Anne of Green Gables

Anne of Green Gables

4.2 560
by L. M. Montgomery
     
 

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Mrs. Rachel Lynde lived just where the Avonlea main road dipped down into a little hollow, fringed with alders and ladies' eardrops and traversed by a brook that had its source away back in the woods of the old Cuthbert place; it was reputed to be an intricate, headlong brook in its earlier course through those woods, with dark secrets of pool and cascade; but by the

Overview

Mrs. Rachel Lynde lived just where the Avonlea main road dipped down into a little hollow, fringed with alders and ladies' eardrops and traversed by a brook that had its source away back in the woods of the old Cuthbert place; it was reputed to be an intricate, headlong brook in its earlier course through those woods, with dark secrets of pool and cascade; but by the time it reached Lynde's Hollow it was a quiet, well-conducted little stream, for not even a brook could run past Mrs

Editorial Reviews

bn.com
In The Life of Thomas More, acclaimed author Peter Ackroyd tackles the familiar story of the man for all seasons and manages to shed new light on a life that has been the focus of scholars and historians for more than four centuries.
barnesandnoble.com
When mischievous orphan Anne Shirley arrives at the Cuthbert farm Green Gables, she knows she wants to stay forever. But the Cuthbert's were expecting a boy orphan -- someone strong enough to help with their farmwork. Can spunky Anne win their hearts? This beautiful picture book adaptation of L. M. Montgomery's classic novel will delight the author's many fans -- and captivate a new audience of younger readers.
Andrew Sullivan
This is the first biography of More to have absorbed the small revolution in Reformation scholarship of the last 20 years...and is able to see England, through the mists of Protestant and Whig propaganda, as one of the most authentically Cahtolic countries in the history of Europe. -- The New York Times Book Review
Publishers Weekly
This simplified picture-book retelling of how the 11-year-old orphan comes to Prince Edward Island is adapted from L.M. Montgomery's classic. Ages 5-8. (Apr.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Anne Shirley is back with her sentiment, sweetness and loquaciousness in this new edition of the all-time favorite girl's classic. L. M. Montgomery's partially autobiographical orphan's tale first saw the light of day in 1908 and was so successful that it was followed by many sequels. Yet it is the original book that is the heart of the story, a story still strong enough to bring hordes of visitors on pilgrimage each year to Prince Edward Island in search of the fictional Anne's haunts. Fernandez and Jacobson, the Canadian husband and wife team of illustrators, have done a lovely job of illustrating this edition, particularly in the ink and watercolor sketches of flowers, pitchers, buckets of apples and other comfortable everyday things strewn through the pages. The only complaint is that they didn't make Anne's original nemesis Mrs. Rachel Lynde fat! 2000, Tundra Books. Ages 10 up. Reviewer: Kathleen Karr
Library Journal
Montgomery is the latest author to join Running Press's ongoing "Courage Classics'' series of budget hardcover reprints of classic works. Along with the full text, this edition includes excerpts from the author's journal. Also new in the line is Short Stories and Tall Tales by Mark Twain ( ISBN 1-56138-323-6 ), which offers pieces gleaned from Running Press's The Unabridged Mark Twain . At this bargain price, both titles are excellent choices.
School Library Journal
