Animals in Translation: Using the Mysteries of Autism to Decode Animal Behavior

( 56 )

Overview

I don't know if people will ever be able to talk to animals the way Doctor Doolittle could, or whether animals will be able to talk back. Maybe science will have something to say about that. But I do know people can learn to "talk" to animals, and to hear what animals have to say, better than they do now. —From Animals in Translation

Why would a cow lick a tractor? Why are collies getting dumber? Why do dolphins sometimes kill for fun? How can a parrot learn to spell? How did ...

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Animals in Translation: Using the Mysteries of Autism to Decode Animal Behavior

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Overview

I don't know if people will ever be able to talk to animals the way Doctor Doolittle could, or whether animals will be able to talk back. Maybe science will have something to say about that. But I do know people can learn to "talk" to animals, and to hear what animals have to say, better than they do now. —From Animals in Translation

Why would a cow lick a tractor? Why are collies getting dumber? Why do dolphins sometimes kill for fun? How can a parrot learn to spell? How did wolves teach man to evolve? Temple Grandin draws upon a long, distinguished career as an animal scientist and her own experiences with autism to deliver an extraordinary message about how animals act, think, and feel. She has a perspective like that of no other expert in the field, which allows her to offer unparalleled observations and groundbreaking ideas.

People with autism can often think the way animals think, putting them in the perfect position to translate "animal talk." Grandin is a faithful guide into their world, exploring animal pain, fear, aggression, love, friendship, communication, learning, and, yes, even animal genius. The sweep of Animals in Translation is immense and will forever change the way we think about animals.

*includes a Behavior and Training Troubleshooting Guide
 
Among its provocative ideas, the book:

  • argues that language is not a requirement for consciousness—and that animals do have consciousness
  • applies the autism theory of "hyper-specificity" to animals, showing that animals and autistic people are so sensitive to detail that they "can't see the forest for the trees"—a talent as well as a "deficit"
  • explores the "interpreter" in the normal human brain that filters out detail, leaving people blind to much of the reality that surrounds them—a reality animals and autistic people see, sometimes all too clearly
  • explains how animals have "superhuman" skills: animals have animal genius
  • compares animals to autistic savants, declaring that animals may in fact be autistic savants, with special forms of genius that normal people do not possess and sometimes cannot even see
  • examines how humans and animals use their emotions to think, to decide, and even to predict the future 
  • reveals the remarkable abilities of handicapped people and animals 
  • maintains that the single worst thing you can do to an animal is to make it feel afraid
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Editorial Reviews

The Oprah Magazine - O
"Grandin's focus in Animals in Translation is not on all the 'normal' things autistics and animals can't do but on the unexpected, extraordinary, invaluable things they can."
From the Publisher
PRAISE FOR ANIMALS IN TRANSLATION

"Neurology has Oliver Sachs, nature has Annie Dillard, and the lucky animal world has Grandin, a master intermediary between humans and our fellow beasts . . . Animals is one of those rare books that elicits a 'wow' on almost every page. A."—Entertainment Weekly

"Inspiring . . . Crammed with facts and anecdotes about Temple Grandin's favorite subject: the senses, brains, emotions, and amazing talents of animals."—The New York Times Book Review

