Anne of Green Gables: The Official Movie Adaptation

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Overview

When Matthew and Marilla Cuthbert decide to send word to an orphanage for a little boy to help around Green Gables, their lives are forever changed by an unexpected mistake—an 11-year-old girl named Anne Shirley. Through a series of lessons and adventures the imaginative, spunky redheaded orphan who longs for a real family, friends, and a place to call home soon captures the hearts of the Cuthberts and all those around her in the small town of Avonlea. The original books have delighted millions and now younger ...

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Anne of Green Gables

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Overview

When Matthew and Marilla Cuthbert decide to send word to an orphanage for a little boy to help around Green Gables, their lives are forever changed by an unexpected mistake—an 11-year-old girl named Anne Shirley. Through a series of lessons and adventures the imaginative, spunky redheaded orphan who longs for a real family, friends, and a place to call home soon captures the hearts of the Cuthberts and all those around her in the small town of Avonlea. The original books have delighted millions and now younger readers can treasure this illustrated official movie adaptation based on the classic film by Kevin Sullivan.

Anne, an eleven-year-old orphan, is sent by mistake to live with a lonely, middle-aged brother and sister on a Prince Edward Island farm and proceeds to make an indelible impression on everyone around her.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
When mischievous orphan Anne Shirley arrives at the Cuthbert farm Green Gables, she knows she wants to stay forever. But the Cuthbert's were expecting a boy orphan -- someone strong enough to help with their farmwork. Can spunky Anne win their hearts? This beautiful picture book adaptation of L. M. Montgomery's classic novel will delight the author's many fans -- and captivate a new audience of younger readers.
Publishers Weekly
This simplified picture-book retelling of how the 11-year-old orphan comes to Prince Edward Island is adapted from L.M. Montgomery's classic. Ages 5-8. (Apr.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Anne Shirley is back with her sentiment, sweetness and loquaciousness in this new edition of the all-time favorite girl's classic. L. M. Montgomery's partially autobiographical orphan's tale first saw the light of day in 1908 and was so successful that it was followed by many sequels. Yet it is the original book that is the heart of the story, a story still strong enough to bring hordes of visitors on pilgrimage each year to Prince Edward Island in search of the fictional Anne's haunts. Fernandez and Jacobson, the Canadian husband and wife team of illustrators, have done a lovely job of illustrating this edition, particularly in the ink and watercolor sketches of flowers, pitchers, buckets of apples and other comfortable everyday things strewn through the pages. The only complaint is that they didn't make Anne's original nemesis Mrs. Rachel Lynde fat! 2000, Tundra Books. Ages 10 up. Reviewer: Kathleen Karr
Children's Literature - Melissa Stickles
The lives of three people are changed forever when Matthew and Marilla Cuthbert decide they want to adopt a boy to help around the farm. Instead of a boy, they get a day-dreaming, spunky, red-headed orphan girl. She is 11-year-old Anne Shirley, and all she really wants is a family of her own. Her presence in the quiet little town of Avonlea will prove to be both rewarding and challenging as she wins her way into the hearts of many. Always looking for her Kindred Spirit, Anne finds herself in the middle of many self-made dilemmas—mostly due to her constant day-dreaming and her fiery temper! The reader will be forced to fall in love with Anne as she weaves in and out of her mistakes to become a character worth remembering. Follow Anne as she starts school for the first time, falls in love with Gilbert Blythe, unknowingly gets her best friend intoxicated, saves the life of a baby and yet loses her beloved Matthew. Beautiful still photographs from the movie illustrate realistically the emotions and the physical setting of the era and bring to life the sentimental longings of a young, coming-of-age girl. The layout of the text and the accompanying photographs take the reader to a time and place that seems happier, safer and even simpler. This captivating story is a must read and the intriguing characters and scenery will not soon be forgotten. Reviewer: Melissa Stickles
Library Journal
Montgomery is the latest author to join Running Press's ongoing "Courage Classics'' series of budget hardcover reprints of classic works. Along with the full text, this edition includes excerpts from the author's journal. Also new in the line is Short Stories and Tall Tales by Mark Twain ( ISBN 1-56138-323-6 ), which offers pieces gleaned from Running Press's The Unabridged Mark Twain . At this bargain price, both titles are excellent choices.
School Library Journal
Gr 5-8-The nostalgic charm of Avonlea comes alive in Lucy Maud Montgomery's heart-warming tale set on the quaint island of Prince William about an aging brother and sister, Mathew and Marilla Cuthbert, and their decision to adopt a young boy to help with chores around their farm. However, as the result of a misunderstanding the boy turns out to be a feisty, independent, and wildly imaginative redheaded girl named Anne. Marilla's first reaction to this news is, "What use is she to us?" Wherein Mathew replies, "We might be of some use to her." Throughout this moving story these two statements mix and meld together so richly and completely that they become one truth. Three lives are changed so dramatically that none can imagine life without the others. Each new day brings a new set of adventures, often hilarious and always uplifting. Anne's vivid and overactive imagination is the cause of many mishaps, but her saving grace is her heart of gold. Her best friend and "kindred spirit," Diana, and her handsome admirer, Gilbert Blythe, often find themselves unintentional victims of Anne's escapades. Narrator Shelly Frasier's pleasant voice is especially enjoyable during the rapid ramblings of Anne and as the soft-spoken, slow-paced Mathew. Her voice reflects the human qualities of each character, switching seamlessly between broken and despaired, curt and crisp, or dreamy and absent-minded. This perennial classic, divided into convenient three minute tracks and containing a short biography of the author, is a must have for expanding audiobook collections.-Cheryl Preisendorfer, Twinsburg High School, OH Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
From The Critics
This keepsake or gift edition provides a beautiful hardcover illustrated by Laura Fernandez and Rick Jacobson and using the complete, unabridged text used in the first 1908 edition of Anne. Any who love the story of the red-headed spunky orphan will consider this a fine keepsake edition.
From Barnes & Noble
When mischievous orphan Anne Shirley arrives at the Cuthbert farm Green Gables, she knows she wants to stay forever. One of the best-loved & most enduring books in all of children's literature, written with sweetness and charm. Ages 10 & up
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780978255251
  • Publisher: Davenport Press
  • Publication date: 10/1/2008
  • Edition description: MTI
  • Pages: 80
  • Age range: 9 - 12 Years
  • Product dimensions: 8.50 (w) x 10.90 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author

