Annie and Simon: The Sneeze and Other Stories

Annie and Simon: The Sneeze and Other Stories

by Catharine O'Neill
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

A chatty little girl and her patient older brother share an easy bond in a charming early chapter book filled with warmth and wry humor.

Annie and Simon: little sister and big, big brother. Annie likes to talk — a lot — about what she’s going to be when she grows up, about the clouds and rain and umbrellas, about picnics in the park and

Overview

A chatty little girl and her patient older brother share an easy bond in a charming early chapter book filled with warmth and wry humor.

Annie and Simon: little sister and big, big brother. Annie likes to talk — a lot — about what she’s going to be when she grows up, about the clouds and rain and umbrellas, about picnics in the park and meteors, about loons and canoes and turtles. And Simon is a very good listener. He knows a lot about the stars and the weather, how to fix bee stings, and where to look for loons. He knows a lot about being the kind of big brother that keeps a little sister smiling. Whether they are poking around the garden or paddling through a marsh, curious Annie and patient Simon are siblings who are clearly happy in each other’s company.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Eric Slay
This book is about the four "everyday" adventures of a big brother and his little sister. Each chapter-length story relies on the tender relationship Annie has with her much-older brother, who demonstrates patience and kindness to her and her curiosities. For independent reading, this story is at a second-grade level; as a read-aloud, it is suitable for kindergarten or first grade. However, the short stories are driven mostly by conversations between Annie and Simon as they go about their day, and this may detract from the flow of the story as a read-aloud because it can be hard for the listeners to follow. It will be a great title for independent readers who can imagine the conversations as they read. Additionally, it is a wonderful way to introduce children to dialog and the type of sentence structure that uses quotation marks—which is a second grade state standard. An entertaining tale that will appeal to both boy and girl students. Reviewer: Eric Slay
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2—Annie, a prereader, loves to draw and has an incredibly patient, attentive big brother; their interactions are chronicled throughout four chapters in this book for fluent beginning readers. The first chapter takes place at a lake where the siblings look for living things for Annie to draw: a frog, a crayfish, a clam, and a dragonfly. Simon gently suggests that she make some changes to her work and provides some interesting facts about the creatures. In the second chapter, Annie is convinced that Simon is sick because he is sneezing and has a warm forehead. Her efforts to care for him require her brother's help, but he is finally able to rest when he reads a book to Annie. In the third chapter, Simon postpones looking at Annie's new pictures until he reads "three hundred and six" more pages of his book while reclining in a hammock. Annie impatiently waits and becomes distracted by the neighbor's cat, and wishes her dog, Hazel, had some feline attributes. She tries to convince Simon that she has taught Hazel to purr. In the concluding chapter, Simon and Annie gather horse chestnuts and later must track them down when a squirrel buries them. Readers will enjoy the clever, humorous ending for each chapter, and adults may appreciate opportunities to extend the tales with informational texts about aquatic and domestic animals. Expressive, distinctive watercolor paintings depict the love and activities these siblings share in a quaint frame house in the country.—Laura Scott, Farmington Community Library, MI
Kirkus Reviews
Four more emergent-reader episodes featuring little Annie, her "big, big brother," Simon, and bucketloads of sibling togetherness. O'Neill opens with a thematic link to Annie and Simon (2008). Simon (still) has trouble telling Annie's drawings of a crayfish and a dragonfly apart but answers her skeptical response to his claim that frogs have knees ("Oh, Simon. Tee-hee. Tee-hee. Tee-hee-hee") with nature facts until she admiringly asks him if he knows everything. "Well," says Simon, "I hate to brag." In subsequent episodes, Simon's sneeze unleashes a patiently borne flood of little-sister TLC; Annie's efforts to get her dog Hazel to purr end abruptly when she sees the neighbor's cat stroll by with a mouse in his mouth; and the sudden disappearance of a wagonload of horse chestnuts left on the porch sparks a bit of detective work. In the author's informal, loosely brushed watercolors, the gangly figures fit comfortably in outdoorsy suburban and cozy domestic settings. Their mutual attachment is clearly expressed in gestures, expressions, eye contact and, in the final scene, a tender smooch on the head by Simon: "You know," he says, "you're my favorite little sister." "I know," says Annie. Would that all sib relationships were so harmonious. (Early reader. 5-7)
From the Publisher
Annie tickled Simon’s foot with her green comb.
"Yoo-hoo, big brother! Guess what I’ve been doing?"
Simon looked up. "What, Annie?"
"Fixing Hazel’s hair," said Annie. "When I grow up, I’m going to be a hairdresser."
Simon looked at Hazel. Then he turned a page.
"There’s an idea," he said.
Annie combed the hair on top of Simon’s head straight up. She combed the sides straight out. She patted the back down flat. Annie looked at Simon’s head.
"Can I fix your hair, Simon?"
"My hair?" said Simon.
"Hazel hardly has any," said Annie.
Simon stopped reading and sat up. "My hair doesn’t need fixing, Annie."
"It does, too, Simon. Hold still."
Annie laid out the cards. "My turn," she said.
Annie picked up two cards and put them back.
Hazel jumped up and licked Simon’s hairdo. "Hazel, lie down," said Simon. Hazel didn’t.
Simon picked up two cards and two cards and two cards.
"She’ll listen to me, Simon. Hazel, LIE DOWN!"
said Annie.
But Hazel didn’t.
"There," she said. "Now you look pretty."
Annie held up a mirror and showed Simon his new hairdo.
"Holy cow!" said Simon.
"Now let’s play cards," said Annie.
Soon Annie’s hair was all done. And it wouldn’t come undone.
"Eeeeeek!" said Annie.
Hazel leaped and barked at Annie’s hairdo.
"HAZEL, LIE DOWN!" said Annie.
But Hazel didn’t.
"Hey, I won!" said Simon.
"Let’s not play cards," said Annie.
"You know, Annie," said Simon, "if you’re going to be a hairdresser, aybe you should give yourself a new hairdo."
Simon went back to reading his book.
Annie picked up the comb. She combed her hair up and down and all around.
"Hey, this is fun," she said.
"Lord love a duck," said Simon. "It really is stuck."
Simon twisted Annie’s comb a little this way and a little that.
"Ouch!" said Annie. "Maybe I won’t be a hairdresser, Simon. I could be . . . a baker."
"Huh," said Simon. "There’s an idea."
"Can I have a cookie, Simon?"
"What’s up?" asked Simon. He came over to have a look. "Annie, what have you done?"
Annie pulled her sweater over her head. "I wound up my hair and it’s all stuck."
"Let me see," said Simon.
Annie took the sweater off her head.
"There," said Simon. "Now you have your old hairdo back."
Annie held up the mirror to see.
Then she tapped Simon’s head. "Simon, Simon, look! Hazel’s lying down!"
"At last," said Simon. "Here, Annie. Have another cookie."
Simon found a pair of scissors.
"Hold still, Annie. I’ll cut the comb to bits."
"Aaaaaagh!" said Annie.
One by one, Simon snipped off each tooth of Annie’s comb. He wiggled the comb a little this way and a little that. Then he pulled the comb from Annie’s hair.
Annie and Simon munched on their cookies.
"You know what, Simon?"
"What?"
Annie scratched Hazel’s tummy. "When I grow up, I’m going to be a dog trainer."
Simon took a bite of his cookie. "There’s an idea," he said.