Gr 5-8-The nostalgic charm of Avonlea comes alive in Lucy Maud Montgomery's heart-warming tale set on the quaint island of Prince William about an aging brother and sister, Mathew and Marilla Cuthbert, and their decision to adopt a young boy to help with chores around their farm. However, as the result of a misunderstanding the boy turns out to be a feisty, independent, and wildly imaginative redheaded girl named Anne. Marilla's first reaction to this news is, "What use is she to us?" Wherein Mathew replies, "We might be of some use to her." Throughout this moving story these two statements mix and meld together so richly and completely that they become one truth. Three lives are changed so dramatically that none can imagine life without the others. Each new day brings a new set of adventures, often hilarious and always uplifting. Anne's vivid and overactive imagination is the cause of many mishaps, but her saving grace is her heart of gold. Her best friend and "kindred spirit," Diana, and her handsome admirer, Gilbert Blythe, often find themselves unintentional victims of Anne's escapades. Narrator Shelly Frasier's pleasant voice is especially enjoyable during the rapid ramblings of Anne and as the soft-spoken, slow-paced Mathew. Her voice reflects the human qualities of each character, switching seamlessly between broken and despaired, curt and crisp, or dreamy and absent-minded. This perennial classic, divided into convenient three minute tracks and containing a short biography of the author, is a must have for expanding audiobook collections.-Cheryl Preisendorfer, Twinsburg High School, OH Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
This keepsake or gift edition provides a beautiful hardcover illustrated by Laura Fernandez and Rick Jacobson and using the complete, unabridged text used in the first 1908 edition of Anne. Any who love the story of the red-headed spunky orphan will consider this a fine keepsake edition.
The New Yorker
This superb biography does more than narrate the life of the Lord Chancellor who was beheaded and later canonized for refusing to accept Henry VIII as head of the church. It describes the London More knew, the ferment of humanism to which he contributed, and the contemporary appeal of Catholicism. It also portrays an archetypal zealot: More denied heretics their rights of conscience, but later pleaded his own conscience without ever glimpsing the parallel between himself and the Protestants he had executed.
Time Magazine
Brilliantly conceived.
The Wall Street Journal
Sensitive [and] well-informed.
The Boston Globe
Wonderfully vivid.
Time
Brilliantly conceived....Ackroyd's vividly human More is...imperfect yet inspiring.
Kirkus Reviews
A vividly evocative portrait of the lawyer and statesman who was 'the King's good servant, but God's first,' from award- winning biographer and novelist Ackroyd (Blake, 1996; T.S. Eliot, 1984). Thomas More was born in 1479 in Milk Street, in what is now the center of London's financial district, to Agnes and John More, a tradesman-turned-lawyer. Thomas would be one of the great intellects of his time, and Ackroyd gives particular attention to young More's rare and prolonged education: his apprenticeship at the court of the learned Archbishop and Chancellor John Morton of Canterbury, his grounding in the liberal arts at Oxford University, and his legal education at New Inn and Lincoln's Inn. More's upbringing and education, Ackroyd shows, left their permanent imprint upon him: His extensive training in dialectical logic served him well at the bar and on the bench, his time with Archbishop Morton made him familiar with the world of prelates and statecraft, and his Latin and literary training fitted him for his career as a humanist. Ackroyd vibrantly evokes the devout London in which More lived, where even successful lawyers meditated on life's transience and participated in endless rounds of prayer and ritual. He also gives an intimate picture of More's affectionate relations with his family and tells the familiar story of More's rise to favor in the court of Henry VIII, his friendship with Erasmus, his tenure as lord chancellor, and his fall from grace as the crisis of the king's divorce of Catherine of Aragon worsened. Ultimately, More's constancy to his church outweighed his obeisance to the king: Ackroyd gives what amounts to a transcript of the trial in whichMore refused to endorse Henry's marriage to Anne Boleyn, and narrates his imprisonment in the Tower of London and execution in 1535. A limpidly written and superbly wrought portrait of a complex hero who was truly, as his friend Erasmus stated, 'omnium horarum homo,' a 'man for all seasons.'

