The Annotated Wizard of Oz

( 13 )

Overview

In celebration of the 100th anniversary of its publication, a beautifully illustrated annotation of ?The Wizard of Oz?, complete with an exact reproduction of the original 1900 edition.The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is the quintessential American fairy tale. Michael Patrick Hearn, the world's leading Oz scholar, now provides a fascinating new annotation that not only reacquaints readers with the Tin Woodman, Scarecrow, and Cowardly Lion, but also illuminates the colorful background of this treasured American classic....
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Hardcover (A Centennial Edition)
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Overview

In celebration of the 100th anniversary of its publication, a beautifully illustrated annotation of ?The Wizard of Oz?, complete with an exact reproduction of the original 1900 edition.The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is the quintessential American fairy tale. Michael Patrick Hearn, the world's leading Oz scholar, now provides a fascinating new annotation that not only reacquaints readers with the Tin Woodman, Scarecrow, and Cowardly Lion, but also illuminates the colorful background of this treasured American classic. This edition explores numerous contemporary references, provides character sources, and explains the actual meaning of the word "Oz." A facsimile of the rare 1900 first edition appears with the original drawings by W.W. Denslow, as well as 25 previously unpublished illustrations. There is a bibliography of L. Frank Baum's published work, every notable "Oz" edition, and the stage and cinematic productions from 1939's The Wizard of Oz, to the 1974 Broadway hit, The Wiz. A beautiful, awe-inspiring work, ?The Annotated Wizard of Oz? is an enduring tribute to the timeless joy of ?The Wizard of Oz?, and a classic to rival Baum's own.
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Editorial Reviews

James Thurber
“I have never known or heard of an American man or woman who has started to read ?The Wonderful Wizard of Oz? and put it down without finishing it.”
William Styron
“If you ever talk to anyone who has written, you'll always find a childhood in which, somewhere along the line, there's a 'Wizard of Oz.'”
Salman Rushdie
“Seeing 'The Wizard of Oz' made a writer of me.”
Salman Rushdie
“Seeing ?The Wizard of Oz? made a writer of me.”
Library Journal
We're off to see the Wizard! Many readers of this annotated version of arguably the most famous American fairly tale will be surprised to learn that the 1939 MGM movie musical was based on a best-selling children's book written 100 years ago; far more readers will be astonished to find out that The Wizard was followed by a good 40 sequels, many as popular as the first Oz tale by Baum and illustrator Denslow. This volume reproduces Denslow's color drawings from the first edition (1900) and includes previously unpublished illustrations. Despite the popularity of that work, whose copyright author and illustrator shared, the two never collaborated again. As the self-styled Royal Historian of Oz, Baum went on to write 13 more Oz adventures; his mantel was then passed to Ruth Plumly Thompson, editor of the Philadelphia Public Ledger's Sunday children's page, who produced an additional 19 titles. John R. Neill, illustrator of all the Oz books but the first, then wrote three more sequels, and since his death in 1943 (Baum died in 1919), numerous others have tried their hand at an Oz story. So powerful was the book's spell that its Russian translator, Aleksandr Volkov, wrote several sequels of his own in Russian for Soviet citizens. Hearn, described by the publisher as "the world's leading Oz scholar," mines The Wizard in this wide-ranging assay of the multifarious strands that fed the imaginations of Baum and Denslow. His explanations and conjectures are enhanced by commentary from such luminaries as Salman Rushdie and Gore Vidal. Of comparable weight to the annotations are the extensive biographical sketches of Baum and Denslow, which elucidate the era in which the book was conceived. Theannotations can wander at times, perhaps unavoidably, into tenuous speculation or somewhat irrelevant asides, yet the book is invaluable in pointing out discrepancies that generations of children have wondered about (why the Munchkins live in the east of in some of the Oz books, at other times in the west). And those who know both book and film will delight in discovering why, e.g., the book's Silver Shoes became the film's Ruby Slippers. Hearn, unlike Martin Gardner, the author of The Annotated Alice (LJ 12/99), had many sequels and a film to treat. His painstaking annotation shows us Baum's Wizard as a whiz of a wiz if ever a wiz there was. Highly recommended. [Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 5/15/00.]--Edward Cone, New York Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.\
Booknews
The first striking thing about this book is its elegant dust jacket made to look like a copper plate. But the eye candy stretches past the front cover, nearly every page with either color illustrations or distinctive frames, fleurons, and figures around the text. Not surprising to those who've taken some literature classes, the annotations following a page of text are often far longer than whatever bit of text they illustrate. But if the reader should find academicism beside the point, annotations are easy to skip because Baum's story is written in larger type. This edition is for both kids and kiddie litters, the latter interested in such tidbits as the Dorothy-type farmgirl character called Dot, Dolly, and Doris in other works by Frank Baum, and the reigning theory that Dorothy lived in Kansas, yes, but more specifically, Topeka. Reprinted from the 1900 edition with many of the original drawings by W.W. Denslow. Oversize: 9.5x10.5<">. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780393049923
  • Publisher: Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
  • Publication date: 9/17/2000
  • Series: Annotated Books Series, #1
  • Edition description: A Centennial Edition
  • Pages: 432
  • Sales rank: 152,844
  • Product dimensions: 8.90 (w) x 10.30 (h) x 1.50 (d)

Meet the Author

L. Frank Baum (1856-1919) was an American author, poet, playwright, actor, and independent filmmaker best known today as the creator—along with illustrator W. W. Denslow—of one of the most popular books in American children's literature, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. He wrote thirteen Oz sequels, nine other fantasy novels, and a plethora of other works, and brought several of his works to the stage and screen. His is known to his fans as "The Royal Historian of Oz."

