Annie and Simon
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Annie and Simon

by Catharine O'Neill
     
 

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A chatty little girl and her patient older brother share an easy bond in a charming early chapter book filled with warmth and wry humor.

Annie and Simon: little sister and big, big brother. Annie likes to talk — a lot — about what she’s going to be when she grows up, about the clouds and rain and umbrellas, about picnics in the park and

Overview

A chatty little girl and her patient older brother share an easy bond in a charming early chapter book filled with warmth and wry humor.

Annie and Simon: little sister and big, big brother. Annie likes to talk — a lot — about what she’s going to be when she grows up, about the clouds and rain and umbrellas, about picnics in the park and meteors, about loons and canoes and turtles. And Simon is a very good listener. He knows a lot about the stars and the weather, how to fix bee stings, and where to look for loons. He knows a lot about being the kind of big brother that keeps a little sister smiling. Whether they are poking around the garden or paddling through a marsh, curious Annie and patient Simon are siblings who are clearly happy in each other’s company.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Annie tickled Simon’s foot with her green comb.
"Yoo-hoo, big brother! Guess what I’ve been doing?"
Simon looked up. "What, Annie?"
"Fixing Hazel’s hair," said Annie. "When I grow up, I’m going to be a hairdresser."
Simon looked at Hazel. Then he turned a page.
"There’s an idea," he said.
Annie combed the hair on top of Simon’s head straight up. She combed the sides straight out. She patted the back down flat. Annie looked at Simon’s head.
"Can I fix your hair, Simon?"
"My hair?" said Simon.
"Hazel hardly has any," said Annie.
Simon stopped reading and sat up. "My hair doesn’t need fixing, Annie."
"It does, too, Simon. Hold still."
Annie laid out the cards. "My turn," she said.
Annie picked up two cards and put them back.
Hazel jumped up and licked Simon’s hairdo. "Hazel, lie down," said Simon. Hazel didn’t.
Simon picked up two cards and two cards and two cards.
"She’ll listen to me, Simon. Hazel, LIE DOWN!"
said Annie.
But Hazel didn’t.
"There," she said. "Now you look pretty."
Annie held up a mirror and showed Simon his new hairdo.
"Holy cow!" said Simon.
"Now let’s play cards," said Annie.
Soon Annie’s hair was all done. And it wouldn’t come undone.
"Eeeeeek!" said Annie.
Hazel leaped and barked at Annie’s hairdo.
"HAZEL, LIE DOWN!" said Annie.
But Hazel didn’t.
"Hey, I won!" said Simon.
"Let’s not play cards," said Annie.
"You know, Annie," said Simon, "if you’re going to be a hairdresser, aybe you should give yourself a new hairdo."
Simon went back to reading his book.
Annie picked up the comb. She combed her hair up and down and all around.
"Hey, this is fun," she said.
"Lord love a duck," said Simon. "It really is stuck."
Simon twisted Annie’s comb a little this way and a little that.
"Ouch!" said Annie. "Maybe I won’t be a hairdresser, Simon. I could be . . . a baker."
"Huh," said Simon. "There’s an idea."
"Can I have a cookie, Simon?"
"What’s up?" asked Simon. He came over to have a look. "Annie, what have you done?"
Annie pulled her sweater over her head. "I wound up my hair and it’s all stuck."
"Let me see," said Simon.
Annie took the sweater off her head.
"There," said Simon. "Now you have your old hairdo back."
Annie held up the mirror to see.
Then she tapped Simon’s head. "Simon, Simon, look! Hazel’s lying down!"
"At last," said Simon. "Here, Annie. Have another cookie."
Simon found a pair of scissors.
"Hold still, Annie. I’ll cut the comb to bits."
"Aaaaaagh!" said Annie.
One by one, Simon snipped off each tooth of Annie’s comb. He wiggled the comb a little this way and a little that. Then he pulled the comb from Annie’s hair.
Annie and Simon munched on their cookies.
"You know what, Simon?"
"What?"
Annie scratched Hazel’s tummy. "When I grow up, I’m going to be a dog trainer."
Simon took a bite of his cookie. "There’s an idea," he said.

***************
ANNIE AND SIMON by Catharine O'Neill. Copyright (c) 2008 by Catharine O'Neill. Published by Candlewick Press, Inc., Cambridge, MA.