EBOOK COMMENTARY
In The Life of Thomas More, acclaimed author Peter Ackroyd tackles the familiar story of the man for all seasons and manages to shed new light on a life that has been the focus of scholars and historians for more than four centuries.
From the Publisher
"Aficionados of the auburn-tressed waif will find Anne of Green Gables lavishly illustrated."
Smithsonian Magazine
Children's Literature - Barbara L. Talcroft
First published in 1908 by Page of Boston, Anne of Green Gables became an instant bestseller. Montgomery had written poems and stories since she was a girl, but this title was her first novel. All of a sudden Montgomery and her maritime home of Prince Edward Island were famous. First read in Canada and the United States, the book was soon published in England and then in Australia and New Zealand. Though seen by some as a story for children, especially young girls, Anne captured the hearts of boys and men as well. Written in 1907, Anne is set in a slightly earlier time, evoking Montgomery’s own childhood—Anne’s fascination with “puffed-sleeve” dresses as the height of fashion places the story in the 1890s (being placed by some into the historical fiction genre). Young Anne’s highly romantic vocabulary and her outlandish but truly funny misadventures make this exuberant and outspoken heroine accessible to readers of all ages, despite (or perhaps because of) its firm presentation of the manners, morals, and prejudices of a rural Edwardian, Presbyterian island. Anne has remained continuously in print, its worldwide popularity enhanced by television serials, conferences on Prince Edward Island, and extensive literary scholarship. Aladdin’s new, unabridged edition is packaged in an attractive jacket of soft green with lacy white cutouts suggesting Green Gables’ flowers and wildlife, while including a teapot, hearts, and a silhouette of pigtailed Anne. Typeset in a clear, easy-to-read Adobe Garamond Pro, its pages should be inviting to readers who wish to investigate this Canadian classic. Reviewer: Barbara L. Talcroft; Ages 10 up.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781554459261
Publisher:
eBooksLib
Publication date:
04/21/2010
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
437 KB

Read an Excerpt

This Dark World

The infant was taken, within a week of its birth, to the precincts of the church; the child of wrath must be reformed into the image of God, 'the servant of the fiend' made into 'a son of joy'. At the church-door the priest asked the midwife if the child were male or female, and then made a sign of the cross on the infant's forehead, breast and right hand. He placed some salt in the baby's mouth according to custom; then the priest exorcised the devil from its body with a number of prayers, and pronounced baptism as the sole means 'to obtain eternal grace by spiritual regeneration'. The priest spat in his left hand and touched the ears and nose of the child with his saliva. Let the nose be open to the odour of sweetness. It was time to enter the church itself, the priest taking the right hand of the new-born child who had with the salt and saliva been granted the station of a catechumen.

The litanies of the saints were pronounced over the baptismal font; the priest then divided the water with his right hand and cast it in the four directions of the cross. He breathed three rimes upon it and then spilled wax in a cruciform pattern. He divided the holy water with a candle, before returning the taper to the cleric beside him. Oil and chrism were added, with a long rod or spoon, and the child could now be baptised. Thomas More, what seekest thou? The sponsors replied for the infant, Baptism. Dost thou wish to be baptised? I wish. The child was given to the priest, who immersed him three times in the water. He was then anointed with chrism and wrapped in a chrismal robe. Thomas More, receive a white robe, holy and unstained, which thou must bring beforethe tribunal of Our Lord Jesus Christ, that thou mayest have eternal life and live for ever and ever. The candle was lit and placed in the child's right hand, thus inaugurating a journey through this dark world which ended when, during the last rites, a candle was placed in the right hand of the dying man with the prayer, 'The Lord is my Light and my Salvation, whom shall I fear?' Whom shall this particular child fear, when it was believed by the Church that the whole truth and meaning of baptism was achieved in the act of martyrdom? 'Baptism and suffering for the sake of Christ', according to a second-century bishop, are the two acts which bring full 'remission of sins'.

It was considered best to baptise the child on the same day as its birth, if such haste were practicable, since an infant unbaptised would be consigned to limbo after its death. To leave this world in a state of original sin was to take a course to that eternal dwelling, Limbus puerorum, suspended between heaven, hell and purgatory. There the little unbaptised souls would dwell in happy ignorance beside the more formidable and haunting Limbus patrum, which contained the souls of Noah, Moses and Isaiah together with (in Dante's epic) Virgil, Aristotle, Socrates and all the good men who lived on earth before the birth, death and resurrection of Jesus. Adam had already been dragged from this place at the time of Christ's crucifixion, but there was continual debate within the Church about the consequences of denying new-born children the eternal comfort of paradise. Could a child be saved by the desire, the votum, of its parents? Thomas More himself would eventually concede only that 'those infantes be dampned onely to the payne of losse of heauen'.

