Overview


Life for Davy was glorious as long as he had his mother and father to himself. But then he got a brother, Petey. When Davy sang, Petey cried. When Davy created a masterpiece, Petey spat up on it.
And then he got another brother, Mike! And another, Stu! And another, Gil! Until he had TWELVE LITTLE BROTHERS! And that was only the beginning!
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Overview


Life for Davy was glorious as long as he had his mother and father to himself. But then he got a brother, Petey. When Davy sang, Petey cried. When Davy created a masterpiece, Petey spat up on it.
And then he got another brother, Mike! And another, Stu! And another, Gil! Until he had TWELVE LITTLE BROTHERS! And that was only the beginning!
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Editorial Reviews

Pamela Paul
Cordell emphasizes the humor in the once only child's whiplash of conflicting emotions. Baby brothers may be a pain, but the havoc they create can be painfully funny.
—The New York Times
Publishers Weekly
Cordell’s (Trouble Gum) goofy line drawings of Davy the sheep and his dozen copycat younger brothers provide an entertaining counterpoint to his poker-faced narrative. When Davy’s parents, sitting in armchairs, dispense wisdom about copying—“It’s only a phase, Davy”—Cordell’s drawing makes it clear that sheep (at least this pair) don’t really fit into armchairs. Mom’s legs stick straight out in front of her, and Dad is slowly heading for the floor. A riotous sequence shows Davy’s brothers chorusing “no” back at him, burping when he burps, and singing “la-la-la” along with him when he sticks his hooves in his ears in frustration. The brothers eventually lose interest, and Davy gets lonely—but only until an even smaller copycat arrives: “When he banged his elbow in the bathroom, Davy yelled, ‘honkin’ plunger!’ From the next room came a little voice, ‘honkin’ plunger!’ ” Cordell’s sympathy lies entirely with Davy, and he’s in it for the laughs (he milks a lot of storytelling humor from the repetition of the 12 sheep’s names). To the extent that there’s a message, it’s that younger siblings are adoring, fickle, and not going anywhere. Ages 4–6. (Jan.)
From the Publisher
“Older brothers and sisters will surely relate to Davy’s sibling struggles, but even younger sibs will have a baaaaa-ll with this one.”—BCCB

 

"Cordell emphasizes the humor in the once only child’s whiplash of conflicting emotions. Baby brothers may be a pain, but the havoc they create can be painfully funny." —NYTimes.com

 

“Funny and touching in equal measure, this is a sheepish look at how imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, even when it is super annoying.” —Booklist

 

“Cordell’s (Trouble Gum) goofy line drawings of Davy the sheep and his dozen copycat younger brothers provide an entertaining counterpoint to his poker-faced narrative.” —Publishers Weekly

 

“This is not just another new-baby book: Cordell’s humorous text and mischievously silly, expressive cartoon art will have readers bleating to read it again and again.” —Kirkus, Starred Review

Children's Literature - Marilyn Courtot
Were you the oldest child? Did you have siblings come quickly or after a few years of your parent's undivided attention? The latter is the situation faced by Davy, the apple of his parents' eyes. Then one day a brother named Petey appeared and suddenly his parent's attention was diverted to this younger brother. Well, it didn't stop with Petey; then came Mike and Stu until there were a dozen brothers. What happened next was a real surprise for Davy: his brothers started to follow his every step and do whatever he did. It was beginning to drive him crazy, but his parents assured him that his brothers were just going through a phase and soon they would stop copying everything that Davy did. The pen and ink illustrations show the family as sheep and the pictures are really amusing with Davy walking like he is at the head of a parade or acting silly and having all his brothers mimic his every move. But one day things did indeed change. The brothers started acting on their own and then Davy realized what it was like to be all alone. He had no playmates and so he went to bed alone, but when he woke up there was an even greater surprise. A truly delightful book for any child who has dealt with siblings and just plain fun for everyone else. Reviewer: Marilyn Courtot
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 3—In the beginning, it was Mom, Dad, and Davy. For years, the little sheep basked in the love of his small family. Then along came Petey, then Mike, and then Stu. The formerly close-knit family eventually becomes a mob, and Davy is stuck with "12 WHOLE BROTHERS," who nightmarishly copy his every move. Dad explains to Davy, "When they get older, your brothers will have their own interests. Then they won't copy you." It takes a while, but his father's prediction eventually comes to pass, much to Davy's chagrin. The pen-and-ink and watercolor artwork is filled with humorous detail. Think Richard Scarry's warmth and scale, with a minimalist approach to setting. The psychology of the oldest child is well chronicled here. With a delightfully fulfilling ending, Davy (and readers) realize that being the one and only sometimes means being alone, and lonely. The story is a great way to discuss life as a half-empty or half-full vessel, and the very human struggles of sibling rivalry.—Sara Lissa Paulson, American Sign Language and English Lower School PS 347, New York City
Kirkus Reviews
Davy, a little sheep, has trouble adjusting to the arrival of not one but 12 baby brothers in this humorous twist on the tried and true new sibling theme. Although Davy was his parents' adored only lamb, "things change." In the space of two page openings, he suddenly has a dozen little brothers wagging their tails behind him. True to their ovine nature--and much to his chagrin--the little sheep copy Davy's every move. When he complains, his exhausted parents say that his flock of siblings imitates him out of admiration, reassuring him that as they grow and find their own interests they will let him be. This can't happen soon enough for poor, beleaguered Davy, who can't even groan without a dozen echoes of "ugh" bleating forth--or can it? When the day comes that his brothers do stop mimicking him, Davy feels alone and bereft until he hears a voice echoing his once more--but this time it comes not from another brother, but from a new sister, a downright "darling ewe." This is not just another new-baby book: Cordell's humorous text and mischievously silly, expressive cartoon art will have readers bleating to read it again and again. (Picture book. 4-8)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781466810648
  • Publisher: Feiwel & Friends
  • Publication date: 1/31/2012
  • Sold by: Macmillan
  • Format: NOOK Kids
  • Pages: 40
  • Age range: 4 - 6 Years
  • File size: 6 MB

Meet the Author


Matthew Cordell wrote and illustrated Trouble Gum, published by Feiwel and Friends. He has also illustrated several picture books, including Mighty Casey by James Preller, and the novel Justin Case: School, Drool, and Other Daily Disasters, by Rachel Vail. He lives outside Chicago with his lovely wife, the author Julie Halpern, their adorable daughter, and their generally well-mannered cat. Visit him online at matthewcordell.com.

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