L. M. Montgomery is the author of the Anne of Green Gables series, The Blue Castle, and Mistress Pat.

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Read an Excerpt

Mrs. Rachel Lynde lived just where the Avonlea main road dipped down into a little hollow, fringed with alders and ladies' eardrops and traversed by a brook that had its source away back in the woods of the old Cuthbert place; it was reputed to be an intricate, headlong brook in its earlier course through those woods, with dark secrets of pool and cascade; but by the time it reached Lynde's Hollow it was a quiet, well-conducted little stream, for not even a brook could run past Mrs. Rachel Lynde's door without due regard for decency and decorum; it probably was conscious that Mrs. Rachel was sitting at her window, keeping a sharp eye on everything that passed, from brooks and children up, and that if she noticed anything odd or out of place she would never rest until she had ferreted out the whys and wherefores thereof.

There are plenty of people, in Avonlea and out of it, who can attend closely to their neighbors business by dint of neglecting their own; but Mrs. Rachel Lynde was one of those capable creatures who can manage their own concerns and those of other folks into the bargain. She was a notable housewife; her work was always done and well done; she "ran" the Sewing Circle, helped run the Sunday-school, and was the strongest prop of the, Church Aid Society and Foreign Missions Auxiliary. Yet with all this Mrs. Rachel found abundant time to sit for hours at her kitchen window, knitting "cotton warp" quilts--she had, knitted sixteen of them, as Avonlea housekeepers were wont to tell in awed voices-and keeping a sharp eye on the main road that crossed the hollow and wound up the steep red hill beyond. Since Avonlea occupied a little triangularpeninsula jutting out into the Gulf of St. Lawrence, with water on two sides of it, anybody who went out of it or into it had to pass over that hill road and so run the unseen gauntlet of Mrs. Rachel's all-seeing eye.