In various late medieval pictures of baptism, in manuscripts and devotional manuals, the priest stands with his surplice and stole beside the font. Sometimes he seems to be balancing the infant in the palm of his hand, yet the child is so unnaturally large and alert for such an early stage in its life that we can only assume it acquired mental consciousness with its spiritual renovation. A clerk with a surplice stands behind the priest, while two sponsors and the child's father are generally seen beside the font. In some depictions of this first of the seven sacraments, an image of the dying Christ hangs behind the human scene. But the mother was rarely, if ever, present.

In the more pious households, she would have worn a girdle made out of manuscript prayer rolls in the last stages of her pregnancy, and it was customary in labour to invoke the name of St Margaret as well as the Blessed Virgin. She remained secluded after giving birth, and two or three weeks later was led out to be 'churched' or purified. When she was taken to the church, her head was covered by a handkerchief, as a veil, and she was advised not to look up at the sun or the sky. She knelt in the church while the priest blessed her and assured her, in the words of Psalm 121, that 'the sun shall not burn her by day, nor the moon by night. It was a ceremony both to celebrate the birth of the child and to give thanks for the survival of the mother. This is the late fifteenth-century world into which Thomas More was baptised.

What People are saying about this

Alfred Breit
Lawrence was concerned with one end: to reveal how love, how a relationship between a man and a woman can be most touching and beautiful, but only if it is unihibited and total.
Mark Twain
The dearest and most lovable child in fiction.

Meet the Author

Lucy Maud Montgomery (November 30, 1874–April 24, 1942) publicly known as L.M. Montgomery, was a Canadian author best known for a series of novels beginning with Anne of Green Gables, published in 1908. Anne of Green Gables was an immediate success. The central character, Anne, an orphaned girl, made Montgomery famous in her lifetime and gave her an international following. The first novel was followed by a series of sequels. Montgomery went on to publish twenty novels as well as 500 short stories and poems. Because many of the novels were set on Prince Edward Island, Canada and the Canadian province became literary landmarks. She was awarded Officer of the Order of the British Empire in 1935.