Entertainment Weekly
"Neurology has Oliver Sachs, nature has Annie Dillard, and the lucky animal world has Grandin, a master intermediary between humans and our fellow beasts . . . At once hilarious, fascinating, and just plain weird, Animals is one of those rare books that elicits a 'wow' on almost every page. A."
The New York Times Book Review
"Inspiring . . . Crammed with facts and anecdotes about Temple Grandin's favorite subject: the senses, brains, emotions, and amazing talents of animals."
the Oprah Magazine O
"Grandin's focus in Animals in Translation is not on all the 'normal' things autistics and animals can't do but on the unexpected, extraordinary, invaluable things they can."
Publishers Weekly
Philosophers and scientists have long wondered what goes on in the minds of animals, and this fascinating study gives a wealth of illuminating insights into that mystery. Grandin, an animal behavior expert specializing in the design of humane slaughter systems, is autistic, and she contends that animals resemble autistic people in that they think visually rather than linguistically and perceive the world as a jumble of mesmerizing details rather than a coherent whole. Animals-cows, say, on their way through a chute-are thus easily spooked by novelties that humans see as trivialities, such as high-pitched noises, drafts and dangling clothes. Other animals accomplish feats of obsessive concentration; squirrels really do remember where each acorn is buried. The portrait she paints of the mammalian mind is both alien and familiar; she shows that beasts are capable of sadistic cruelty, remorse, superstition and surprising discernment (in one experiment, pigeons were taught to distinguish between early period Picasso and Monet). Grandin (Thinking in Pictures) and Johnson (coauthor of Shadow Syndromes) deploy a simple, lucid style to synthesize a vast amount of research in neurology, cognitive psychology and evolutionary biology, supplementing it with Grandin's firsthand observations of animal behavior and her own experiences with autism, engaging anecdotes about how animals interact with each other and their masters, and tips on how to pick and train house pets. The result is a lively and absorbing look at the world from animals' point of view. (Jan.) Forecast: Anyone who's enjoyed the work of Jeffrey Moussaieff Masson-and especially those who liked it but felt it a bit warm and fuzzy in spots-should appreciate this valuable, rigorous book. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
A high-functioning autistic, Grandin (animal science, Colorado Sate Univ., Thinking in Pictures) has spent a lifetime empathizing with animals. She has also served as a consultant to farmers, ranchers, and slaughterhouses, helping them understand animals and their behavior in order to make their care (and/or slaughter) more humane. Grandin's new book on animal behavior draws on her experiences as both a scientist and an autistic person. Her compelling thesis is that there is a lot we still don't know about animal thought and learning but that her condition provides her with an insight into the issues that other people lack. Autism, Grandin argues, closely mimics the psychological condition of animals, in part because both lack facility with language. Indeed, she asserts that animals are autistic savants whose intelligence is unseen by most people. Grandin deals with wildlife only in passing, but she details some interesting laboratory studies using wild animals. A provocative title for universities and larger public libraries. [See Prepub Alert, LJ 9/1/04.]-Alvin Hutchinson, Smithsonian Inst. Libs., Washington, DC Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780156031448
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
  • Publication date: 1/2/2006
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 372
  • Sales rank: 85,946
  • Lexile: 1130L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 5.30 (w) x 7.90 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Temple Grandin

TEMPLE GRANDIN earned her Ph.D. in animal science from the University of Illinois, went on to become an associate professor at Colorado State University, and wrote two books on autism, including the seminal Thinking in Pictures. She lives in Fort Collins, Colorado.

CATHERINE JOHNSON, Ph.D., is a writer specializing in neuropsychiatry and the brain and is the author of three previous books. She lives in New York.

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Read an Excerpt

People who aren’t autistic always ask me about the moment I realized I could understand the way animals think. They think I must have had an epiphany.
 
But it wasn’t like that. It took me a long time to figure out that I see things about animals other people don’t. And it wasn’t until I was in my forties that I finally realized I had one big advantage over the feedlot owners who were hiring me to manage their animals: being autistic. Autism made school and social life hard, but it made animals easy.
 
I had no idea I had a special connection to animals when I was little. I liked animals, but I had enough problems just trying to figure out things like why a really small dog isn’t a cat. That was a big crisis in my life. All the dogs I knew were pretty big, and I used to sort them by size. Then the neighbors bought a dachshund, and I was totally confused. I kept saying, “How can it be a dog?” I studied and studied that dachshund, trying to figure it out. Finally I realized that the dachshund had the same kind of nose my golden retriever did, and I got it. Dogs have dog noses.
 
