Another Bullshit Night in Suck City

( 24 )

Overview

"A stunningly beautiful new memoir . . . a near-perfect work of literature." —Stephen Elliot, San Francisco Chronicle
Nick Flynn met his father when he was working as a caseworker in a homeless shelter in Boston. As a teenager he'd received letters from this stranger father, a self-proclaimed poet and con man doing time in federal prison for bank robbery. Another Bullshit Night in Suck City tells the story of the trajectory that led Nick and his father onto the streets, into ...

See more details below
Paperback (Reprint)
$11.24
BN.com price
(Save 24%)$14.95 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (48) from $3.74   
  • New (14) from $8.61   
  • Used (34) from $3.74   
Another Bullshit Night in Suck City: A Memoir

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.49
BN.com price
(Save 29%)$14.95 List Price

Overview

"A stunningly beautiful new memoir . . . a near-perfect work of literature." —Stephen Elliot, San Francisco Chronicle
Nick Flynn met his father when he was working as a caseworker in a homeless shelter in Boston. As a teenager he'd received letters from this stranger father, a self-proclaimed poet and con man doing time in federal prison for bank robbery. Another Bullshit Night in Suck City tells the story of the trajectory that led Nick and his father onto the streets, into that shelter, and finally to each other.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Vendela Vida - New York Times Book Review
“Flynn has written a potent, distinctive autobiography.... Flynn's talents are considerable—he has a compelling voice and wry sense of humor, especially about himself.”
Michael Mewshaw - Washington Post
“The prose swirls in graceful arcs that frequently rise to the level of poetry, leavened by mordant humor.... It's a powerful tale, stylishly told.”
Devin Friedman - GQ
“In a perverse act of divine intervention, a life worth writing about was bestowed on a man actually able to write—in startling, beautiful, unsentimental prose.... It is crammed with beauty and wisdom, and everyone will love it.”
Elissa Schappel - Vanity Fair
“A remarkable feat: a clear-eyed, inventive, and astonishingly honest guided tour of hell.”
Darren Reidy - Village Voice
“Flynn's authentic voice... holds us rapt, keeping both the tragic and the redemptive possibilities open.”
Thomas Curwen - Los Angeles Times Book Review
“Told with energy, critical reflection and sensitivity, 'Another Bullshit Night in Suck City' is less a memoir than a study of one of America's darker conundrums: homelessness.”
Kate Bolick - Boston Globe
“[Flynn's] story is eerie testimony to the potent influence of an absent parent. But Nick, a poet, is too subtle a writer to say so outright, and instead lets us draw our own conclusions with a delicate, poetic logic.”
Troy Patterson - Entertainment Weekly
“Unlike the pity parties that too many memoirs have become, 'Night' has no maudlin gestures, no 'inspirational' tones, no hysterics; it stares down emptiness with clear, dry eyes.”
A.M. Homes

?Another Bullshit Night in Suck City ?is one of the best books I've read in years—a heartbreaking, searing story—the perfect memoir. Nick Flynn hurls himself toward the blunt trauma of history, toward his fear of what he himself might become. It is a story of self-discovery in the best sense, and also a story of the dissembling of history, the fight to keep oneself whole, and the inherent obligations of biology.