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Anne of Green Gables (Barnes & Noble Leatherbound Classics) 4.2 out of 5 based on 1 ratings. 560 reviews.
Amy Barlow More than 1 year ago
I read this as a child so I was excited to be able to download it for free. But due to all of the errors in translating to electronic format I was nit able to really enjoy it. I spent more time trying to figure out what words were supposed to be there than just relaxing and enjoying the story. I will have to get a hard copy from my library. Too bad the electronic copy was not reviwed prior to publishing as many people will probably get frustrated before the story is done and move on to something else. Regardless of the errors I love this story and look forward to getting it from my local library as i suggest anyone interested in reading this story to do.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Holy cow, there were some ridiculous typos in this e-book. "Marilla" was referred to as "Manila" half the time. I recommend finding a better version.
Brittany Fleur More than 1 year ago
This book is one of my favorites and truly wonderful for the price, but there are a couple of typos and spacing issues that need to be resolved. Must buy for the price.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is amazing... the whole series is. I recomend this to anyone. You will want to read this so many times. However , i sugedt you read the first one to understand this one.
Isabella Parker More than 1 year ago
this book is amazing for the price. very few typos very clearly written. soooooooooooooooooooooo cool!!!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I had never read this book before but I'm sooo happy I finally did. I enjoyed it immensely! It would be "tragical" if you don't make time for this classic.
Megan Hope Martinez More than 1 year ago
The best, most entertaining book i have ever read! It deserves ten stars!
Lindell Huskey More than 1 year ago
few typos. easy to read. good book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is SUCH a good book. Whoever reads it won't be able to not fall in love with Anne. Her spunk, intelligence, determination, and above all, her imagination make Anne a believable and relatable character. For those who think this is just a boring, sappy, and dull book, think again! This book series has a little something for everyone: action, romance, history, and parts that will make you chuckle. If this book seems boring to you, don't stop at the beginning. Trust me, it gets better when you find out about Anne's temper. (At school, she smashes a chalkboard over a boy's head, breaking it in half!) If this book still seems dull to you, that probably means it is above your reading level. This book uses some complicated and old-fashioned words. I tried reading this a couple of years ago, and couldn't understand a word! Don't be afraid to try it again later if it's too challenging for you. Trust me, if you don't understand it, you'll never be near to getting full satisfaction from this book. I would recommend this book for ages 13+ to get full satisfaction. I read it when I was 11, but I was in a program reading more than a year above my grade level. This book is good for reading to young children, to help encourage them to like books and have a good imagination. Please don't get a shortened version of this, it will never amount to the real one. I got a shortened version for my little sister so she could read it without trouble of big words, but the shortened version cut out all the key parts! If you want to develop skills of visualizing scenes, this book is great for you. The author is an absolute master at description. This is a story like the Romona Quimby books where the author knows how being a kid is like. This is a must read, good for everyone, but especially good for teen and preteen girls. Please read and don't give up because of a dull beginning. If you read this, I know for a fact you'll treasure it
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Quite enjoyed this book even at my old age of 83. I hope others will like it as well.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anne is a bright poetice talkative girl who will touch your heart! Its a good read and be sure to read the nexr two books: Anne of Avonlea and Anne's House of Dreams. Be sure though to spell her name A-N-N-E not A-N-N.
KinLove More than 1 year ago
The book is a classic and lovely. By accident I deleted this from my nook library. I had to re buy the book! I also have a kindle. When I buy a book it is mine FOREVER! Not happy with how BN runs the nook.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I Love Anne! This book is my favorite book of all time.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I think this book was great and all ages gurantee a timeless classic other books i think are similar are black beauty old yeller where the red fern grows and the little house on the prarie series great book also how to ident
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Whoever typed this did a horrid job. About 35 pages in the text is so misconstrued that is not understandable. No wonder its free
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Awesome book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love this biok soooooo much- i have the book version not the nook. Its so heartwarming and family-friendly and sweet, one of those books you will never get tired of reading again and again. My fav book in the universe.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
So many typos! The title of the book as well as the titles of chapters appear in the middle of pages. My free Kindle copy was much better!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Searching to stock my nook with some of my favorites, in this case Anne of Green Gables, I decided I might as well try the free version first, aware that these older, free nook books often have some mixed up letters and other errors. However, this one is particularly bad. The first chapter is a complete jumble of text, with everything completely out of order, making it, sadly, unreadable. At least it was free, so I didn't waste money, but I did waste some time. I'll just have to pay for a copy and hope it's not too expensive.
Adriana Marra More than 1 year ago
I've read this three times and i don't get tired of it. If I had to state a problem, it would be that the words are too big for my reading level. Eh, i'll get there.
RetroLvr More than 1 year ago
I am ashamed to say that at the age of 38, this is the first time I have read this book. I regret that I missed all of these years not knowing who Anne (with an e!) was. Cannot wait to dive into the rest of the series.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I first read this book when I was six...it is still one of my all time favorites. My other seven are: Anne of Avonlea Anne of the Island Anne of Windy Poplars Anne's house of dreams Anne of ingleside Rainbow vally Rilla of ingleside
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Must read now!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
224perweek More than 1 year ago
When searching for the right word to describe this book I would have to say quaint,......cute,......entertaining. While there was no action or drama in it, it was a fun story. I loved Anne and the other characters.