That was pretty much the extent of my expertise when I was five. I started to fall in love with animals in high school when my mother sent me to a special boarding school for gifted children with emotional problems. Back then they called everything “emotional problems.” Mother had to find a place for me because I got kicked out of high school for fighting. I got in fights because kids teased me. They’d call me names, like “Retard,” or “Tape recorder.” They called me Tape Recorder because I’d stored up a lot of phrases in my memory and I used them over and over again in every conversation. Plus there were only a few conversations I liked to have,  so that amplified the effect. I especially liked to talk about the rotor ride at the carnival. I would go up to somebody and say, “I went to Nantasket Park and I went on the rotor and I really liked the way it pushed me up against the wall.” Then I would say stuff like, “How did you like it?” and they’d say how they liked it, and then I’d tell the story all over again, start to finish. It was like a loop inside my head, it just ran over and over again. So the kids called me Tape Recorder.
 
Teasing hurts. The kids would tease me, so I’d get mad and smack ’em. That simple. They always started it, they liked to see me react. My new school solved that problem. The school had a stable and horses for the kids to ride, and the teachers took away horseback riding privileges if I smacked somebody. After I lost privileges enough times I learned just to cry when somebody did something bad to me. I’d cry, and that would take away the aggression. I still cry when people are mean to me.
 
Nothing ever happened to the kids who were teasing. The funny thing about the school was, the horses had emotional problems, too. They had emotional problems because in order to save money the headmaster was buying cheap horses. They’d been marked down because they had gigantic behavior problems. They were pretty, their legs were fine, but emotionally they were a mess. The school had nine horses altogether, and two of them couldn’t be ridden at all. Half the horses in that barn had serious psychological problems. But I didn’t understand that as a fourteen-year-old. So there we all were up at boarding school, a bunch of emotionally disturbed teenagers living with a bunch of emotionally disturbed animals. There was one horse, Lady, who was a good horse when you rode her in the ring, but on the trail she would go berserk. She would rear, and constantly jump around and prance; you had to hold her back with the bridle or she’d bolt to the barn. Then there was Beauty. You could ride Beauty, but he had very nasty habits like kicking and biting while you were in the saddle. He would swing his foot up and kick you in the leg or foot, or turn his head around and bite your knee. You had to watch out. Whenever you tried to mount Beauty he kicked and bit—you had both ends coming at you at the same time.
Y: GrotesqueMT-Condensed; mso-bidi-font-family: GrotesqueMT-Condensed" 
But that was nothing compared to Goldie, who reared and plunged whenever anyone tried to sit on her back. There was no way to ride that horse; it was all you could do just to stay in the saddle. If you did ride her, Goldie would work herself up into an absolute sweat. In five minutes she’d be drenched, dripping wet. It was flop sweat. Pure fear. She was terrified of being ridden. Goldie was a beautiful horse, though; light brown with a golden mane and tail. She was built like an Arab horse, slender and fine, and had perfect ground manners. You could walk her on a lead, you could groom her, you could do anything you liked and she was perfectly behaved just so long as you didn’t try to ride her. That sounds like an obvious problem for any nervous horse to have, but it can go the other way, too. I’ve known horses where people say, “Yeah you can ride them, but that’s all you can do with them.” That kind of horse is fine with people in the saddle, and nasty to people on the ground.
 
All the horses at the school had been abused. The lady they bought Goldie from had used a nasty, sharp bit and jerked on it as hard as she could, so Goldie’s tongue was all twisted and deformed. Beauty had been kept locked in a dairy stanchion all day long. I don’t know why. These were badly abused animals; they were very, very messed up.
 
But I had no understanding of this as a girl. I was never mean to the horses at the school (other kids were sometimes), but I wasn’t any horse-whispering autistic savant, either. I just loved the horses. I was so wrapped up in them that I spent every spare moment working the barns. I was dedicated to keeping the barn clean, making sure the horses were groomed. One of the high points of my high school career was the day my mom bought me a really nice English bridle and saddle. That was a huge event in my life, because it was mine, but also because the saddles at school were so crummy. We rode on old McClellands, which were honest-to-god cavalry saddles first used in the Civil War. The school’s saddles probably went back to World War II when they still had some horse units in the army. The McClelland was designed with a slot down the center of it to spare the horse’s back. The slot was good for the horse but horrible for the rider. I don’t think there’s ever been a more uncomfortable saddle on earth, though I have to say that when I read about the Northern Alliance soldiers in Afghanistan riding on saddles made out of wood, that sounded worse. Boy did I take care of that saddle. I loved it so much I didn’t even leave it in the tack room where it belonged. I brought it up to my dorm room every day and kept it with me. I bought special saddle soap and leather conditioner from the saddle shop, and I spent hours washing and polishing it.
 
