Another Way to Go

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - David McGee
Radney Foster has built a career on reliably delivering soaring melodies, memorable hooks, infectious grooves, and passionate and timely lyrics. On Another Way to Go, his first studio album in four years, he affirms his legacy and in fact bumps up his strengths a few notches with his most penetrating batch of original songs yet. The sturdy, thumping rhythms powering "Everyday Angel" prove perfect for his poignant studies of common folk doing good deeds -- the somber final verse about a firefighter who answered the World Trade Center alarm and never returned is at once thoughtful and triumphant, ranking among the best 9/11 tributes. Never too far from rock in anything he ...
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September 10, 2002 CD New in very good packaging. Originally released: 2002. Ships daily. New CD, Shrink-wrapped, case and artwork are in excellent condition. Hole punched in ... back of case Read more Show Less

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Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - David McGee
Radney Foster has built a career on reliably delivering soaring melodies, memorable hooks, infectious grooves, and passionate and timely lyrics. On Another Way to Go, his first studio album in four years, he affirms his legacy and in fact bumps up his strengths a few notches with his most penetrating batch of original songs yet. The sturdy, thumping rhythms powering "Everyday Angel" prove perfect for his poignant studies of common folk doing good deeds -- the somber final verse about a firefighter who answered the World Trade Center alarm and never returned is at once thoughtful and triumphant, ranking among the best 9/11 tributes. Never too far from rock in anything he does, Foster kicks out the jams on "Tired of Pretending," a ferocious, Steve Earle-like diatribe, and channels the Rolling Stones on the rowdy roadhouse rocker "What It Is That You Do," marked by serpentine guitar commentaries and some bold sax honking. And when it comes to speaking to the moment, Foster delivers one big beauty on "Scary Old World," co-written with the late Harlan Howard, a languid, traditional country meditation on love as salvation in the midst of ongoing horrors. Chely Wright pitches in with a tender, bracing vocal, and the song ends up feeling like the soothing balm it surely was meant to be. It was one of Howard's last songs, and a more fitting finish to a towering career one couldn't imagine.
All Music Guide - Robert L. Doerschuk
Backed by a band of Nashville stalwarts, Foster ends a four-year studio layoff with this set. There's nearly as much R&B as country here, with echoes of Van Morrison in the full organ chords, soulful guitar licks, and idiomatic chord progressions; all this, along with certain aspects of Foster's timbre, nods toward Moondance on "Again" and "Sure Feels Right," and especially in the sax harmonies of "What It Is That You Do." References to the Twin Towers disaster were practically mandatory in 2002, and Foster delivers his on "Everyday Angel," though by restricting it to the last verse he emphasizes that goodness needn't wait for tragedy to come knocking. Less-specific references to timely terrors crop up in "Scary Old World," whose rugged eloquence betrays the influence of co-writer Harlan Howard. The rest of the album generally shuffles through the heartbreak deck and comes up with a good but less-than-unbeatable hand. "If love is what you want, I got what you need," Foster declaims on "I Got What You Need," as if this line could actually get results. Three tracks do break from the norm: "Tired of Pretending," which argues that pretense is bad; "What Are We Doing Here Tonight," whose rhetorical structure follows a similar theme in a more thoughtful way at least until the anticlimactic admission, "I guess what I'm saying is, I really like your style"; and "Just Sit Still," a rumination on the virtues of slowing down, taking a deep breath, and not getting upset over money, traffic jams, pop album reviews, and other nitpickeries.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 9/10/2002
  • Label: Dualtone Music Group
  • UPC: 803020112827
  • Catalog Number: 1128

Album Credits

Performance Credits
Radney Foster Primary Artist, Acoustic Guitar, Electric Guitar, Background Vocals
Barbara Lamb Fiddle
John Catchings Cello
Tony Harrell Piano, Accordion, Hammond Organ, Wurlitzer
Jim Hoke Saxophone
Mike McAdam Electric Guitar, Slide Guitar
Larry Paxton Bass, Upright Bass
Kim Richey Background Vocals
Chely Wright Vocals
Craig Duncan and the Smoky Mountain Band Hammered Dulcimer
Chris Thile Mandolin
Andy Thompson Electric Guitar, Background Vocals
Pete Finney Steel Guitar
Matt Thompson Percussion, Drums, Background Vocals
Joe Pisapia Electric Guitar
Melinda Doolittle Background Vocals
Georgia Middleman Background Vocals
Casey Wood Percussion
James Paulich Background Vocals
Christy Hathcock Background Vocals
Technical Credits
Radney Foster Producer, Engineer
Darrell Brown Vocal Arrangements
Dave Collins Mastering
Chuck Linder Engineer
King Williams Engineer
Casey Wood Engineer
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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Sophisticated country with soul and powerpop flavors

    Having split up their act, Foster & Lloyd, each partner has produced albums that have slowly found their way back to the rock-oriented pop sounds that was the duo's stock-in-trade. Lloyd's solo releases, including 1999's "Standing on the Shoulder of Giants" found him moving into full-fledged power-pop, while Foster's solo work initially leaned towards country and acoustic. ¶ Foster's earliest solo albums, "Del Rio, Texas, 1959" and "Labor of Love," strived to differentiate his solo work from that of his previous partnership, but starting with 1999's "See What You Want to See," and continuing even more resolutely on this latest release, Foster has once again merges his country twang with a more electric, adult-contemporary sound. The album's lead-off track, "Real Fine Place to Start," smoothly mixes a wall of electric and acoustic guitars with careening steel, mandolin, sharp-edged drum fills and chiming vocal harmonies. It's a brilliant mix of country twang and powerpop jangle. ¶ The opening track's power is maintained without having to continually repeat the powerpop instrumentation. Rock gives way to soul, acoustic country, and nearly spoken passages that catch the listener's attention. Foster's lyrical canon, drained by divorce and a bitter custody battle, has been refilled with personal songs of love, struggle and renewal. His co-write with Harlan Howard, "Scary Old World," co-sung with Chely Wright, and cut the day after Howard's passing, contrasts the uncertainty of today's chaotic world with the certainty and empowering nature of close relationships. The title track's message of personal freedom is a fitting closer for Foster's first studio effort on the indie Dualtone label. ¶ The combination of musical and lyrical vision forms a sophisticated equation wrought by a maturing artist. Foster's songs still have hit single hooks, but his lyrics tell the sort of fully-formed stories often missing in the emotionally stunted world of commercial radio.

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