She was sitting there one afternoon in early June. The sun was coming in at the window warm and bright; the orchard on the slope below the house was in a bridal flush of pinky-white bloom, hummed over by a myriad of bees. Thomas Lynde-a meek little man whom Avonlea people called "Rachel Lynde's husband"-was sowing his late turnip seed on the hill field beyond the barn; and Matthew Cuthbert ought to have been sowing his on the big red brook field away over by Green Gables. Mrs. Rachel knew that he ought because she had heard him tell Peter Morrison the evening before in William J. Blaire's store over at Carmody that he meant to sow his turnip seed the next afternoon. Peter had asked him, of course, for Matthew Cuthbert had never been known to volunteer information about anything in his whole life.

And yet here was Matthew Cuthbert, at half-past three on the afternoon of a busy day, placidly driving over the hollow and up the hill; moreover, he wore a white collar and his best suit of clothes, which was plain proof that he was going out of Avonlea; and he had the buggy and the sorrel mare, which betokened that he was going a considerable distance. Now, where was Matthew Cuthbert going and why was he going there?

Had it been any other man in Avonlea Mrs. Rachel, deftly putting this and that together, might have given a pretty good guess as to both questions. But Matthew so rarely went from home that it must be something pressing and unusual which was taking him; he was the shyest man alive and hated to have to go among strangers or to any place where he might have to talk. Matthew, dressed up with a white collar and driving in a buggy, was something that didn't happen often. Mrs. Rachel, ponder as she might, could make nothing of it and her afternoo's enjoyment was spoiled.

"I'll just step over to Green Gables after tea and find out from Marilla where he's gone and why," the worthy woman finally concluded. "He doesn't generally go to town this time of year and he new visits; if he'd run out of turnip seed he wouldn't dress up and take the buggy to go for more; he wasn't driving fast enough to be going for the doctor. Yet something must have happened since List night to start him off. I'm clean puzzled, that's what, and I won't know a minute's peace of mind or conscience until I know what has taken Matthew Cuthbert out of Avonlea today-"

Accordingly after tea Mrs. Rachel set out; she had not far to go; the big, rambling orchard-embowered house where the Cuthberts lived was a scant quarter of a mile up the road from Lynde's Hollow. To be sure, the long lane made it a good deal further. Matthew Cuthberfs father, as shy and silent as his son after him, had got as far away as he possibly could from his fellow men without actually retreating into the woods when he founded his homestead. Green Gables was built at the furthest edge of his cleared land and there it was to this day, barely visible from the main road along which all the other Avonlea houses were so sociably situated. Mrs. Rachel Lynde did not call living in such a place living at all.

1. It's just staying, that's what," she said as she stepped along the deep-rutted, grassy lane bordered with wild rose bushes. "Ifs no wonder Matthew and Marilia are both a little odd, living away back here by themselves. Trees aren't much company, though dear knows if they were there'd be enough of them. I'd ruther look at people. To be sure, they seem contented enough; but then, I suppose, they're used to it. A body can get used to anything even to being hanged, as the Irishman said."


From the Paperback edition.

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Table of Contents

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First Chapter

Mrs. Rachel Lynde lived just where the Avonlea main road dipped down into a little hollow, fringed with alders and ladies' eardrops and traversed by a brook that had its source away back in the woods of the old Cuthbert place; it was reputed to be an intricate, headlong brook in its earlier course through those woods, with dark secrets of pool and cascade; but by the time it reached Lynde's Hollow it was a quiet, well-conducted little stream, for not even a brook could run past Mrs. Rachel Lynde's door without due regard for decency and decorum; it probably was conscious that Mrs. Rachel was sitting at her window, keeping a sharp eye on everything that passed, from brooks and children up, and that if she noticed anything odd or out of place she would never rest until she had ferreted out the whys and wherefores thereof.

