Animal Rights and Pornography

Animal Rights and Pornography

4.7 4
by J. Eric Miller
     
 


Miller grew up in a cabin in the woods of Colorado and the experience of the silence, darkness and depth that grows from being raised in near solitude is evident throughout his stories, laced with the wildness, rage, and tranquility that exists in the crags of the mountains. The stories include tales of strippers, of their husbands and lovers and the helpless, ill…  See more details below

Overview


Miller grew up in a cabin in the woods of Colorado and the experience of the silence, darkness and depth that grows from being raised in near solitude is evident throughout his stories, laced with the wildness, rage, and tranquility that exists in the crags of the mountains. The stories include tales of strippers, of their husbands and lovers and the helpless, ill-placed desire that is shot out of their customers, of a rape by a man of another man at a peep show in Times Square, the victim wordlessly accepting what happens to him while watching a woman dance behind glass, of fucking a woman wearing a fur coat and feeling unexplainable rage at her disregard of animal life. The story ends with the character running away into the night with the coat, "as if an animal rescued." In "Invisible Fish," a night clerk in a mall pet store tortures the animals at night until the whole place stinks of fear and rage. Dumbfounded, the store owners blugeon to death a chimpanzee, the only animal in the store that can imagine capable of such atrocities.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781932360332
Publisher:
Soft Skull Press, Inc.
Publication date:
07/10/2004
Series:
Soft Skull ShortLit
Pages:
90
Product dimensions:
4.58(w) x 7.50(h) x 0.34(d)

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Animal Rights and Pornography 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read one of the author¿s stories, called Invisible Fish, on an online publication a few months ago and my experience with it compelled me to buy the book. Miller seems fascinated with the incongruous nature of people. He raises the idea in the Pride of Lions of living outside of nature but after reading this work, it made me question if the very contradictions we shun, the darkness we turn away from, and the shadows where real life actually takes place isn¿t more actual nature than the contrived faces we show the rest of the world. Some of the stories in this book are so dark that I had to stop reading, but Miller writes with such truth that the most disturbing moments for me occurred when I saw myself in the shadows he created.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Yes, it made me think. But it made me think about things I don't really want to think about. A female friend of mine gave this to me and said she found some of the stories 'a turn on'. I don't see how that could be as they were all but a few pretty twisted and somewhat mean spirited. The author is trying to make a point about animal suffering and human suffering. I tried to get more insight into it by visiting his web site, which was interesting but didn't elaborate. There was a link to a review that helped put the collection in some kind of perspective. I'm not sure even yet I got out of it the point I was supposed to get, but I recommend it anyway because it really got in my mind, especially a few of the stories like 'Food Chain' and 'John School' and 'In the Pride of Lions'. I recommend it the way I'd recommend doing anything dangerous. You don't always want to be in that position and you ought to be in the right frame of mind before you go there. But going there I think is somewhat interesting. I was reading this on a plane and was very careful not to let the person on each side of me see the text. I guess that tells you something.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Animal Rights and Pornography goes to extremes I¿ve rarely seen non-gratuitous fiction go. Linking the idea of animal rights issues and issues that have to do with exploitation in the human flesh trade is an interesting strategy and in J Eric Miller¿s work feels like a rather rich one. Miller doesn¿t seem to be so much offering up a mantra about the way things should be but is rather focusing on the way they are so that the stories don¿t feel like solutions but descriptions of problems. The book should probably come with a warning, because although these stories are literary in nature, the bulk of them are quite hard core; the stories aren¿t quite as graphic as the work of the Marquis De Sade, but they can be pretty graphic. You¿ve got a variety of rapes (man against man; man against mermaid; women against man); prostitution; incest; and a lot of blood. If you can take it, it¿s worth the read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I loved these stories though they didn't make me feel good. Some of them I kept reading for the same reason you keep looking at the scene of an accident: to see what terrible thing might be next. There were plenty of terrible things. It is a hypnotic read.