Animals in Fall: Preparing for Winter

Overview

Honk! Geese are flying south. Grr! Black bears are looking for a den. Munch! Deer are eating extra food. Find out what other animals do to get ready for winter. What happens in fall? Find out in the Fall's Here! series, part of the Cloverleaf Books™ collection. These nonfiction picture books feature kid-friendly text and illustrations to make learning fun!

Read More Show Less
... See more details below
Paperback
$6.05
BN.com price
(Save 12%)$6.95 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (6) from $1.99   
  • New (4) from $4.20   
  • Used (2) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

Honk! Geese are flying south. Grr! Black bears are looking for a den. Munch! Deer are eating extra food. Find out what other animals do to get ready for winter. What happens in fall? Find out in the Fall's Here! series, part of the Cloverleaf Books™ collection. These nonfiction picture books feature kid-friendly text and illustrations to make learning fun!

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Anne Pechnyo
Animals prepare for winter in many ways. Some migrate, some hibernate, and some change their coats in order to ready themselves for the cold weather ahead. Readers of this text are shown animals such as gray whales, monarch butterflies, rattlesnakes, and snowshoe hares, and they are introduced to the actions each animal takes to prepare for winter. While Rustad utilizes third-person voice for the factual text, the first and last pages show an unnamed narrator who speaks in first-person about the end of fall. Each two-page spread begins with an onomatopoeia describing an animal, and then informs the reader about the animal's preparations for winter. A red fall leaf on each spread gives the reader more factual information about the animals. Rustad combines kid-friendly language with onomatopoeias, making the text easy to follow. Enright's simple illustrations are sure to captivate young readers. The table of contents, a glossary, and an index serve well to teach primary students about text features in nonfiction. Included at the end of the book is an easy experiment about blubber. This is a part of the "Cloverleaf Books: Fall's Here!" series. Reviewer: Anne Pechnyo
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780761385066
  • Publisher: Lerner Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 9/28/2011
  • Series: Fall's Here! Series
  • Pages: 24
  • Sales rank: 311,645
  • Age range: 5 - 8 Years
  • Lexile: 530L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 9.30 (w) x 9.50 (h) x 0.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Martha E. H. Rustad is the author of nearly one hundred nonfiction children's books, on topics ranging from snowflakes to termites to Ancient Babylon. She lives with her family in Brainerd, Minnesota.

Amanda Enright is an illustrator from West Sussex in the United Kingdom. Previous projects include No More Pacifiers from Piggy Toes Press. She is the illustrator of all titles in the Fall Themes set of Cloverleaf Books.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 23, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Great for introducing autumn season to preschoolers

    I read Animals in Fall with my four year old granddaughter who is just grasping the time concepts of seasons, repeating days of the week, months, etc. Since they live in the country and have an exposure to animals she quickly understood that squirrels gather food and bears hibernate, but I liked that the book also covered whales swimming farther south and butterfly migrating. When I was a school librarian young children often felt that "true" or nonfiction books had to have photographs. This book does not and in a way I like that. The colorful illustrations clearly illustrate each concept. Nice addition to book collections on seasons and autumn.

    This book would also make a good nonfiction choice for the primary classrooms for independent reading. I received a copy of this book for review purposes, but all opinions are my own.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 26, 2011

    This is an excellent book that describes what happens to animals as they prepare for winter ...

    A boy and a girl, all bundled up for the cool fall weather, watch some ants crawl along the ground. A raccoon is out of sight nearby as he has curled up in his nearby den in preparation for the long winter ahead. A cool breeze shakes some colorful leaves from the trees and the boy wonders what will happen to the animals as winter approaches. They "know cool weather and shorter days mean summer is over." Fall is the time to make preparations for winter, but not all animals do not all do the same thing. Some like the gray whale in Alaska prepare for their long journey to to Mexico and "they live off [their] blubber as they migrate." The monarch butterflies and the Canada geese make their own preparations to head south.

    Some animals prepare to sleep through the winter and search for safe dens to nestled into. Before the black bears head to their dens to hibernate they "gobble fruits and nuts in the fall" and "gain as much as 30 pound (14 kilograms) each week." In this book you'll be amazed when you see how rattlesnakes prepare to hibernate. Another way that some animals make themselves ready for winter is to change. Snowshoe hares have brown hair in the fall, but in the winter "they must be white to match the snow" in order to protect themselves from predators. You will also learn what the white-tail deer does in the fall to make sure he is ready for winter.

    This is an excellent book that describes what happens to animals as they prepare for winter. As a beginning nonfiction chapter book the dialogue is simple and presented in large print. The illustrations are full page, are of high interest, and are presented in a picture book format, a format that makes the transition to the chapter book easier. Additional information can be found in leaf-shaped sidebars. For example, we find that "A flock of Canada geese often flies the same route each year. It also stops to rest in the same place." In the back of the book is an index, a glossary, a "Blubber Gloves Activity," and additional recommended book and website resources to explore.


    This book courtesy of the publisher.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)