Animal Social Complexity: Intelligence, Culture, and Individualized Societies

Overview

For over 25 years, primatologists have speculated that intelligence, at least in monkeys and apes, evolved as an adaptation to the complicated social milieu of hard-won friendships and bitterly contested rivalries. Yet the Balkanization of animal research has prevented us from studying the same problem in other large-brained, long-lived animals, such as hyenas and elephants, bats and sperm whales. Social complexity turns out to be widespread indeed. For example, in many animal societies one individual's ...

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Overview

For over 25 years, primatologists have speculated that intelligence, at least in monkeys and apes, evolved as an adaptation to the complicated social milieu of hard-won friendships and bitterly contested rivalries. Yet the Balkanization of animal research has prevented us from studying the same problem in other large-brained, long-lived animals, such as hyenas and elephants, bats and sperm whales. Social complexity turns out to be widespread indeed. For example, in many animal societies one individual's innovation, such as tool use or a hunting technique, may spread within the group, thus creating a distinct culture. As this collection of studies on a wide range of species shows, animals develop a great variety of traditions, which in turn affect fitness and survival.

The editors argue that future research into complex animal societies and intelligence will change the perception of animals as gene machines, programmed to act in particular ways and perhaps elevate them to a status much closer to our own. At a time when humans are perceived more biologically than ever before, and animals as more cultural, are we about to witness the dawn of a truly unified social science, one with a distinctly cross-specific perspective?

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780674018235
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • Publication date: 9/28/2005
  • Pages: 640
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Frans B. M. de Waal is C. H. Candler Professor of Primate Behavior in the Psychology Department and Director of Living Links, part of the Yerkes Primate Center, Emory University.

Peter L. Tyack is Senior Scientist, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

William McGrew is Professor of Anthropology and Zoology at Miami University (Ohio).

Susan Perry is Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Carel van Schaik is Professor and Director of the Anthropological Institute and Museum, University of Zürich.

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Table of Contents

Preface

Part I. Life History and Brain Evolution

1. Life History and Cognitive Evolution in Primates
Carel P. van Schaik and Robert O. Deaner

Case Study 1A. Sociality and Disease Risk: A Comparative Study of Leukocyte Counts in Primates
Charles L. Nunn

2. Dolphin Social Complexity: Lessons from Long-Term Study and Life History
Randall S. Wells

3. Sources of Social Complexity in the Three Elephant Species
Katy Payne

Part II. Evolution of Cooperative Strategies

4. Complex Cooperation among Taï Chimpanzees
Christophe Boesch

Case Study 4A. Coalitionary Aggression in White-Faced Capuchins
Susan Perry

Case Study 4B. Levels and Patterns in Dolphin Alliance Formation
Richard C. Connor and Michael Krützen

5. The Social Complexity of Spotted Hyenas
Christine M. Drea and Laurence G. Frank

Case Study 5A. Maternal Rank "Inheritance" in the Spotted Hyena
Anne Engh and Kay E. Holekamp

6. Is Social Stress a Consequence of Subordination or a Cost of Dominance?
Scott Creel and Jennifer L. Sands

Case Study 6A. Sperm Whale Social Structure: Why It Takes a Village to Raise a Child
Sarah L. Mesnick, Karen Evans, Barbara L. Taylor, John Hyde, Sergio Escorza-Treviño, and Andrew E. Dizon

Part III. Social Cognition

7. Equivalence Classification as an Approach to Social Knowledge: From Sea Lions to Simians
Ronald J. Schusterman, Colleen Reichmuth Kastak, and David Kastak

8. The Structure of Social Knowledge in Monkeys
Robert M. Seyfarth and Dorothy L. Cheney

9. Social Syntax: The If-Then Structure of Social Problem Solving
Frans B. M. de Waal

Case Study 9A. Conflict Resolution in the Spotted Hyena
Sofia A. Wahaj and Kay E. Holekamp

Part IV. Communication

10. Laughter and Smiling: The Intertwining of Nature and Culture
Jan A. R. A. M. van Hooff and Signe Preuschoft

Case Study 10A. Emotional Recognition by Chimpanzees
Lisa A. Parr

11. Vocal Communication in Wild Parrots
Jack W. Bradbury

Case Study 11A. Representational Vocal Signaling in the Chimpanzee
Karen I. Hallberg, Douglas A. Nelson, and Sarah T. Boysen

12. Social and Vocal Complexity in Bats
Gerald S. Wilkinson

13. Dolphins Communicate about Individual-Specific Social Relationships
Peter L. Tyack

Case Study 13A. Natural Semanticity in Wild Primates
Klaus Zuberbühler

Part V. Cultural Transmission

14. Koshima Monkeys and Bossou Chimpanzees: Long-Term Research on Culture in Nonhuman Primates
Tetsuro Matsuzawa

Case Study 14A. Movement Imitation in Monkeys
Bernhard Voelkl and Ludwig Huber

15. Individuality and Flexibility of Cultural Behavior Patterns in Chimpanzees
Toshisada Nishida

Case Study 15A. Sex Differences in Termite Fishing among Gombe Chimpanzees
Stephanie S. Pandolfi, Carel P. van Schaik, and Anne E. Pusey

16. Ten Dispatches from the Chimpanzee Culture Wars
W. C. McGrew

Case Study 16A. Spontaneous Use of Tools by Semifree-ranging Capuchin Monkeys
Eduardo B. Ottoni and Massimo Mannu

17. Society and Culture in the Deep and Open Ocean: The Sperm Whale and Other Cetaceans
Hal Whitehead

Case Study 17A. Do Killer Whales Have Culture?
Harald Yurk

18. Discovering Culture in Birds: The Role of Learning and Development
Meredith J. West, Andrew P. King, and David J. White

References

Acknowledgments

Contributors

Index

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