Children's Literature - Marilyn Courtot
Simon is quite a few years older than his little sister Annie, but he seems to enjoy being a big brother. When Annie decides to play hairdresser, she makes Simon's hair stand out straight from his head, but her longer hair gets all tangled in the comb. Not to worry, it is Simon to the rescue. Every time Annie suggests a new career for herself, Simon, in his nonplus manner, says "There's an idea." In another chapter, Simon and Annie head out on the lake in a canoe to look for a loon. Simon spots turtles, water lilies, a muskrat, a heron, and much more. After Annie tips the canoe and they both end up in the lake (they both have on lifejackets), Annie and Simon head for shore. Then, Annie finally gets to see what they set out for. In the last story, Annie is making a special drink, but Simon is not interested in trying it. He does notice in the newspaper that there is a meteor shower that night. The two have a slight disagreement while getting ready to watch the meteor shower, and Annie puts her head in her knapsack. She misses the meteor shower, but luckily, there is another one, and then the two makeup. It is a really sweet series of stories featuring a very patient and loving older brother enjoying time with his very young sister. Reviewer: Marilyn Courtot
School Library Journal

K-Gr 2- Annie is an active, excitable young attention seeker. Simon is her unflappable teenage brother who sets aside his books and guitar to share adventures with her. He's patient to a fault, untangling her messes and gently humoring her endless chatter and questions. There's never any doubt that he loves his little sister, and the watercolor illustrations support his feelings. The two are seen snuggling on a towel after Annie causes their canoe to tip over, and he carries her home after they watch shooting stars in the park, her head on his shoulder. Annie's frenetic pace is right on for a young child, but the something special here is Simon. How many big brothers would make it rain with a garden hose so a little sister could use her umbrella? With four short chapters and colorful illustrations on every page, this book should appeal to fairly competent beginning readers.-Kelly Roth, Bartow County Public Library, Cartersville, GA

Kirkus Reviews
Talkative, inquisitive preschooler Annie and her much-older brother Simon are a good team. Annie wants to be a hairdresser, and Simon has hair in need of dressing. Annie wants to see a loon, and Simon can pilot a canoe. Annie desperately wants a rain shower, and Simon figures out how to give her one. Even after a disagreement over Annie's "special drink" concoction, the two remain best friends as well as siblings. O'Neill based the characters on her own daughter and stepsons, and the basis in fact shines through; Annie and Simon's four stories collected here will ring true for most newly independent readers. The watercolor illustrations of the two and their bark-full dog Hazel are full of humor and detail. Each story also has a touch of nature information. O'Neill's first solo effort in some years is well worth adding to the first-chapter-book collection. (Fiction. 5-7)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780763668778
Publisher:
Candlewick Press
Publication date:
02/11/2014
Series:
Candlewick Sparks Series
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
64
Product dimensions:
7.90(w) x 11.80(h) x 0.40(d)
Lexile:
260L (what's this?)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

Read an Excerpt

Annie tickled Simon’s foot with her green comb.
"Yoo-hoo, big brother! Guess what I’ve been doing?"
Simon looked up. "What, Annie?"
"Fixing Hazel’s hair," said Annie. "When I grow up, I’m going to be a hairdresser."
Simon looked at Hazel. Then he turned a page.
"There’s an idea," he said.
Annie combed the hair on top of Simon’s head straight up. She combed the sides straight out. She patted the back down flat. Annie looked at Simon’s head.
"Can I fix your hair, Simon?"
"My hair?" said Simon.
"Hazel hardly has any," said Annie.
Simon stopped reading and sat up. "My hair doesn’t need fixing, Annie."
"It does, too, Simon. Hold still."
Annie laid out the cards. "My turn," she said.
Annie picked up two cards and put them back.
Hazel jumped up and licked Simon’s hairdo. "Hazel, lie down," said Simon. Hazel didn’t.
Simon picked up two cards and two cards and two cards.
"She’ll listen to me, Simon. Hazel, LIE DOWN!"
said Annie.
But Hazel didn’t.
"There," she said. "Now you look pretty."
Annie held up a mirror and showed Simon his new hairdo.
"Holy cow!" said Simon.
"Now let’s play cards," said Annie.
Soon Annie’s hair was all done. And it wouldn’t come undone.
"Eeeeeek!" said Annie.
Hazel leaped and barked at Annie’s hairdo.
"HAZEL, LIE DOWN!" said Annie.
But Hazel didn’t.
"Hey, I won!" said Simon.
"Let’s not play cards," said Annie.
"You know, Annie," said Simon, "if you’re going to be a hairdresser, aybe you should give yourself a new hairdo."
Simon went back to reading his book.
Annie picked up the comb. She combed her hair up and down and all around.
"Hey, this is fun," she said.
"Lord love a duck," said Simon. "It really is stuck."
Simon twisted Annie’s comb a little this way and a little that.
"Ouch!" said Annie. "Maybe I won’t be a hairdresser, Simon. I could be . . . a baker."
"Huh," said Simon. "There’s an idea."
"Can I have a cookie, Simon?"
"What’s up?" asked Simon. He came over to have a look. "Annie, what have you done?"
Annie pulled her sweater over her head. "I wound up my hair and it’s all stuck."
"Let me see," said Simon.
Annie took the sweater off her head.
"There," said Simon. "Now you have your old hairdo back."
Annie held up the mirror to see.
Then she tapped Simon’s head. "Simon, Simon, look! Hazel’s lying down!"
"At last," said Simon. "Here, Annie. Have another cookie."
Simon found a pair of scissors.
"Hold still, Annie. I’ll cut the comb to bits."
"Aaaaaagh!" said Annie.
One by one, Simon snipped off each tooth of Annie’s comb. He wiggled the comb a little this way and a little that. Then he pulled the comb from Annie’s hair.
Annie and Simon munched on their cookies.
"You know what, Simon?"
"What?"
Annie scratched Hazel’s tummy. "When I grow up, I’m going to be a dog trainer."
Simon took a bite of his cookie. "There’s an idea," he said.

