BN.com Gift Guide

Anne Frank: Her Life in Words and Pictures from the Archives of the Anne Frank House

Overview

On a summer in 1942, Anne Frank and her family went into hiding from the Nazis. Until the day they arrested her, more than two years later, she kept a diary. ANNE FRANK is the indespensable visual guide to her tragic, but inspiring story. Produced in association with The Anne Frank House and filled with never-before-published snapshots, school pictures, and photos of the diary and the Secret Annex, this elegantly designed album is both a stand-alone introduction to Anne's life and a photographic companion to a ...

See more details below
Paperback (Reprint)
$12.20
BN.com price
(Save 18%)$14.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (14) from $1.99   
  • New (11) from $8.22   
  • Used (3) from $1.99   
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

On a summer in 1942, Anne Frank and her family went into hiding from the Nazis. Until the day they arrested her, more than two years later, she kept a diary. ANNE FRANK is the indespensable visual guide to her tragic, but inspiring story. Produced in association with The Anne Frank House and filled with never-before-published snapshots, school pictures, and photos of the diary and the Secret Annex, this elegantly designed album is both a stand-alone introduction to Anne's life and a photographic companion to a classic of Holocaust literature.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“A treasure to hold and to read, created with great care and mission.” —Kirkus Reviews,

 

“…exemplary…this small and quietly compelling dutch import is filled with warm family and chilling historical photos that intimately chronicle the slide toward genocide….This thorough and thoughtful companion piece underscores Anne Frank’s importance as an unintended and enduring voice in the struggle against oppression."  — San Francisco Chronicle

 

"Readers will be enthralled by the intimate details and by the ongoing mystery of who betrayed the family, and they will want to talk about the heartbreaking quote from Otto Frank, who, after reading the Diary, realized that he never knew his daughter.”— Booklist [STARRED]

 

“A treasure to hold and to read, created with great care and mission.”

                                                                         —Kirkus Reviews [STARRED]

“Even for those collections where Anne Frank is well represented, this is a moving and valuable book that creates a memorable introduction to both Anne’s diary and her short, yet meaningful life.”

                                                                          — School Library Journal [STARRED]

 

Best Children’s Book of the Year, 2009            Kirkus Reviews

“This beautifully designed, hand-size volume published in partnership with the Anne Frank House makes an ideal gift for any age admirer of Anne Frank. Photos of the interior and exterior… make the journey through this book the next best thing to a visit to what is now preserved as the Anne Frank House.”                                                            Shelf Awareness

 

This extraordinary little book has a sky-high fascination factor. Most spectacular of all is the reproduction on nine wordless double-page spreads of actual pages from Anne’s diary…Eminently browsable, goosebump-inducingly immediate; a treasure for all those moved and inspired by Anne Frank’s story."                                                 — Horn Book Review

Elizabeth Devereaux
Under the intimacy of the authors' gaze, Anne emerges with her vulnerability and contradictions intact. She is allowed her hopes and self-proclaimed idealism, and also her terrors and, more prominently than usual, her loneliness…In short, she stays an individual.
—The New York Times
School Library Journal
Gr 5 Up—Beginning with a single photograph of the cover of Anne Frank's diary and the quote, "One of my nicest presents," this small, beautifully formatted book is accessible, compelling, and richly pictorial. First published by the Anne Frank House under the title The Story of Anne Frank, the book immediately immerses readers in the girl's life via a series of family photographs, many previously unpublished. Divided chronologically, the accompanying text is enhanced by diary entries, resulting in a historically succinct yet descriptive presentation, even for those who have yet to read her actual diary. As the narrative progresses, the photographs grow thematically darker, including many black-and-white interior shots of the Annex taken a few years after the war, as well as several generic photographs of Jewish families in the concentration camps. The center of the book provides the most immediate experience of Anne's diary, with a series of full-page color photographs that are presented without commentary or translation. The miracle of Otto Frank's survival will not be lost on children as they view the haunting photo of him standing alone in the attic of the Anne Frank House on the day of its opening to the public in 1960. Even for those collections where Anne Frank is well represented, this is a moving and valuable book that creates a memorable introduction to both Anne's diary and her short, yet meaningful life.—Teri Markson, Los Angeles Public Library
Kirkus Reviews
Her diary, a Broadway play, a movie and countless books about Anne have brought her to life for every generation after World War II. This exemplary work, which combines many previously unseen photographs, pages from the diary and abundant historical context, has been produced "from the archives of the Anne Frank House" in Amsterdam. It's a treasure to hold and to read, created with great care and mission. The care has gone into the superb arrangement and presentation of information. The mission is to remind us all of the total destructiveness of evil. Anne's short life unfolds from her childhood to the years in the Secret Annex to the brief months in a concentration camp and her death. Her father's survival, the publication of the diary and its enormous success, the establishment of the Anne Frank House and the efforts to identify the betrayer follow. Readers will pore over the pictures, so typical of a family album, read diary excerpts penned by a young girl growing into a woman and see the actual buildings and locations. She was just one of more than 1,000,000 murdered children, but her writings made her iconic. A necessary purchase. (glossary, maps) (Nonfiction. 10 & up)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781596435476
  • Publisher: Roaring Brook Press
  • Publication date: 9/1/2009
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 216
  • Sales rank: 522,664
  • Age range: 9 - 12 Years
  • Product dimensions: 6.50 (w) x 6.40 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

In 1960, the building that housed the Secret Annex where the Frank family hid was officially opened as a museum. Every year as many as one million people visit THE ANNE FRANK HOUSE.

