Animal, Vegetable, or Woman?: A Feminist Critique of Ethical Vegetarianism

Animal, Vegetable, or Woman?: A Feminist Critique of Ethical Vegetarianism

by Kathryn Paxton George
     
 

Challenges current claims that humans ought to be vegetarians because animals have moral standing.

Kathryn Paxton George challenges the view held by noted philosophers Tom Regan and Peter Singer and ecofeminists Carol Adams and Deane Curtin who assume the Principle of Equality to argue that no one should eat meat or animal products. She shows how these

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Overview

Challenges current claims that humans ought to be vegetarians because animals have moral standing.

Kathryn Paxton George challenges the view held by noted philosophers Tom Regan and Peter Singer and ecofeminists Carol Adams and Deane Curtin who assume the Principle of Equality to argue that no one should eat meat or animal products. She shows how these renowned individuals also violate the Principle of Equality, because they place women, children, adolescents, the elderly, and many others in a subordinate position. She reviews the principal arguments of these major ethical thinkers, offers a detailed examination of the nutritional literature on vegetarianism, and shows how this inconsistency arises and why it recurs in every major argument for ethical vegetarianism. Included is her own view about what we should eat, which she calls “feminist aesthetic semi-vegetarianism.”

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“George has presented original, often compelling, arguments against ethical vegetarianism. Relying on well-researched evidence of nutritional and material differences among humans based on age, gender, race, class, and cultural location, George shows respects in which current arguments for vegetarianism falsely presuppose a male physiological norm and ideal. This book is necessary reading for animal rights advocates, feminists, ethicists, or anyone else interested in interconnected health and ethical issues concerning vegetarianism.” — Karen J. Warren, author of Ecofeminist Philosophy: A Western Perspective on What It Is and Why It Matters

“This broadly provocative book should be controversial, worthy of being attacked on several fronts. It is central to two large topics: feminist philosophy and the moral status of animals. It will not be the last word on any of the controversial issues that it touches upon, but it is unequivocally the next word.” — Paul B. Thompson, author of Food Biotechnology in Ethical Perspective

Booknews
George (philosophy, U. of Idaho) challenges animal rights/vegetarian views held by philosophers, Tom Regan and Peter Singer, and by ecofeminists, Carol Adams and Deane Curtin, asserting that these thinkers do not fully consider the nutritional needs of those in other cultures and classes, and of women, children, adolescents, and the elderly. So, for example, while George and her husband have chosen vegetarianism for themselves, they do not restrict their daughter's diet, nor would they assert to anyone a moral obligation to become a vegetarian. George believes there are, nonetheless reasons, especially nutritional, to become a vegetarian and even a vegan, just not moral reasons. An intriguing book this: one written by a feminist philosopher vegetarian discounting the feminist and philosophical foundation of a practice she came to, and remains with, through feminist, vegetarian philosophy. For George, veganism is only an ideal diet under conditions of plenty, robust health, an appropriate age, and an appropriate body condition. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780791446881
Publisher:
State University of New York Press
Publication date:
12/28/2000
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
236
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.60(d)

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