Vendela Vida
Flynn's talents are considerable -- he has a compelling voice and a wry sense of humor, especially about himself. He avoids the pitfalls that come with his subject matter: when writing about his recovery from alcohol and drug addiction, he keeps therapy-speak at bay; when describing his work at the shelter, he's utterly unsanctimonious.
— The New York Times
Michael Mewshaw
Although in synopsis the story may sound depressing, the prose swirls in graceful arcs that frequently rise to the level of poetry, leavened by mordant humor.
— The Washington Post
Publishers Weekly
Flynn's wayward father, a self-styled writer and ex-con, describes his life on Boston's streets as "another bullshit night in Suck City": he hangs out in ATM lobbies, stuffs his coat with newspaper and is often "still drunk from the night before." This biting memoir describes the years poet Flynn (Some Ether; Blind Huber) spent, in his late 20s, working at one of the city's homeless shelters, where his path crisscrossed with his down-and-out father's. In examining their troublesome relationship, Flynn admits to feeling lost, as he turned to alcohol and came close to being on the other side of the shelter admissions booth himself. Punchy language and short chapters make what could otherwise be excessively painful more palatable (e.g., "Fact: In 1839 Dostoyevsky witnessed a mob of peasants attacking his father.... they poured vodka down his throat until he died. Fact: I can watch my father pouring vodka down his own throat any day of the week. My role is to play the son, though I often feel like a mob of peasants"). Although it's depressing, the book never seems hopeless, because readers know the author has succeeded at doing what his father only pretended to do: write, and write well. Agent, Bill Clegg. (Sept.) Forecast: Norton has high hopes for this memoir; they promoted it heavily at BEA and have planned an author tour. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Winner of Guggenheim and Witter Bynner fellowships, poet Flynn (Blind Huber) here offers a memoir that is likely one of the best books you will read in 2004. This nonfiction account weaves back and forth between Flynn's childhood in Scituate, MA, and his time working as a caseworker at the Pine Street Inn homeless shelter in Boston. The narrative moves between these worlds until they collide, and we join Flynn in the present for the final chapters. The memoir addresses Flynn's difficult relationships with his parents his mother committed suicide when Flynn was in college, and his distant father still lives in Boston (as of 2003) and his journey to survive them and, at times, himself. Hilarious and heartbreaking by turns, it has been compared to Conroy's Stop-Time and David Eggers's A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius but is really in a class by itself. Highly recommended for public and academic libraries and essential for libraries supporting a literature program. [See Prepub Alert, LJ 5/15/04.] Felicity D. Walsh, Southern Polytechnic State Univ., Marietta, GA Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
A noir family history told in small ladlings-perhaps all the reader may want to absorb at one time, or all the talented Flynn (Some Ether, 2000) can pour at a sitting. His mother left her husband when the author was four years old. In a snapshot taken in the early 1960s, "I crawl toward my father's face as we lay on the grass. . . . The father as ship, as vessel, holding the child afloat. But there was a parallel father as well-the drunk, the con, the paranoid. The father as ship, but taking on water, going down." Flynn didn't see his father again for 24 years. In the interval, his mother committed suicide after hovering "in the realm of vapor and shade," though not before her son had embarked on his drinking career: "By the time Saigon falls I'm drinking whatever liquor I can get my hands on." He's 15. When Dad finally gives him a call, they are both wrecks: the elder an alcoholic ex-con living flop to flop, rifling garbage cans, still making stabs at writing, but more concerned with how to stay dry on a rainy night; the younger a doper, part-time drug-runner, working in a homeless shelter, adrift on a "sea of forgetfulness." While the author ever so slowly, with lots of swings, gathers himself, his father takes to driving a taxi, more for scoping out sleeping venues than collecting fares. Flynn drives the homeless shelter van at night, each bundle a push-pull chance to encounter his father. The voice here is boiled just right: tough, articulate, mindful, without self-pity. There will be little bonding, and any knitting up of the ragged sleeve will have to wait for another time and plane. This is "the book that somehow fell to me, the son, to write," states the author, describing himselfas "my father's uncredited, non-compliant ghostwriter." So give credit now, where it is well due. Author tour. Agent: Bill Clegg
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780393329407
  • Publisher: Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
  • Publication date: 9/19/2005
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 288
  • Sales rank: 87,289
  • Product dimensions: 5.60 (w) x 8.30 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Nick Flynn is the author of Another Bullshit Night in Suck City, winner of the PEN/Martha Albrand Award, and The Ticking Is the Bomb. He divides his time between Houston and Brooklyn.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 24 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(13)

4 Star

(6)

3 Star

(3)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 24 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 24, 2006

    Suck City Not Bulletproof, But Worth the Trip

    In SUCK CITY, Nick Flynn enters a world most of us are content walking past with the drop of a quarter into a cup. This is the world of desperation, of addiction, illness, and despair, the world of Jonathan Flynn, a father whom Nick knows little about. Using obvious narrative skill and free-flowing prose, the story moves between an instropection of and a documentary on Nick's life and its bizarre criss-crossings with his downward-spiral father. Though, clearly, introspection is the stronger attribute, and in this sense Suck City does show a chink in its armor: While Nick takes great pains in recounting Jonathan's life, the details of his own life remain somewhat obscure. His relationship with longtime girlfriend Emily is understated and peripheral, while others (his Pine Street friends, his brother) move in and out of his life at random, leaving us at times to wonder who Nick is, what impact his parents have had on feeling for others. While this book can be bolstered in some places and trimmed elsewhere, Nick achieves an impressive feat nonetheless. He introduces us to Jonathan Flynn, a figure of deceit, an alcoholic, a deadbeat dad and beatdown poet, and shows him for what he truly is: a human being. In turn, Jonathan gives voice to thousands of other human beings who lie at our feet in Suck Cities across the country, revealing their story (or one variation) at last. For this, the read is well worthwhile.