There are plenty of people, in Avonlea and out of it, who can attend closely to their neighbors business by dint of neglecting their own; but Mrs. Rachel Lynde was one of those capable creatures who can manage their own concerns and those of other folks into the bargain. She was a notable housewife; her work was always done and well done; she "ran" the Sewing Circle, helped run the Sunday-school, and was the strongest prop of the, Church Aid Society and Foreign Missions Auxiliary. Yet with all this Mrs. Rachel found abundant time to sit for hours at her kitchen window, knitting "cotton warp" quilts--she had, knitted sixteen of them, as Avonlea housekeepers were wont to tell in awed voices-and keeping a sharp eye on the main road that crossed the hollow and wound up the steep red hill beyond. Since Avonlea occupied a little triangular peninsula jutting out intothe Gulf of St. Lawrence, with water on two sides of it, anybody who went out of it or into it had to pass over that hill road and so run the unseen gauntlet of Mrs. Rachel's all-seeing eye.

She was sitting there one afternoon in early June. The sun was coming in at the window warm and bright; the orchard on the slope below the house was in a bridal flush of pinky-white bloom, hummed over by a myriad of bees. Thomas Lynde-a meek little man whom Avonlea people called "Rachel Lynde's husband"-was sowing his late turnip seed on the hill field beyond the barn; and Matthew Cuthbert ought to have been sowing his on the big red brook field away over by Green Gables. Mrs. Rachel knew that he ought because she had heard him tell Peter Morrison the evening before in William J. Blaire's store over at Carmody that he meant to sow his turnip seed the next afternoon. Peter had asked him, of course, for Matthew Cuthbert had never been known to volunteer information about anything in his whole life.

And yet here was Matthew Cuthbert, at half-past three on the afternoon of a busy day, placidly driving over the hollow and up the hill; moreover, he wore a white collar and his best suit of clothes, which was plain proof that he was going out of Avonlea; and he had the buggy and the sorrel mare, which betokened that he was going a considerable distance. Now, where was Matthew Cuthbert going and why was he going there?

Had it been any other man in Avonlea Mrs. Rachel, deftly putting this and that together, might have given a pretty good guess as to both questions. But Matthew so rarely went from home that it must be something pressing and unusual which was taking him; he was the shyest man alive and hated to have to go among strangers or to any place where he might have to talk. Matthew, dressed up with a white collar and driving in a buggy, was something that didn't happen often. Mrs. Rachel, ponder as she might, could make nothing of it and her afternoo's enjoyment was spoiled.

"I'll just step over to Green Gables after tea and find out from Marilla where he's gone and why," the worthy woman finally concluded. "He doesn't generally go to town this time of year and he new visits; if he'd run out of turnip seed he wouldn't dress up and take the buggy to go for more; he wasn't driving fast enough to be going for the doctor. Yet something must have happened since List night to start him off. I'm clean puzzled, that's what, and I won't know a minute's peace of mind or conscience until I know what has taken Matthew Cuthbert out of Avonlea today-"

Accordingly after tea Mrs. Rachel set out; she had not far to go; the big, rambling orchard-embowered house where the Cuthberts lived was a scant quarter of a mile up the road from Lynde's Hollow. To be sure, the long lane made it a good deal further. Matthew Cuthberfs father, as shy and silent as his son after him, had got as far away as he possibly could from his fellow men without actually retreating into the woods when he founded his homestead. Green Gables was built at the furthest edge of his cleared land and there it was to this day, barely visible from the main road along which all the other Avonlea houses were so sociably situated. Mrs. Rachel Lynde did not call living in such a place living at all.

1. It's just staying, that's what," she said as she stepped along the deep-rutted, grassy lane bordered with wild rose bushes. "Ifs no wonder Matthew and Marilia are both a little odd, living away back here by themselves. Trees aren't much company, though dear knows if they were there'd be enough of them. I'd ruther look at people. To be sure, they seem contented enough; but then, I suppose, they're used to it. A body can get used to anything even to being hanged, as the Irishman said."
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Reading Group Guide

1.  The critic Julian Moynahan argues that “Lady Chatterley’s Lover dramatizes two opposed orientations toward life, two distinct modes of human awareness, the one abstract, cerebral, and unvital; the other concrete, physical, and organic.” Discuss.

