Another Turn of the Crank: Essays

Another Turn of the Crank: Essays

by Wendell Berry
     
 

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Wendell Berry proposes, and earnestly hopes, that people will learn once more to care for their local communities, and so begin a restoration that might spread over our entire nation and beyond. The renewed development of local economies would help preserve rural diversity despite the burgeoning global economy that threatens to homogenize and compromise… See more details below

Overview


Wendell Berry proposes, and earnestly hopes, that people will learn once more to care for their local communities, and so begin a restoration that might spread over our entire nation and beyond. The renewed development of local economies would help preserve rural diversity despite the burgeoning global economy that threatens to homogenize and compromise communities all over the world.

From modern health care to the practice of forestry, from local focus to national resolve, Berry argues, there can never be a separation between global ecosystems and human communities—the two are intricately connected, and the health and survival of one depends upon the other.

Provocative, intimate, and thoughtful, Another Turn of the Crank reaches to the heart of Berry’s concern and vision for the future, for America and for the world.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Berry, a novelist, poet and essayist (What Are People For?), focuses here on the importance of small communities in this latest collection of thought-provoking pieces. The decline of agriculture, according to Berry, was brought about by corporations that induced farmers to rely on technology and artificial fertilizers, which destroyed topsoil and produced tainted crops. Berry believes small farmers should grow food primarily for the local population, without using fossil fuels or chemicals. In another article, he argues against abortion and for a sexuality related to fertility rather than to individual gratification. His closing essay, on modern health care, deals with the tendency of the medical establishment to view a patient as a machine that can be cured by technology rather than as a human being who must be healed by love as well as medical treatment. (Nov.)
Library Journal
Like Berry's previous books (What Are People For?, LJ 4/1/90), this wonderful new collection of essays concerns the order and harmony of the earth and its inhabitants. Here Berry focuses on the importance of local communities, arguing that "modern national and global economies have been formed in almost perfect disregard of community and ecological interests." Absentee owners have proven to be greedy and destructive. Similarly, a reliance on chemical technologies or the preservation of wild areas within otherwise exploited lands offers no solutions. Only local communities can provide the affection, care, and understanding essential to maintaining the wilderness. Berry offers an array of ways in which communities can become more self-sufficient and healthy, such as by supplying local needs primarily from local sources. Written with passion and conviction, this thoughtful book deserves to be widely read.-Ilse Heidmann, Kyle Community Lib., Tex.
Ray Olson
Berry entitles his slim new book of essays with self-deflating ambivalence. Since he exhorts us again on his familiar themes--the necessity to democracy of rural communities and independent local economies; the inextricability of human from natural relationships; the importance of public property conceived and treated as "common wealth"; the bane that lies in confusing the organic with the mechanical, as in conceiving the body as a machine, the mind as a computer; etc.--he seems to think he risks appearing a repetitious crank, stubbornly trying to crank the engine of humane reform to life. He needn't have worried. He remains one of the most lucid writers on the most basic matters--growing food, living on earth, relating to other persons and creatures, the love enjoined by religion. He refuses to lapse into the furious jeremiad that the continuing decline of American agriculture as a way of living seems to mandate. Instead he is patient and sensible, hopeful that there is a loving wisdom to which humanity will turn and, as the Shaker hymn says, "come round right."

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781582438429
Publisher:
Counterpoint Press
Publication date:
07/01/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
112
File size:
0 MB

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