Michael Patrick Hearn has written for the New York Times, The Nation, and many other publications. His books include From the Silver Age to Stalin: Russian Children's Book Illustration and The Porcelain Cat; he has edited The Victorian Fairy Tale Book, The Annotated Wizard of Oz, The Annotated Christmas Carol, and The Annotated Huckleberry Finn. Hearn lives in New York City.

W. W. Denslow (1856-1915) was a prolific illustrator, cartoonist, and caricaturist, best remembered for his work in collaboration with author L. Frank Baum, especially his illustrations of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, the first of the Oz books. An editorial cartoonist with a strong interest in politics, Denslow also illustrated his own books including Denslow's Mother Goose (1901), Denslow's Night Before Christmas (1902) and the 18-volume Denslow's Picture Books series (1903-4). The royalties from the print and stage versions of The Wizard of Oz were sufficient to allow Denslow to purchase Bluck's Island in Bermuda, and crown himself King Denslow I. However, he drank his money away, and he died in obscurity, of pneumonia.

Martin Gardner (1914-2010) is the author of more than seventy books, including Fads and Fallacies in the Name of Science, The Annotated Alice, The Annotated Hunting of the Snark, and The Colossal Book of Mathematics.

Biography

Dorothy, Toto, the Scarecrow, Aunt Em -- where would our national psyche be without The Wonderful Wizard of Oz? L. Frank Baum, who created a story with an indelible, sometimes haunting impression on so many people, led a life that had a fairy-tale quality of its own.

Baum was born in 1856 to a family that had made a fortune in the oil business. Because he had a heart condition, his parents arranged for him to be tutored privately at the family’s Syracuse estate, “Roselawn.” As an adult, though, Baum flourished and failed at a dizzying variety of ventures, from writing plays to a stint with his family’s medicinal oil business (where he produced a potion called “Baum’s Castorine”), to managing a general store, to editing the Aberdeen Pioneer in Aberdeen, South Dakota. In 1897, following his mother-in-law’s advice, Baum wrote down the stories that he told his children. The firm of Way & Williams published the stories under the title Mother Goose in Prose, with illustrations by Maxfield Parrish, and Baum’s career as a writer was launched.

With the publication of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz in 1900, Baum gained instant success. The book, lavishly produced and featuring voluptuous illustrations by William Wallace Denslow, was the bestselling children’s book of the year. It also set a new standard for children’s literature. As a commentator for the September 8, 1900 New York Times described it, “The crudeness that was characteristic of the oldtime publications...would now be enough to cause the modern child to yell with rage and vigor...” The reviewer praised the book’s sheer entertainment value (its “bright and joyous atmosphere”) and likened it to The Story of the Three Bears for its enduring value. As the film industry emerged in the following years, few books were as manifestly destined for adaptation, and although it took almost four decades for a movie studio to translate Baum’s vision to film, the 1939 film did for the movies what Baum’s book had done for children’s literature: that is, raised the imaginative and technical bar higher than it had been before.

The loss of parents, the inevitable voyage toward independence, the yearning for home -- in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, Baum touched upon a child’s primal experiences while providing a rousing story of adventure. As his health declined, Baum continued the series with 14 more Oz books (his publisher commissioned more by other authors after his death), but none had quite the effect on the reading public that the first one did. Baum died from complications of a stroke in 1919.

Good To Know

Baum founded the National Association of Window Trimmers and published a magazine for the window-trimming trade – he also raised exotic chickens.

Buam was married to Maud Gage, a daughter of the famous women’s rights advocate Matilda Joslyn Gage.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Floyd Akers, Laura Bancroft, George Brooks, Edith Van Dyne, Schuyler Staunton, John Estes Cooke, Suzanne Metcalf, Louis F. Baum, Lyman Frank Baum (full name)
    1. Date of Birth:
      May 15, 1856
    2. Place of Birth:
      Chittenango, New York
    1. Date of Death:
      May 6, 1919
    2. Place of Death:
      Hollywood, California

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 13 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 13 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 16, 2009

    Present for a huge Wizard of Oz fan

    Bought this as a Christmas present for our daughter who is a huge Wizard of Oz fan. She absolutely loves this book--she's not very easily impressed. I strongly recommend this book for the hard to please Wizard of Oz fan on your shopping list.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 4, 2009

    a NICE BOOK

    It was a very good 100th annerversiry additon. I enjoyed the extras that were included and the workmanship of the book

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 14, 2003

    Still one of the best!

    If you like to send your imagination to far away lands filled with magical and imaginative things, the Wizard of Oz is a must. It is a great way to spark interest in a child or adult who do not normally enjoy reading. It inspired my son to read the entire Wizard of Oz series, which led to him reading entire stacks of various books.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 10, 2001

    A WONDERFUL STORY!

    I feel that this book was outstanding! It told why things were named that and how everything came into place with the movie vs. the book. I never knew some of the scenes that took place until I read the book.. I couldn't put it down.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 7, 2001

    Not Just a Movie

    I, in my own opinion, think that THE WIZARD OF OZ is a wonderful and thrilling book. I am shocked and hurt to find that people don't see this book as a novel, but as a movie made in 1939. I think that if people would open their minds and look at this book and pay attention, they would look at the book and/or the movie differently.

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    Posted January 17, 2010

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    Posted December 5, 2009

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    Posted February 10, 2010

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    Posted March 15, 2010

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    Posted September 18, 2010

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    Posted March 27, 2010

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