Range:
3 - 5 Years

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