Read More Show Less

Reading Group Guide

1. Find Frankfurt am Main, Germany, on a map, and

research information about its standard of living.

What kind of neighborhood does it appear the

Franks lived in? What city here in the United States

would you compare it to? How far is Amsterdam

from Frankfurt? How different were these cities in

the 1930s?

2. What can you determine about the Frank family

from these photos? What do you see that indicates

how they lived? What can you tell from the photographs

about the historical context of the time in

which they lived?

3. Find reports in current newspapers of religious intolerance,

racism, genocide, and threats to individuals’

civil rights. The anthropologist Margaret Mead

once said, “Never doubt that a small group of

thoughtful, committed citizens can change the

world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.” List

five ways you would change the world to rid it of

such abuse.

4. Compare the photos of the Frank family prior to

1942 with the images of their attic hiding place.

“Who would have guessed three months ago that

quicksilver Anne would have to sit so quietly for

hours on end, and what’s more that she could?”

(p. 94) Do you think you could behave so well under

similar circumstances? And why?

5. After about a year of living in hiding, Anne

writes, “We long for Saturdays because that means

books . . . Our only diversions are reading, studying

and listening to the wireless.” (p. 110) How would

you pass the time in such a situation? Imagine you

have thirty minutes to pack a bag with your most

cherished possessions. Draw pictures of the items.

6. There is a saying that “one picture is worth a

thousand words.” Which picture in this book is

worth that, in your estimation? Why?

7. Otto Frank said that he was not interested in pursuing

the person who betrayed his family. Make a

chart listing the advantages and disadvantages of

engaging in such a quest.

8. What has most shaped your understanding of

World War II: Anne’s diary, popular films such as

The Boy in the Striped Pajamas, history class, or

other books?

9. Since we have computers now, very few people

keep diaries (or even write letters!). Have you ever

read the diary of one of your ancestors? Would you

like to? Keep a journal for one week in which you relate

all your feelings as well as your activities; then

consider how you would like someone else to read it.

10. In the course of keeping a diary, Anne learns

about herself and makes astute observations about

her situation and others’, such as:

“It’s amazing how much these generous and unselfish

people do, risking their own lives to help and

save others. The best example of this is our own

helpers . . . Never have they uttered a single word

about the burden we must be, never have they

complained that we’re too much trouble.” (p. 98)

“Even though I’m only fourteen, I know what I

want, I know who’s right and who’s wrong, I

have my own opinions, ideas and principles,

and though it may sound odd coming from a

teenager, I feel I’m more of a person than a

child—I feel I’m completely independent of others.”

(p. 140)

“Can you tell me why people go to such lengths

to hide their real selves? Or why I always behave

very differently when I’m in the company of others?”

(p. 141)

“What’s the point of the war? Why, oh, why

can’t people live together peacefully? Why all

this destruction?” (p. 152)

“It’s a wonder I haven’t abandoned all my

ideals, they seem so absurd and impractical. Yet

I cling to them because I still believe, in spite of

everything, that people are truly good at heart.

It’s utterly impossible for me to build my life on

a foundation of chaos, suffering and death. I see

the world being slowly transformed into a

wilderness, I hear the approaching thunder that,

one day, will destroy us too, I feel the suffering

of millions. And yet, when I look up at the sky, I

somehow feel that everything will change for the

better, that this cruelty too will end, that peace

and tranquillity will return once more.” (p. 159)

Is there any quotation from Anne’s diary that particularly

moves you? Is there one that you feel you

could have written yourself? Consider your own

diary: Did you learn something about yourself?

Were you able to see a situation more clearly having

written about it?

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2010

    wonderful and touching

    An excellent introduction to anyone learning of the Anne Frank story. Especially good for young adults to see pictures of another young adult and what she endured and how her courage carried her through to her untimely death. For those of us familiar with the events, a touching portrait of a sad time in our history.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 22, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    A pictorial history of Anne and her family

    I clearly remember reading Anne Frank's diary for the first time: I was in fourth grade and we had just studied the Holocaust in school. My mom had a copy of the diary from when she was young, and I poured over the words of this girl from not so long ago and was mesmerized by her story. Ever since, I have been deeply interested and affected by so many people's stories from that dark period in history. I always come back to the story of Anne Frank, though, and this new book released from the arch...more I clearly remember reading Anne Frank's diary for the first time: I was in fourth grade and we had just studied the Holocaust in school. My mom had a copy of the diary from when she was young, and I poured over the words of this girl from not so long ago and was mesmerized by her story. Ever since, I have been deeply interested and affected by so many people's stories from that dark period in history. I always come back to the story of Anne Frank, though, and this new book released from the archives of the Anne Frank House is such a wonderful tribute to her diary and her life.
    The book is primarily a pictorial history of the life of Anne Frank and her family, beginning with photos of her parents' wedding in 1925. An amazingly large amount of the Frank family's family photos were somehow preserved throughout the hiding process and the subsequent discovery of their hiding place in 1944. Interspersed with the pictures are quotes from Anne's diary and various commentaries on the photos.
    This book is a great stand-alone introduction to Anne Frank and also a helpful companion to the diary and to those who are already familiar with her life. It is a powerful reminder of all the lives, all the families, that were destroyed in the Holocaust. Anne Frank put a face on the more than 1 million children who perished under Hitler's regime.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)