As happy as I was with the horses at school, my high school years were hard. When I reached adolescence I was hit by a tidal wave of anxiety that never stopped. It was the same level of anxiety I felt later on when I was defending my dissertation in front of my thesis committee, only I felt that way all day long and all night, too. Nothing bad happened to make me so anxious all of a sudden; I think it was just one of my autism genes kicking into high gear. Autism has a lot in common with obsessive-compulsive disorder, which is listed as an anxiety disorder in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual. Animals saved me. One summer when I was visiting my aunt, who had a dude ranch in Arizona, I saw a herd of cattle being put through the squeeze chute at a neighboring ranch. A squeeze chute is an apparatus vets use to hold cattle still for their shots by squeezing them so tight they can’t move. The squeeze chute looks like a big V made out of metal bars hinged together at the bottom. When a cow walks into the chute an air compressor closes up the V, which squeezes the cow’s body in place. The rancher has plenty of space for his hands and the hypodermic needle between the metal bars. You can find pictures of them on the Web if you want to see what they look like.
 
As soon as I caught sight of that thing I made my aunt stop the car so I could get out and watch. I was riveted by the sight of those big animals inside that squeezing machine. You might think cattle would get really scared when all of a sudden this big metal structure clamps together on their bodies, but it’s exactly the opposite. They get really calm. When you think about it, it makes sense, because deep pressure is a calming sensation for just about everyone. That’s one of the reasons a massage feels so good—it’s the deep pressure. The squeeze chute probably gives cattle a feeling like the soothing.
 
Copyright © 2005 by Temple Grandin and Catherine Johnson
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.
 
Requests for permission to make copies of any part of the work should be mailed to the following address: Permissions Department, Harcourt, Inc., 6277 Sea Harbor Drive, Orlando, Florida 32887-6777.

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Table of Contents

Chapter 1: My Story
 
Chapter 2: How Animals Perceive the World
 
Chapter 3: Animal Feelings
 
Chapter 4: Animal Aggression
 
Chapter 5: Pain and Suffering
 
Chapter 6: How Animals Thinks
 
Chapter 7: Animal Genius: Extreme Talents
 
Behavior and Training Troubleshooting Guide
Notes
Selected Biography
Acknowledgments
Index

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 56 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(29)

4 Star

(14)

3 Star

(7)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(5)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 56 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 22, 2008

    Fantastic, whether you agree with slaughterhouses or not

    I knew about Temple Grandin, but I had never seen her or her books. Then I read this. It was really eye-opening for me. There was not a single page that didn't teach me something new, which is a very rare event for me. Heck, I read 'A Brief History of Time' and didn't learn as much as I have reading this. For everything I've read about autism (and experienced), I still received new insights into the good and bad involved (as well as the strange, like opiates), as well as theories behind it. Then, of course, is the stuff about animals. Now THAT was eye-opening. There was so much about how animals think and behave that I never would have even thought of thinking of (probably inattentional blindness). But it all makes sense. It has made me better able to understand animals, which is vital for people to know nowadays, now that we rely on machines more and animals less. But in fact, it's at least partially repaired my relationship with my cat, who would generally avoid me and my bear-hugs. Now I pet her and understand her and the way she works better, so I can work with her instead of against her. There's just so much to learn in this book that I don't think you even should be allowed to have animals without this book. Oh, and by the way, death is an inherent part of life. Death happens all the time. Just because we cause it (in the times that we do) doesn't make it any more wrong. As much as people argue that breeding animals to eat them is unnatural, humans have been doing it for centuries. And anyways, it'd be impossible to not do anything to any animals. We are a part of their world just as much as they are part of ours. The best we can do is to change what we can, and help them with what we cannot change. More animals live when we love and understand them than if we we stop breeding them or release them into the wild. The difference between you and Temple Grandin is not that she assists brutal murders of animals and you don't. It's just that she does the little things to change our and their world for the better, and you don't. Sorry if that's a little harsh, but Temple Grandin is a visionary among animal researchers, and if you're too stubborn to read how to better communicate and co-exist with animals, then you obviously don't care about animals as much you think.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 14, 2006