***************
ANNIE AND SIMON by Catharine O'Neill. Copyright (c) 2008 by Catharine O'Neill. Published by Candlewick Press, Inc., Cambridge, MA.

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
Annie tickled Simon’s foot with her green comb.
"Yoo-hoo, big brother! Guess what I’ve been doing?"
Simon looked up. "What, Annie?"
"Fixing Hazel’s hair," said Annie. "When I grow up, I’m going to be a hairdresser."
Simon looked at Hazel. Then he turned a page.
"There’s an idea," he said.
Annie combed the hair on top of Simon’s head straight up. She combed the sides straight out. She patted the back down flat. Annie looked at Simon’s head.
"Can I fix your hair, Simon?"
"My hair?" said Simon.
"Hazel hardly has any," said Annie.
Simon stopped reading and sat up. "My hair doesn’t need fixing, Annie."
"It does, too, Simon. Hold still."
Annie laid out the cards. "My turn," she said.
Annie picked up two cards and put them back.
Hazel jumped up and licked Simon’s hairdo. "Hazel, lie down," said Simon. Hazel didn’t.
Simon picked up two cards and two cards and two cards.
"She’ll listen to me, Simon. Hazel, LIE DOWN!"
said Annie.
But Hazel didn’t.
"There," she said. "Now you look pretty."
Annie held up a mirror and showed Simon his new hairdo.
"Holy cow!" said Simon.
"Now let’s play cards," said Annie.
Soon Annie’s hair was all done. And it wouldn’t come undone.
"Eeeeeek!" said Annie.
Hazel leaped and barked at Annie’s hairdo.
"HAZEL, LIE DOWN!" said Annie.
But Hazel didn’t.
"Hey, I won!" said Simon.
"Let’s not play cards," said Annie.
"You know, Annie," said Simon, "if you’re going to be a hairdresser, aybe you should give yourself a new hairdo."
Simon went back to reading his book.
Annie picked up the comb. She combed her hair up and down and all around.
"Hey, this is fun," she said.
"Lord love a duck," said Simon. "It really is stuck."
Simon twisted Annie’s comb a little this way and a little that.
"Ouch!" said Annie. "Maybe I won’t be a hairdresser, Simon. I could be . . . a baker."
"Huh," said Simon. "There’s an idea."
"Can I have a cookie, Simon?"
"What’s up?" asked Simon. He came over to have a look. "Annie, what have you done?"
Annie pulled her sweater over her head. "I wound up my hair and it’s all stuck."
"Let me see," said Simon.
Annie took the sweater off her head.
"There," said Simon. "Now you have your old hairdo back."
Annie held up the mirror to see.
Then she tapped Simon’s head. "Simon, Simon, look! Hazel’s lying down!"
"At last," said Simon. "Here, Annie. Have another cookie."
Simon found a pair of scissors.
"Hold still, Annie. I’ll cut the comb to bits."
"Aaaaaagh!" said Annie.
One by one, Simon snipped off each tooth of Annie’s comb. He wiggled the comb a little this way and a little that. Then he pulled the comb from Annie’s hair.
Annie and Simon munched on their cookies.
"You know what, Simon?"
"What?"
Annie scratched Hazel’s tummy. "When I grow up, I’m going to be a dog trainer."
Simon took a bite of his cookie. "There’s an idea," he said.

***************
ANNIE AND SIMON by Catharine O'Neill. Copyright (c) 2008 by Catharine O'Neill. Published by Candlewick Press, Inc., Cambridge, MA.

Meet the Author

Catharine O’Neill is the illustrator of many books for children. The inspiration for ANNIE AND SIMON, she says, "came from my daughter and her two quite a bit older half-brothers, who were, mostly, very patient. And, of course, from our dog, Hazel!" She lives in upstate New York.

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