    7 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 22, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Searing, emotional and stunning; this story could be anyone's st

    Searing, emotional and stunning; this story could be anyone's story. In
    a rare gift the movie adaptation; Being Flynn is just as excellent as
    this book which it is drawn from. Flynn writes at times in poetry style
    about his smart yet delusional father who came in and out of his life.
    His mother who did her best raising 2 boys and ultimately committed
    suicide. It's a story we really never want to talk about here in
    America where everything is always so wonderful. Yet, until we no
    longer have people struggling with depression, living on the streets or
    in shelters and spiraling downward; we will always come up short of
    being great. This story reminds us of what is necessary as human beings
    and that is to be mindful of how we are all are broken in some way.
    It's also our responsibility to help each other with our greatest gift
    of all; compassion. This story only heightened my compassionate nature,
    made me tear-up at times and made me want to simply embrace Nick Flynn
    and wish him well. It's simply unforgettable and changed me forever.
    Thank you.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 11, 2011

    Great read

    Highly enjoyed

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 30, 2013

    Boring in spots

    Am still reading this book but am almost done. It's a little jerky and jumps back and forth and repeats a lot. Over, it's an ok read. Kind of gives you a insight into the homeless and how they live.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 25, 2012

    A

    Very good read.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 3, 2012

    Compelling memoir! Looking forward to the film starring Robert DeNiro and Paul Dano

    I found this memoir about the writer's homeless, alchoholic father very compelling. Since he's a poet it's written in a style a bit out of the box but i ultimately enjoyed it. I must admit "enjoyed" is a funny word for a book about such a troubling subject !!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2010

    Great Read!

    This has been one of the most inspirational books I've read in months! This books isn't necessarily happy, but it made sense to me.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 24, 2008

    For anyone who's ever doubted their grip on reality

    Poet Nick Flynn crafts an unflinching portrait of self- doubt in his debut memoir, the story of his accidental relationship with his absentee father. After a misspent youth of making do with substitutes¿other questionable men his mother takes in¿Flynn¿s encounters with his father begin in his 20s while working in a homeless shelter. Now 40, the author braids his past with his father¿s, based on personal observation and the memories of others. The elder Flynn, a poet himself, has spent his life nurturing but one thing, a belief he will write the Great American Novel, even as he descends into alcoholism and homelessness. Set in and around Boston, the story invokes the drama of the sea, Moby Dick and Noah¿s ark without hyperbole, successfully blurring the line between fact and fantasy, a mirror of Flynn¿s reality. Done without hyperbole, even his mother¿s suicide is described bluntly as a ¿palmfull of pills, a gunshot wound, a splintered chair. A nightgown left heavy with blood.¿ Despite the evidence it won¿t end well, Flynn turns to drugs and drinking whenever possible. He drops out of school and skitters on the verge of homelessness himself, living on board a ship for a time. When redemption does come he resists the urge to offer up easy answers, instead pulling aside the thin veil that separates he and his father. Rather than label the man¿s painful existence as insanity, something to dismiss, he says, ¿he is constructed entirely of the stories he tells, like the scaffolding around a building still unbuilt.¿ This tale, by contrast, is pitch perfect.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 22, 2006

    Waaaaay out and very good

    I can't but echo what so many other reviewers have said in praising Nick Flynn's account of working with the homeless, including his own father from whom he had been separated from early infancy, and with dealing with the impact of his mother's suicide. A unique contribution to our understanding of what it means to be down and out in contemporary America. But I can tell you that it¿s one heck of a book all-round, the same way McCrae's 'Katzenjammer'is with its downtrodden theme of being abused and taken advantage. I highly recommend this one.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2005

    An honest and fascinating book

    Most men reading this book will not have a father like Nick's but we can all recognize the difficult relationships that can exist. This book was honest and forthright and interesting. You can't ask for more. Also, you learn a lot about the homeless and the underside of Boston.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 20, 2004

    Non-fiction written like it's the opposite

    I loved this book. I'm normally a very dedicated fiction reader, but this book grabbed me. From the title, to seeing Flynn on the Dennis Miller show, I decided it sounded like an interesting enough TRUE story for me to read. Flynn writes pretty much in the same minimalistic fashion as Palahniuk, Clevenger, and Baer, where the only punctuation is periods and commas, but the story isn't hinged upon perfect prose. If, however, you are a literary snob, you might want to put this down and go re-read Michael Chabon's latest. Flynn tells an interesting story like he would if he were talking right to your face, and manages to get across what he needs to without being too sentimental. A couple times I was sure it was fiction, but only because of my overwhelming enjoyment.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 3, 2004

    A beautiful weaving of literature and poetry.

    This is simply the best book that I've ever read. Perhaps biased by having grown up in the same town at the same time, a fact that allows his imagery to truly come alive for me, I was also blown away by the way every line is so delicately, perfectly constructed. Self depricating without being pitiful, saintly without expecting, or I imagine even accepting recognition, Flynn tells his hugely emotional life story as if it was that of the average Joe. I learned about myself, about my city, and about the world through his eyes. I sincerely hope that he writes more, and soon.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 14, 2004

    Outstanding

    Nick Flynn has written, arguably, the best memoir of the year. Do not be turned away by the hipster title: this book carries weight, while the narrative is punchy and jarring, the prose soars, weightless and atmostpheric. There is a sublimity to the language, and the story he tells with it, that Flynn can call his own. This is not a confessional. It is a radical aporia of a text, bearing witness to the true and often terrifying relationship to the father. Please buy this book and read it, and then give it to many others.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 27, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 24, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 28, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 7, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 15, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 24 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)