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Annual Abbrwa of ll|p Jlreatfont REV. SAMUEL A. ELIOT, D.D. We often speak of the Unitarian habit of mind. It is the habit of independent judgment, of manly reverence, of bringing things to the bar of a sturdy common sense, the ...
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Annual Report

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Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
Annual Abbrwa of ll|p Jlreatfont REV. SAMUEL A. ELIOT, D.D. We often speak of the Unitarian habit of mind. It is the habit of independent judgment, of manly reverence, of bringing things to the bar of a sturdy common sense, the habit of proving all things and holding fast to what is good. Is there also a Unitarian type of character? I think there is. It is a certain habit of life that is continually being illustrated and tested in the experience of a number of American families of Unitarian training. It is the habit of plain living and high thinking which is part of the New England inheritance of the majority of the people of our fellowship,—the habit of self-reliance, candid speech, tenacious purpose, upright dealing, and generous public spirit. The roll of the fellow-workers lost from our earthly fellowship during the past twelve months is, as usual, a list of names distinguished for resolute independency of mind and spirit, high integrity, and honorable public service. I mention General Wilmon W. Blackmar, com- mander-in-chief of the Grand Army of the Republic, a genial comrade, a successful man of affairs, a steady supporter of the institutions through which a free people cultivate patriotism and piety; Hon. George W. Bemis, long treasurer of the State of Iowa, who illustrated in the public service the republican ideal of the simple,industrious life, guided by deep convictions and affections; Judge Joseph W. Fellows of Manchester, an able and honorable lawyer, pre-eminent at the New Hampshire bar; Edward Atkinson of Brookline, who wrestled with extraordinary ingenuity and grasp with many difficult problems affecting the welfare of the people of this and other lands, a man patient under misrepresentation, firm in principle, displaying throughout a long career the New E...
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940029619303
  • Publisher: The Association
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: Digitized from 1898 volume
  • File size: 972 KB

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Annual Abbrwa of ll|p Jlreatfont REV. SAMUEL A. ELIOT, D.D. We often speak of the Unitarian habit of mind. It is the habit of independent judgment, of manly reverence, of bringing things to the bar of a sturdy common sense, the habit of proving all things and holding fast to what is good. Is there also a Unitarian type of character? I think there is. It is a certain habit of life that is continually being illustrated and tested in the experience of a number of American families of Unitarian training. It is the habit of plain living and high thinking which is part of the New England inheritance of the majority of the people of our fellowship,—the habit of self-reliance, candid speech, tenacious purpose, upright dealing, and generous public spirit. The roll of the fellow-workers lost from our earthly fellowship during the past twelve months is, as usual, a list of names distinguished for resolute independency of mind and spirit, high integrity, and honorable public service. I mention General Wilmon W. Blackmar, com- mander-in-chief of the Grand Army of the Republic, a genial comrade, a successful man of affairs, a steady supporter of the institutions through which a free people cultivate patriotism and piety; Hon. George W. Bemis, long treasurer of the State of Iowa, who illustrated in the public service the republican ideal of the simple,industrious life, guided by deep convictions and affections; Judge Joseph W. Fellows of Manchester, an able and honorable lawyer, pre-eminent at the New Hampshire bar; Edward Atkinson of Brookline, who wrestled with extraordinary ingenuity and grasp with many difficult problems affecting the welfare of the people of this and other lands, a manpatient under misrepresentation, firm in principle, displaying throughout a long career the New E...
Read More Show Less

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