Animated Origami Faces by Joel Stern, NOOK Book (eBook) | Barnes & Noble
Animated Origami Faces

Animated Origami Faces

by Joel Stern
     
 

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Blending the art of paperfolding with the magic of animation, this fun and fascinating book will help origami enthusiasts at every skill level create twelve delightful faces filled with movement and life. Using ordinary letter-size paper, anyone can make lively three-dimensional faces with blinking eyes, snapping jaws, and wiggling ears:
• Talking

Overview

Blending the art of paperfolding with the magic of animation, this fun and fascinating book will help origami enthusiasts at every skill level create twelve delightful faces filled with movement and life. Using ordinary letter-size paper, anyone can make lively three-dimensional faces with blinking eyes, snapping jaws, and wiggling ears:
• Talking Bird
• Masked Super Hero
• Blowfish
• Elephant
• Dog
• Monkey
...and more!
With this simple method of paperfolding, no tools or glues are required. Just follow the easy step-by-step diagrams, accompanied by tons of helpful tips on technique, and crystal clear illustrations. An inspiring way to create homemade masks, this unique guide also includes suggestions for creating your own movable models, letting crafters mix and match features to invent new and unusual origami species!

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780486149004
Publisher:
Dover Publications
Publication date:
03/15/2012
Series:
Dover Origami Papercraft
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
48
File size:
4 MB
Age Range:
12 Years

Read an Excerpt

ANIMATED ORIGAMI FACES


By JOEL STERN

Dover Publications, Inc.

Copyright © 2007 Joel Stern
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-0-486-14900-4



CHAPTER 1

Models with Mouths and Eyes that Open and Shut


The models in this section share these features:

* They're constructed from perpendicular cross-pleats.

* They fold up like a fan or accordion.


A pleat is the result of folding the paper back and forth such that one portion overlaps another; a cross-pleat is when you first pleat the paper in one direction (left-right), and then with those folds in place, you pleat the paper in the other direction (up-down).

The instructions at the beginning of this section detail how to crease the model into equal divisions; those at the end assume you know how to do this, so they simply indicate how many divisions to make.

A good practice is to fold all horizontal creases in both directions, that is, as valley- and mountain-folds. That way, it will be easier to make your pleats go either way in later steps. Also, the first time you make a model with many horizontal divisions, you may want to write the numbers on the creases to correspond to the numbers referred to in the directions.


Facial features, like a mouth or nose, are created by pulling out a horizontal pleat that lies within the "valley" between two vertical pleats, and recreasing it so that it juts out at an angle. This maneuver may prove to be a bit tricky at first. One way to get good results is to do the following:

1. Pull the paper out until it's in the right position.

2. Make light creases so that the pulled-out section stays pulled out.

3. Gently close up the model, but not all the way.

4. Open the model to make sure the creases are in the right place and adjust accordingly.

5. Finally, close up (fan-fold) the model firmly to set the creases.


One technique that might help is to close up all the vertical pleats of the model except for the single "valley" you're working in. This gives you more control.

CHAPTER 2

Models with Jaws that Snap and Ears that Pop Out


The animal faces in this section all have pop-up snouts, and ears that protrude either from the top or the side of the head. With most of the models, you draw in the eyes when the folding is done; with some models, the eyes emerge as a result of folding—the baboon's eyes are suggested by a pleat, and the wolf's eyes appear when the model is held up to a light.

As I was designing these models, I learned through trial and error that the angle at which the snout pops out can be critical in conveying the essence of the animal. With the monkey, for example, if I sharpened or broadened the angle of the snout, or moved it the tiniest bit, the model lost some of its monkeylike traits.

That's why I tried as much as possible to use landmarks and reference points in the folding sequences—to help ensure that your results would match those in the book. If your model doesn't look like its subject, then the angle of the snout is one of the first things to check.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from ANIMATED ORIGAMI FACES by JOEL STERN. Copyright © 2007 Joel Stern. Excerpted by permission of Dover Publications, Inc..
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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