    A real eye-opener. Phenomenal!

    This book is packed with information and provides a new window on ourselves as well as the world of animals. One of the most unusual and compelling books I have read.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 13, 2005

    NOT what's expected...

    For the true animal lover/healer this book leaves out something that's needed most...mutual respect and compassion for EVERY animal. She tends to talk to much about how to better the ability to get cattle around within the boundries of the slaughter fields that they are made to live in. What's compassionate about that? I agree, everyone interested in healing animals needs to read this book, and then move on from it and find another way to create an actual world where all animals are loved and cared for. I respect her for her own journey it's just not how so many animal care workers feel.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2010

    A MUST READ for those looking to understand their pet or animal friend.

    Temple Grandin's book "Animals in Translation" is highly enlightening to any pet or animal owner. The book reads as an authoritative text, quoting studies and research. For the light reader it may be overwhelming, but for a person looking to truly understand their pet or the animals they manage it's a MUST READ. A truly extraordinary lady, Temple's insight and life's work benefit us all and "Animals in Translation" is an excellent addition to the animal lover's library.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 19, 2009

    Captivating read!

    Having a grandchild diagnosed with autism, I was curious to see what the author had to say regarding the similarities that she found between autistics and animals. Uncharacteristically, I found her empathetic and compassionate and enormously inciteful. I would recommend this book to anyone who has a curiosity in the dynamics of animal behavior but especially, how a woman such as Temple has overcome and succeeded so profoundly in her field of journalism. It was a fascinating read.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 9, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Interesting read, whether you're intrigued by animals or not

    Temple Grandin, through her own autism, reveals extraordinary personal insight into the thoughts and responses of animals . . . and of humans.

    Based on credible scientific research, but easy to read and understand. If you've ever felt a special connection to animals, this book will enhance that relationship. If not, it's likely to change the way you see and relate to animals in the future.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 11, 2007

    Read it 3 times

    As an animal trainer I would highly recommend this book. I just found it very interesting. Each time I re-read it, I learn more. Temple Grandin has done her research and has a wealth of knowledge to share. She understands animals in a way few others can.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 4, 2007

    Autism/Aspergers Favorite

    For those who were born onto the Autism Spectrum or is related to someone who was, Dr. Temple Grandin tells it like it is from our perspective. If your boss is on the spectrum, it should be required reading.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 26, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    A Unique Look at the Mind of a Dog!

    Temple Grandin gives us her unique perspective on what may be going on the mind our dogs. For me, Dr. Grandin stands on a very short list of authors giving us some scientific insight into dog psychology.

    I've had dogs all my life, but have recently become involved in the rescue of breeder dogs (with Delaware Valley Golden Retriever Rescue - www.dvgrr.org). These dogs have been neglected and abused for their entire lives and present us with the challenge of helping them to become "normal" dogs.

    Dr. Grandin's concept that animals (and autistics) "think in pictures" is difficult to comprehend, yet goes a long way in getting me out of my word-based thought process when dealing with unusual or unwanted behaviors. Trying to see the world through the eyes of a dog makes me appreciate just how amazing our relationship with them is!