2.  What is the role of the manor house, the industrial village, and the wood in the novel?

3.  Many critics have argued that while Lady Chatterley’s Lover represents a daring treatment of sexuality, it is an inferior work of art, though other critics have called it a novel of the first rank. (“Lady Chatterley’s Lover, ” F. R. Leavis writes, “is a bad novel, ” while Anaïs Nin, on the other hand, describes it as “artistically . . . [Lawrence’s] best novel.”) What do you think?

4.  In “Apropos of Lady Chatterley’s Lover” (a defense of the book that he published in 1930), Lawrence wrote that “the greatest need of man is the renewal forever of the complete rhythm of life and death, the rhythm of the sun’s year, the body’s year of a lifetime, and the greater year of the stars, the soul’s year of immortality.” How is the theme of resurrection played out in the novel?

5.  From the time it was banned from unexpurgated publication in the United States and Britain until the trials in the late 1950s and early 1960s that resulted in the lifting of the ban, and even more recently, critics have argued over whether Lady Chatterley’s Lover is obscene and vulgar. Lawrence argues in “Apropos of Lady Chatterley’s Lover”that “we shall never free the phallic reality [i. e., sex] . . . till we give it its own phallic language and use the obscene words”; his goal was to purify these words. Critics have disagreed as to whether he succeeded in this goal; Richard Aldington notes, for example, that the words are “incrusted with nastiness” and “cannot regain their purity” and Graham Hough argues that “the fact remains that the connotations of the obscene physical words are either facetious or vulgar.” Do you think the novel is obscene or vulgar, or do you think Lawrence succeeds in his mission?

6.  “The essential function of art is moral, ” Lawrence once wrote. “Not aesthetic, not decorative, not pastime and recreation. But moral.” Do you think this proposition informs the shape, structure, and meaning of Lady Chatterley’s Lover, and if so, how?

7.  Critics have often complained that one of Lawrence’s weaknesses as a novelist is his characterization. So John Middleton Murry writes of Sons and Lovers that “we can discern no individuality whatever in the denizens of Mr. Lawrence’s world. We should have thought that we should have been able to distinguish between male and female at least. But no! Remove the names, remove the sedulous catalogues of unnecessary clothing . . . and man and woman are as indistinguishable as octopods in an aquarium tank.” And Edwin Muir comments generally that “we remember the scenes in his novels; we forget the names of his men and women. We should not know any of them if we met them in the street.” Do you think this applies in the case of Lady Chatterley’s Lover? If so, do you think it is a fault or a virtue?

8.  How does nature imagery function in the novel?

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 599 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(383)

4 Star

(85)

3 Star

(50)

2 Star

(23)

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(58)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 602 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 19, 2011

    tons of typos

    Holy cow, there were some ridiculous typos in this e-book. "Marilla" was referred to as "Manila" half the time. I recommend finding a better version.

    24 out of 33 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 14, 2011

    Superb classic but many errors in getting to electronic format

    I read this as a child so I was excited to be able to download it for free. But due to all of the errors in translating to electronic format I was nit able to really enjoy it. I spent more time trying to figure out what words were supposed to be there than just relaxing and enjoying the story. I will have to get a hard copy from my library. Too bad the electronic copy was not reviwed prior to publishing as many people will probably get frustrated before the story is done and move on to something else. Regardless of the errors I love this story and look forward to getting it from my local library as i suggest anyone interested in reading this story to do.

    17 out of 22 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 15, 2011

    Some improvement nessacary

    This book is one of my favorites and truly wonderful for the price, but there are a couple of typos and spacing issues that need to be resolved. Must buy for the price.

    11 out of 15 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 11, 2012

    Wonderful book!

    I had never read this book before but I'm sooo happy I finally did. I enjoyed it immensely! It would be "tragical" if you don't make time for this classic.