***************
ANNIE AND SIMON by Catharine O'Neill. Copyright (c) 2008 by Catharine O'Neill. Published by Candlewick Press, Inc., Cambridge, MA.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780763649210
Publisher:
Candlewick Press
Publication date:
05/14/2013
Series:
Candlewick Sparks Series
Pages:
64
Sales rank:
1,241,859
Product dimensions:
6.30(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.60(d)
Lexile:
300L (what's this?)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

Related Subjects

Read an Excerpt

Annie tickled Simon’s foot with her green comb.
"Yoo-hoo, big brother! Guess what I’ve been doing?"
Simon looked up. "What, Annie?"
"Fixing Hazel’s hair," said Annie. "When I grow up, I’m going to be a hairdresser."
Simon looked at Hazel. Then he turned a page.
"There’s an idea," he said.
Annie combed the hair on top of Simon’s head straight up. She combed the sides straight out. She patted the back down flat. Annie looked at Simon’s head.
"Can I fix your hair, Simon?"
"My hair?" said Simon.
"Hazel hardly has any," said Annie.
Simon stopped reading and sat up. "My hair doesn’t need fixing, Annie."
"It does, too, Simon. Hold still."
Annie laid out the cards. "My turn," she said.
Annie picked up two cards and put them back.
Hazel jumped up and licked Simon’s hairdo. "Hazel, lie down," said Simon. Hazel didn’t.
Simon picked up two cards and two cards and two cards.
"She’ll listen to me, Simon. Hazel, LIE DOWN!"
said Annie.
But Hazel didn’t.
"There," she said. "Now you look pretty."
Annie held up a mirror and showed Simon his new hairdo.
"Holy cow!" said Simon.
"Now let’s play cards," said Annie.
Soon Annie’s hair was all done. And it wouldn’t come undone.
"Eeeeeek!" said Annie.
Hazel leaped and barked at Annie’s hairdo.
"HAZEL, LIE DOWN!" said Annie.
But Hazel didn’t.
"Hey, I won!" said Simon.
"Let’s not play cards," said Annie.
"You know, Annie," said Simon, "if you’re going to be a hairdresser, aybe you should give yourself a new hairdo."
Simon went back to reading his book.
Annie picked up the comb. She combed her hair up and down and all around.
"Hey, this is fun," she said.
"Lord love a duck," said Simon. "It really is stuck."
Simon twisted Annie’s comb a little this way and a little that.
"Ouch!" said Annie. "Maybe I won’t be a hairdresser, Simon. I could be . . . a baker."
"Huh," said Simon. "There’s an idea."
"Can I have a cookie, Simon?"
"What’s up?" asked Simon. He came over to have a look. "Annie, what have you done?"
Annie pulled her sweater over her head. "I wound up my hair and it’s all stuck."
"Let me see," said Simon.
Annie took the sweater off her head.
"There," said Simon. "Now you have your old hairdo back."
Annie held up the mirror to see.
Then she tapped Simon’s head. "Simon, Simon, look! Hazel’s lying down!"
"At last," said Simon. "Here, Annie. Have another cookie."
Simon found a pair of scissors.
"Hold still, Annie. I’ll cut the comb to bits."
"Aaaaaagh!" said Annie.
One by one, Simon snipped off each tooth of Annie’s comb. He wiggled the comb a little this way and a little that. Then he pulled the comb from Annie’s hair.
Annie and Simon munched on their cookies.
"You know what, Simon?"
"What?"
Annie scratched Hazel’s tummy. "When I grow up, I’m going to be a dog trainer."
Simon took a bite of his cookie. "There’s an idea," he said.