    This is a must read for all serious animal lovers.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 26, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    An Inspirational Book

    The insights into animal behavior that Dr. Grandin gives in this book have been invaluable to my career as a dog trainer, pet behavior counselor and an educator. In all of my obedience classes, I reference Animals in Translation and explain how animals think in pictures. This concept helps people to better understand their dogs, and to troubleshoot and find resolutions to behavior problems leading to a better relationship. This book has become my bible and serves as an inspiration that I can accomplish my dreams just as Dr. Grandin has overcome so much in her life of challenges to help the animals.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 18, 2009

    Very Interesting

    I've been very involved with animals and cruelty cases for the last 10 years and this book has given me a new insight as to how the animal brain works. It makes so much more sense to me now as to why animals do the things they do. It's alot to "wrap your head around" parden the pun, but is very interesting. As far as the "killing of cattle", that's a fact of life and has been for years. It's not a matter of compassion.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 3, 2006

    Great for anyone with sleep problems

    The best thing about this book was that it was so dry and boring that it helped me fall asleep on a nightly basis. Three pages and my eyes would start closing. Being a counselor and an animal lover, I thought this book would be extremely interesting and insightful however, I felt like I was reading one of my psychology textbooks. Take this one out of the library. Don't waste your money on it.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 5, 2006

    Read this for what it is, not what you hope

    If there ever was an agenda-free author that tells it straight, it is Temple Grandin. Simple insights into both human and animal behavior are laid out in great detail, and I've been able to gain invaluable knowledge about the wiring and workings of my autistic niece and relate them to my own experience. I've read how other reviewers have carried their own biases to the reading and denounce the author for her work with the livestock industry. However, there can be no doubt that Temple Grandin's influence has greatly reduced animal pain, fear and suffering.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 28, 2006

    Fascinating insight...

    This book was recommended by Costco book reviewer. I found it absolutely fascinating! A guide in understanding animals and humans...much can be put to practical use. Our new puppy, Sir Rufus II will benefit from my having read this book!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 1, 2006

    Dont judge a book by its cover..

    I stumbled upon this book while browsing and found it to be highly recomended by the local book store which is why I bought it... Oops.. I assumed id learn the mysteries of animal behaviors or at least something meaningful..The mumbo jumbo about frontal lobes and amygdalas I can certainly live without..I just thought it would be a meaningful book and it simply wasnt..

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 9, 2006

    Designer of death

    I almost bought this book, but borrowed a copy to read. I have no intention of contributing to the income of a designer of slaugherhouses. Temple Grandin can claim no love or understanding of animals if she has studied their killing in such detail. There is no such thing as humane slaughter. If slaughter houses had glass walls, you would all be vegetarian. Unfortunately, Grandin still enjoys eating animals, and exploits them further by writing about the 'slaughter experience.' It isn't her throat being cut.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 16, 2005

    The Guide for Returning to a State of Grace with Animals

    It's not just sad, but tragic, that as we mature we lose the instinctive gift of communicating with animals we have as children. Temple's book returns us to that extraordinary ability. Amazingly readable, considering some of the hard-to-get-your-neocortex-around concepts presented, this book holds startling insights on every page. A lifetime of working with animals, both as passion and as profession, didn't teach me what 'Animals in Translation' did, and already I've employed several of her principles in working with animals (including humans). This should be mandatory reading for anyone who lives or works among, with, or near animals. Temple and Catherine, thanks for the tremendous gift you've just given us -- and our animals.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 12, 2005

    Fascinating book

    What a great book for animal lovers and people lovers! Written in a simple style, yet it is so unique and compelling. Author's observations of animals - especially dogs - are incredibly humane and meticulous. And so correct! I have two dogs and this book has just assured me I was right about them ¿ they do have feelings and they know more than we realize. Dogs do make us human.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 23, 2014

    I just finished this amazing book & plan to read it again.

    I just finished this amazing book & plan to read it again. It is PACKED with information & Ms Grandin's insights, ideas & opinions. You don't have to agree with all of those opinions but you will agree the information she offers is fantastic. Gives me an open-eyed look at our fellow beings. If you are a dog owner/lover you already have a feeling there is a lot more going on than we humans can perceive. This book confirms that.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2012

    Fascinating book

    Temple Grandin's insightful explanation of how animals think is an absolute must for anyone who interacts in any way with animals.

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