    10 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 27, 2011

    AMAZING

    this book is amazing for the price. very few typos very clearly written. soooooooooooooooooooooo cool!!!!!

    10 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 19, 2012

    Ok, don't listen to the other negative comments

    This book is amazing... the whole series is. I recomend this to anyone. You will want to read this so many times. However , i sugedt you read the first one to understand this one.

    9 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 10, 2012

    Poor publishing!

    So many typos! The title of the book as well as the titles of chapters appear in the middle of pages. My free Kindle copy was much better!

    6 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 22, 2011

    Wonderful

    The best, most entertaining book i have ever read! It deserves ten stars!

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 7, 2011

    very good quality

    few typos. easy to read. good book.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2012

    Text is a mess

    Whoever typed this did a horrid job. About 35 pages in the text is so misconstrued that is not understandable. No wonder its free

    3 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 27, 2012

    Good Book!

    I LOVE Anne of Green Gables, I just wish there weren't so many typos. Luckily my mum read it to me a coupla years ago so I can decipher most of it but if you're a first-time reader for this book I wouldn't recommend it.

    3 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 3, 2010

    Love this book!

    I am ashamed to say that at the age of 38, this is the first time I have read this book. I regret that I missed all of these years not knowing who Anne (with an e!) was. Cannot wait to dive into the rest of the series.

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 18, 2013

    Anne if Green Gables

    This is SUCH a good book. Whoever reads it won't be able to not fall in love with Anne. Her spunk, intelligence, determination, and above all, her imagination make Anne a believable and relatable character. For those who think this is just a boring, sappy, and dull book, think again! This book series has a little something for everyone: action, romance, history, and parts that will make you chuckle. If this book seems boring to you, don't stop at the beginning. Trust me, it gets better when you find out about Anne's temper. (At school, she smashes a chalkboard over a boy's head, breaking it in half!) If this book still seems dull to you, that probably means it is above your reading level. This book uses some complicated and old-fashioned words. I tried reading this a couple of years ago, and couldn't understand a word! Don't be afraid to try it again later if it's too challenging for you. Trust me, if you don't understand it, you'll never be near to getting full satisfaction from this book. I would recommend this book for ages 13+ to get full satisfaction. I read it when I was 11, but I was in a program reading more than a year above my grade level. This book is good for reading to young children, to help encourage them to like books and have a good imagination. Please don't get a shortened version of this, it will never amount to the real one. I got a shortened version for my little sister so she could read it without trouble of big words, but the shortened version cut out all the key parts! If you want to develop skills of visualizing scenes, this book is great for you. The author is an absolute master at description. This is a story like the Romona Quimby books where the author knows how being a kid is like. This is a must read, good for everyone, but especially good for teen and preteen girls. Please read and don't give up because of a dull beginning. If you read this, I know for a fact you'll treasure it

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 18, 2013

    Great book

    The book is a classic and lovely. By accident I deleted this from my nook library. I had to re buy the book! I also have a kindle. When I buy a book it is mine FOREVER! Not happy with how BN runs the nook.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 25, 2010

    Want an awesome book? This is it.

    I've read this three times and i don't get tired of it. If I had to state a problem, it would be that the words are too big for my reading level. Eh, i'll get there.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 17, 2014

    Tap on this review!

    Anne is a bright poetice talkative girl who will touch your heart! Its a good read and be sure to read the nexr two books: Anne of Avonlea and Anne's House of Dreams. Be sure though to spell her name A-N-N-E not A-N-N.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 1, 2013

    Mk Jan.2th

    I Love Anne! This book is my favorite book of all time.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 30, 2012

    Great book

    I think this book was great and all ages gurantee a timeless classic other books i think are similar are black beauty old yeller where the red fern grows and the little house on the prarie series great book also how to ident

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2012

    LUV IT!!!!!!

    Awesome book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 11, 2012

    LOVE IT!!!!! Best book ever

    I love this biok soooooo much- i have the book version not the nook. Its so heartwarming and family-friendly and sweet, one of those books you will never get tired of reading again and again. My fav book in the universe.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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