***************
ANNIE AND SIMON by Catharine O'Neill. Copyright (c) 2008 by Catharine O'Neill. Published by Candlewick Press, Inc., Cambridge, MA.

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
Annie tickled Simon’s foot with her green comb.
"Yoo-hoo, big brother! Guess what I’ve been doing?"
Simon looked up. "What, Annie?"
"Fixing Hazel’s hair," said Annie. "When I grow up, I’m going to be a hairdresser."
Simon looked at Hazel. Then he turned a page.
"There’s an idea," he said.
Annie combed the hair on top of Simon’s head straight up. She combed the sides straight out. She patted the back down flat. Annie looked at Simon’s head.
"Can I fix your hair, Simon?"
"My hair?" said Simon.
"Hazel hardly has any," said Annie.
Simon stopped reading and sat up. "My hair doesn’t need fixing, Annie."
"It does, too, Simon. Hold still."
Annie laid out the cards. "My turn," she said.
Annie picked up two cards and put them back.
Hazel jumped up and licked Simon’s hairdo. "Hazel, lie down," said Simon. Hazel didn’t.
Simon picked up two cards and two cards and two cards.
"She’ll listen to me, Simon. Hazel, LIE DOWN!"
said Annie.
But Hazel didn’t.
"There," she said. "Now you look pretty."
Annie held up a mirror and showed Simon his new hairdo.
"Holy cow!" said Simon.
"Now let’s play cards," said Annie.
Soon Annie’s hair was all done. And it wouldn’t come undone.
"Eeeeeek!" said Annie.
Hazel leaped and barked at Annie’s hairdo.
"HAZEL, LIE DOWN!" said Annie.
But Hazel didn’t.
"Hey, I won!" said Simon.
"Let’s not play cards," said Annie.
"You know, Annie," said Simon, "if you’re going to be a hairdresser, aybe you should give yourself a new hairdo."
Simon went back to reading his book.
Annie picked up the comb. She combed her hair up and down and all around.
"Hey, this is fun," she said.
"Lord love a duck," said Simon. "It really is stuck."
Simon twisted Annie’s comb a little this way and a little that.
"Ouch!" said Annie. "Maybe I won’t be a hairdresser, Simon. I could be . . . a baker."
"Huh," said Simon. "There’s an idea."
"Can I have a cookie, Simon?"
"What’s up?" asked Simon. He came over to have a look. "Annie, what have you done?"
Annie pulled her sweater over her head. "I wound up my hair and it’s all stuck."
"Let me see," said Simon.
Annie took the sweater off her head.
"There," said Simon. "Now you have your old hairdo back."
Annie held up the mirror to see.
Then she tapped Simon’s head. "Simon, Simon, look! Hazel’s lying down!"
"At last," said Simon. "Here, Annie. Have another cookie."
Simon found a pair of scissors.
"Hold still, Annie. I’ll cut the comb to bits."
"Aaaaaagh!" said Annie.
One by one, Simon snipped off each tooth of Annie’s comb. He wiggled the comb a little this way and a little that. Then he pulled the comb from Annie’s hair.
Annie and Simon munched on their cookies.
"You know what, Simon?"
"What?"
Annie scratched Hazel’s tummy. "When I grow up, I’m going to be a dog trainer."
Simon took a bite of his cookie. "There’s an idea," he said.

***************
ANNIE AND SIMON by Catharine O'Neill. Copyright (c) 2008 by Catharine O'Neill. Published by Candlewick Press, Inc., Cambridge, MA.

Meet the Author

Catharine O’Neill is the illustrator of many books for children. The inspiration for ANNIE AND SIMON, she says, "came from my daughter and her two quite a bit older half-brothers, who were, mostly, very patient. And, of course, from our dog, Hazel!" She lives in upstate New York.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >