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Anthem

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Overview

Equality 7-2521, citizen of the future, pits himself against the state.

This expanded edition of Ayn Rand's classic tale of a future dark age of the great "We"--in which individuals have no name, no independence, and no values--is a beautifully written, powerful novel that projects current social trends into the future, and anticipates such later Rand masterpieces as The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged.

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Anthem

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Overview

Equality 7-2521, citizen of the future, pits himself against the state.

This expanded edition of Ayn Rand's classic tale of a future dark age of the great "We"--in which individuals have no name, no independence, and no values--is a beautifully written, powerful novel that projects current social trends into the future, and anticipates such later Rand masterpieces as The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
The difference between this long-forgotten exercise in paranoia and other futuristic visions of a world controlled by the state, such as Aldous Huxley's or George Orwell's, is the extremist tone of Rand's story. The author lived in a black-and-white world in which things social or communal are evil and things individual and selfish are exalted. This "anthem" culminates in a hymn to the concepts of "I" and "ego," where the rebels are those who resist group action; the oppressors are government officials and others who attempt to provide a safety net for the less fortunate. The production is not improved by the theatricality of narrator Paul Meier, which is reminiscent of a ham Victorian actor intoning an overwrought melodrama. Not recommended.-Mark Pumphrey, Polk Cty. P.L., Columbus, NC
Fact Forum News

"In her usage of the English language she combines clarity of expression with prose of poetic grace. Here, indeed, is an anthem-an anthem, not in the idiom of music, but in the more difficult medium of words alone. This is the most beautiful, the most inspiring novel this reviewer has ever read. It is an ethical and philosophical rather than a religious dedication to freedom and the individual."—Joan DeArmond, Fact Forum News

— Joan DeArmond

Fact Forum News - Joan DeArmond

"In her usage of the English language she combines clarity of expression with prose of poetic grace. Here, indeed, is an anthem-an anthem, not in the idiom of music, but in the more difficult medium of words alone. This is the most beautiful, the most inspiring novel this reviewer has ever read. It is an ethical and philosophical rather than a religious dedication to freedom and the individual."—Joan DeArmond, Fact Forum News
All-American Books

"Reading this inspired little story is a rewarding and satisfying experience which no American should deny himself."—All-American Books
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780812415094
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 3/28/1996
  • Edition number: 50
  • Sales rank: 830,376
  • Product dimensions: 4.20 (w) x 6.80 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Ayn Rand

(1905-1982)

Born Alissa Zinovievna Rosenbaum, she was best known for her philosophy of Objectivism and her novels We the Living, Anthem, The Fountainhead, and Atlas Shrugged.

Biography

Ayn Rand was born in St. Petersburg, Russia, on February 2, 1905. At age six she taught herself to read and two years later discovered her first fictional hero in a French magazine for children, thus capturing the heroic vision that sustained her throughout her life. At the age of nine she decided to make fiction writing her career. Thoroughly opposed to the mysticism and collectivism of Russian culture, she thought of herself as a European writer, especially after encountering authors such as Walter Scott and—in 1918—Victor Hugo, the writer she most admired.

During her high school years, she was eyewitness to both the Kerensky Revolution, which she supported, and—in 1917—the Bolshevik Revolution, which she denounced from the outset. In order to escape the fighting, her family went to the Crimea, where she finished high school. The final Communist victory brought the confiscation of her father's pharmacy and periods of near-starvation. When introduced to American history in her last year of high school, she immediately took America as her model of what a nation of free men could be.

When her family returned from the Crimea, she entered the University of Petrograd to study philosophy and history. Graduating in 1924, she experienced the disintegration of free inquiry and the takeover of the university by communist thugs. Amidst the increasingly gray life, her one great pleasure was Western films and plays. Long a movie fan, she entered the State Institute for Cinema Arts in 1924 to study screen writing.

In late 1925 she obtained permission to leave Soviet Russia for a visit to relatives in the United States. Although she told Soviet authorities that her visit would be short, she was determined never to return to Russia. She arrived in New York City in February 1926. She spent the next six months with her relatives in Chicago, obtained an extension to her visa, and then left for Hollywood to pursue a career as a screenwriter.

On Ayn Rand's second day in Hollywood, Cecil B. DeMille saw her standing at the gate of his studio, offered her a ride to the set of his movie The King of Kings, and gave her a job, first as an extra, then as a script reader. During the next week at the studio, she met an actor, Frank O'Connor, whom she married in 1929; they were married until his death fifty years later.

After struggling for several years at various non-writing jobs, including one in the wardrobe department at the RKO Corporation, she sold her first screenplay, Red Pawn to Universal Studios in 1932 and saw her first stage play, Night of January 16th, produced in Hollywood and then on Broadway. Her first novel, We the Living, was completed in 1933 but was rejected by publishers for years, until The Macmillan Company in the United States and Cassells and Company in England published the book in 1936. The most autobiographical of her novels—it was based on her years under Soviet tyranny—We the Living was not well-received by American intellectuals and reviewers. Ayn Rand was up against the pro-communism dominating the culture during "the Red Decade."

She began writing The Fountainhead in 1935. In the character of the architect Howard Roark, she presented for the first time the kind of hero whose depiction was the chief goal of her writing: the ideal man, man as "he could be and ought to be." The Fountainhead was rejected by twelve publishers but finally accepted by the Bobbs-Merrill Company. When published in 1943, it made history by becoming a best seller through word-of-mouth two years later, and gained for its author lasting recognition as a champion of individualism.

Ayn Rand returned to Hollywood in late 1943 to write the screenplay for The Fountainhead, but wartime restrictions delayed production until 1948. Working part time as a screenwriter for Hal Wallis Productions, she began her major novel, Atlas Shrugged, in 1946. In 1951 she moved back to New York City and devoted herself full time to the completion of Atlas Shrugged.

Published in 1957, Atlas Shrugged was her greatest achievement and last work of fiction. In this novel she dramatized her unique philosophy in an intellectual mystery story that integrated ethics, metaphysics, epistemology, politics, economics and sex. Although she considered herself primarily a fiction writer, she realized that in order to create heroic fictional characters, she had to identify the philosophic principles that make such individuals possible. She needed to formulate "a philosophy for living on earth."

Thereafter, Ayn Rand wrote and lectured on her philosophy—Objectivism. She published and edited her own periodicals from 1962 to 1976, her essays providing much of the material for nine books on Objectivism and its application to the culture. Ayn Rand died on March 6, 1982, in her New York City apartment.

Every book by Ayn Rand published in her lifetime is still in print, and hundreds of thousands of copies are sold each year, so far totaling more than twenty million. Several new volumes have been published posthumously. Her vision of man and her philosophy for living on earth have changed the lives of thousands of readers and launched a philosophic movement with a growing impact on American culture.

Author biography courtesy of The Ayn Rand Institute.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Alice Rosenbaum (real name)
    1. Date of Birth:
      February 2, 1905
    2. Place of Birth:
      St. Petersburg, Russia
    1. Date of Death:
      March 6, 1982
    2. Place of Death:
      New York, New York

Read an Excerpt

Anthem


By Ayn Rand

OPEN ROAD INTEGRATED MEDIA

Copyright © 2014 Open Road Integrated Media, Inc.
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-4804-7699-8


CHAPTER 1

It is a sin to write this. It is a sin to think words no others think and to put them down upon a paper no others are to see. It is base and evil. It is as if we were speaking alone to no ears but our own. And we know well that there is no transgression blacker than to do or think alone. We have broken the laws. The laws say that men may not write unless the Council of Vocations bid them so. May we be forgiven!

But this is not the only sin upon us. We have committed a greater crime, and for this crime there is no name. What punishment awaits us if it be discovered we know not, for no such crime has come in the memory of men and there are no laws to provide for it.

It is dark here. The flame of the candle stands still in the air. Nothing moves in this tunnel save our hand on the paper. We are alone here under the earth. It is a fearful word, alone. The laws say that none among men may be alone, ever and at any time, for this is the great transgression and the root of all evil. But we have broken many laws. And now there is nothing here save our one body, and it is strange to see only two legs stretched on the ground, and on the wall before us the shadow of our one head.

The walls are cracked and water runs upon them in thin threads without sound, black and glistening as blood. We stole the candle from the larder of the Home of the Street Sweepers. We shall be sentenced to ten years in the Palace of Corrective Detention if it be discovered. But this matters not. It matters only that the light is precious and we should not waste it to write when we need it for that work which is our crime. Nothing matters save the work, our secret, our evil, our precious work. Still, we must also write, for—may the Council have mercy upon us!—we wish to speak for once to no ears but our own.

Our name is Equality 7-2521, as it is written on the iron bracelet which all men wear on their left wrists with their names upon it. We are twenty-one years old. We are six feet tall, and this is a burden, for there are not many men who are six feet tall. Ever have the Teachers and the Leaders pointed to us and frowned and said:

"There is evil in your bones, Equality 7-2521, for your body has grown beyond the bodies of your brothers." But we cannot change our bones nor our body.

We were born with a curse. It has always driven us to thoughts which are forbidden. It has always given us wishes which men may not wish. We know that we are evil, but there is no will in us and no power to resist it. This is our wonder and our secret fear, that we know and do not resist.

We strive to be like all our brother men, for all men must be alike. Over the portals of the Palace of the World Council, there are words cut in the marble, which we repeat to ourselves whenever we are tempted:

"WE ARE ONE IN ALL AND ALL IN ONE. THERE ARE NO MEN BUT ONLY THE GREAT WE, ONE, INDIVISIBLE AND FOREVER."


We repeat this to ourselves, but it helps us not.

These words were cut long ago. There is green mould in the grooves of the letters and yellow streaks on the marble, which come from more years than men could count. And these words are the truth, for they are written on the Palace of the World Council, and the World Council is the body of all truth. Thus has it been ever since the Great Rebirth, and farther back than that no memory can reach.

But we must never speak of the times before the Great Rebirth, else we are sentenced to three years in the Palace of Corrective Detention. It is only the Old Ones who whisper about it in the evenings, in the Home of the Useless. They whisper many strange things, of the towers which rose to the sky, in those Unmentionable Times, and of the wagons which moved without horses, and of the lights which burned without flame. But those times were evil. And those times passed away, when men saw the Great Truth which is this: that all men are one and that there is no will save the will of all men together.

All men are good and wise. It is only we, Equality 7-2521, we alone who were born with a curse. For we are not like our brothers. And as we look back upon our life, we see that it has ever been thus and that it has brought us step by step to our last, supreme transgression, our crime of crimes hidden here under the ground.

We remember the Home of the Infants where we lived till we were five years old, together with all the children of the City who had been born in the same year. The sleeping halls there were white and clean and bare of all things save one hundred beds. We were just like all our brothers then, save for the one transgression: we fought with our brothers. There are few offenses blacker than to fight with our brothers, at any age and for any cause whatsoever. The Council of the Home told us so, and of all the children of that year, we were locked in the cellar most often.

When we were five years old, we were sent to the Home of the Students, where there are ten wards, for our ten years of learning. Men must learn till they reach their fifteenth year. Then they go to work. In the Home of the Students we arose when the big bell rang in the tower and we went to our beds when it rang again. Before we removed our garments, we stood in the great sleeping hall, and we raised our right arms, and we said all together with the three Teachers at the head:

"We are nothing. Mankind is all. By the grace of our brothers are we allowed our lives. We exist through, by and for our brothers who are the State. Amen."

Then we slept. The sleeping halls were white and clean and bare of all things save one hundred beds.

We, Equality 7-2521, were not happy in those years in the Home of the Students. It was not that the learning was too hard for us. It was that the learning was too easy. This is a great sin, to be born with a head which is too quick. It is not good to be different from our brothers, but it is evil to be superior to them. The Teachers told us so, and they frowned when they looked upon us.

So we fought against this curse. We tried to forget our lessons, but we always remembered. We tried not to understand what the Teachers taught, but we always understood it before the Teachers had spoken. We looked upon Union 53992, who were a pale boy with only half a brain, and we tried to say and do as they did, that we might be like them, like Union 5-3992, but somehow the Teachers knew that we were not. And we were lashed more often than all the other children.

The Teachers were just, for they had been appointed by the Councils, and the Councils are the voice of all justice, for they are the voice of all men. And if sometimes, in the secret darkness of our heart, we regret that which befell us on our fifteenth birthday, we know that it was through our own guilt. We had broken a law, for we had not paid heed to the words of our Teachers. The Teachers had said to us all:

"Dare not choose in your minds the work you would like to do when you leave the Home of the Students. You shall do that which the Council of Vocations shall prescribe for you. For the Council of Vocations knows in its great wisdom where you are needed by your brother men, better than you can know it in your unworthy little minds. And if you are not needed by your brother man, there is no reason for you to burden the earth with your bodies."

We knew this well, in the years of our childhood, but our curse broke our will. We were guilty and we confess it here: we were guilty of the great Transgression of Preference. We preferred some work and some lessons to the others. We did not listen well to the history of all the Councils elected since the Great Rebirth. But we loved the Science of Things. We wished to know. We wished to know about all the things which make the earth around us. We asked so many questions that the Teachers forbade it.

We think that there are mysteries in the sky and under the water and in the plants which grow. But the Council of Scholars has said that there are no mysteries, and the Council of Scholars knows all things. And we learned much from our Teachers. We learned that the earth is flat and that the sun revolves around it, which causes the day and the night. We learned the names of all the winds which blow over the seas and push the sails of our great ships. We learned how to bleed men to cure them of all ailments.

We loved the Science of Things. And in the darkness, in the secret hour, when we awoke in the night and there were no brothers around us, but only their shapes in the beds and their snores, we closed our eyes, and we held our lips shut, and we stopped our breath, that no shudder might let our brothers see or hear or guess, and we thought that we wished to be sent to the Home of the Scholars when our time would come.

All the great modern inventions come from the Home of the Scholars, such as the newest one, which was found only a hundred years ago, of how to make candles from wax and string; also, how to make glass, which is put in our windows to protect us from the rain. To find these things, the Scholars must study the earth and learn from the rivers, from the sands, from the winds and the rocks. And if we went to the Home of the Scholars, we could learn from these also. We could ask questions of these, for they do not forbid questions.

And questions give us no rest. We know not why our curse makes us seek we know not what, ever and ever. But we cannot resist it. It whispers to us that there are great things on this earth of ours, and that we can know them if we try, and that we must know them. We ask, why must we know, but it has no answer to give us. We must know that we may know.

So we wished to be sent to the Home of the Scholars. We wished it so much that our hands trembled under the blankets in the night, and we bit our arm to stop that other pain which we could not endure. It was evil and we dared not face our brothers in the morning. For men may wish nothing for themselves. And we were punished when the Council of Vocations came to give us our life Mandates which tell those who reach their fifteenth year what their work is to be for the rest of their days.

The Council of Vocations came on the first day of spring, and they sat in the great hall. And we who were fifteen and all the Teachers came into the great hall. And the Council of Vocations sat on a high dais, and they had but two words to speak to each of the Students. They called the Students' names, and when the Students stepped before them, one after another, the Council said: "Carpenter" or "Doctor" or "Cook" or "Leader." Then each Student raised their right arm and said: "The will of our brothers be done."

Now if the Council has said "Carpenter" or "Cook," the Students so assigned go to work and they do not study any further. But if the Council has said "Leader," then those Students go into the Home of the Leaders, which is the greatest house in the City, for it has three stories. And there they study for many years, so that they may become candidates and be elected to the City Council and the State Council and the World Council—by a free and general vote of all men. But we wished not to be a Leader, even though it is a great honor. We wished to be a Scholar.

So we awaited our turn in the great hall and then we heard the Council of Vocations call our name: "Equality 7-2521." We walked to the dais, and our legs did not tremble, and we looked up at the Council. There were five members of the Council, three of the male gender and two of the female. Their hair was white and their faces were cracked as the clay of a dry river bed. They were old. They seemed older than the marble of the Temple of the World Council. They sat before us and they did not move. And we saw no breath to stir the folds of their white togas. But we knew that they were alive, for a finger of the hand of the oldest rose, pointed to us, and fell down again. This was the only thing which moved, for the lips of the oldest did not move as they said: "Street Sweeper."

We felt the cords of our neck grow tight as our head rose higher to look upon the faces of the Council, and we were happy. We knew we had been guilty, but now we had a way to atone for it. We would accept our Life Mandate, and we would work for our brothers, gladly and willingly, and we would erase our sin against them, which they did not know, but we knew. So we were happy, and proud of ourselves and of our victory over ourselves. We raised our right arm and we spoke, and our voice was the clearest, the steadiest voice in the hall that day, and we said:

"The will of our brothers be done."

And we looked straight into the eyes of the Council, but their eyes were as cold blue glass buttons.

So we went into the Home of the Street Sweepers. It is a grey house on a narrow street. There is a sundial in its courtyard, by which the Council of the Home can tell the hours of the day and when to ring the bell. When the bell rings, we all arise from our beds. The sky is green and cold in our windows to the east. The shadow on the sundial marks off a half-hour while we dress and eat our breakfast in the dining hall, where there are five long tables with twenty clay plates and twenty clay cups on each table. Then we go to work in the streets of the City, with our brooms and our rakes. In five hours, when the sun is high, we return to the Home and we eat our midday meal, for which one-half hour is allowed. Then we go to work again. In five hours, the shadows are blue on the pavements, and the sky is blue with a deep brightness which is not bright. We come back to have our dinner, which lasts one hour. Then the bell rings and we walk in a straight column to one of the City Halls, for the Social Meeting. Other columns of men arrive from the Homes of the different Trades. The candles are lit, and the Councils of the different Homes stand in a pulpit, and they speak to us of our duties and of our brother men. Then visiting Leaders mount the pulpit and they read to us the speeches which were made in the City Council that day, for the City Council represents all men and all men must know. Then we sing hymns, the Hymn of Brotherhood, and the Hymn of Equality, and the Hymn of the Collective Spirit. The sky is a soggy purple when we return to the Home. Then the bell rings and we walk in a straight column to the City Theatre for three hours of Social Recreation. There a play is shown upon the stage, with two great choruses from the Home of the Actors, which speak and answer all together, in two great voices. The plays are about toil and how good it is. Then we walk back to the Home in a straight column. The sky is like a black sieve pierced by silver drops that tremble, ready to burst through. The moths beat against the street lanterns. We go to our beds and we sleep, till the bell rings again. The sleeping halls are white and clean and bare of all things save one hundred beds.

Thus have we lived each day of four years, until two springs ago when our crime happened. Thus must all men live until they are forty. At forty, they are worn out. At forty, they are sent to the Home of the Useless, where the Old Ones live. The Old Ones do not work, for the State takes care of them. They sit in the sun in summer and they sit by the fire in winter. They do not speak often, for they are weary. The Old Ones know that they are soon to die. When a miracle happens and some live to be forty-five, they are the Ancient Ones, and the children stare at them when passing by the Home of the Useless. Such is to be our life, as that of all our brothers and of the brothers who came before us.

Such would have been our life, had we not committed our crime which changed all things for us. And it was our curse which drove us to our crime. We had been a good Street Sweeper and like all our brother Street Sweepers, save for our cursed wish to know. We looked too long at the stars at night, and at the trees and the earth. And when we cleaned the yard of the Home of the Scholars, we gathered the glass vials, the pieces of metal, the dried bones which they had discarded. We wished to keep these things and to study them, but we had no place to hide them. So we carried them to the City Cesspool. And then we made the discovery.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from Anthem by Ayn Rand. Copyright © 2014 Open Road Integrated Media, Inc.. Excerpted by permission of OPEN ROAD INTEGRATED MEDIA.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 208 )
Rating Distribution

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(146)

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(36)

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(9)

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(5)

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(12)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 221 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 25, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Oh that Unspeakable Word

    Some people find the society Ayn Rand creates in Anthem to be extreme. That being said, one must consider the perspective of a teenage girl in Soviet Russia whose father's pharmacy was taken by the communist government. The notion that everything belongs to the collective "We" and that one exists solely for the good of the state would surely lead to intense feelings of helplessness, anger, and frustration. Hence, Anthem. Told through the eyes of Equality 7-2521 in a society where there literally is no I in Team, the hero attempts to break from the herd and discover what once was, fueled by the mystery of the Unspeakable Word. An interesting choice for book groups!

    25 out of 31 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2010

    amazing!!!!!!

    ANTHEM is a moving novel that makes you think about everything around you. Ayn Rand shows the reader a completely different world. That doesn't know the word I they only know we and they always think of the greater good. It especially makes you think about your freedoms and rights. Equality 7-2521 is an example of a person without rights or freedom in a world where everyone is equal and a few select people are allowed to think and use their creativity.
    The setting in the novel is in a world where there is no technology. Equality is a street sweeper who isn't allowed to you his intellectual abilities. When cleaning one day Equality finds a tunnel and in this tunnel are a light bulb and a circuit breaker which have electricity. Equality then feels like he has discovered something that the world has never known about. Ayn Rand uses this because it is the privilege in which we take most advantage of and she shows use a world without electricity. Can you imagine a world without electricity? No computer, television, air conditioning, and most importantly no lights. Just like in the novel where they have no lights instead they use candles because in their society lights are banned.
    Another event that changes the story is when Equality and the Golden One (the girl he falls in love with) find the vacant house in the Forbidden Forest. This house is special to the story because it is filled with modern day amenities such as lights, beds, bathrooms, and other things that we take for granted. The largest impact of this house is that she points out the flaws of society and how we have so much that we don't need or even waste. But in the house Equality finds things that are left from the society that we have today and he learns to be able to think and try things and even have ideas of his own.
    When Equality is reading a book in the house he finds a word that he had never heard or seen before and it's the word I. Which to us doesn't seem like much but in a world where there is no "I" and everything is "we" it is a big deal.
    After learning this word he starts to realize its power and how it helps people and life grow, so he decides to start a new life with the Golden One and in this new society everyone will know the power of the word I.

    23 out of 25 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 9, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    WORST BOOK OF ALL TIME!

    If you are looking for a book written by a person who is a complete egoist without a drop of respect for anyone else except for herself, you have definitely found the right book. Being critical about Socialism and Communism, this woman does not even understand what she is criticizing. Being overly biased, extraneously selfish, and disrespectful, she wrote his book as though she was ranting against something completely out of topic. Her witting is not only contradictory, but also very blunt. George Orwell's ANIMAL FARM simply slaughters this book.

    Save your money and buy book by a real author like Dostoevsky, Dickens, Orwell, or Twain who actually discuss real flaws in society.

    9 out of 62 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 13, 2006

    Not very good, in my view...

    Alright, maybe you adored this book. I don't know. But I DO know that I hated it. It was just so slow and it's a short book to begin with, but if all the extra junk was cut out, it would only be half the length it is now. I had to read this for English class and while many others loved it, I despised it. There seemed to be no craft, no full plot, no point, no reality...nothing. I definatly do NOT suggest it to anyone else...

    7 out of 23 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 8, 2013

    This is my favorite book! I love this story and I read it again

    This is my favorite book! I love this story and I read it again from time to time. Rand really covers so much in just 100 pages. I liked it so much that the next book I read was her 1000 page novel "Atlas Shrugged". Another excellent book! Anyone who only gives a one star rating is a flaming commie -- it's as simple as that.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 3, 2008

    Anthem, the worlds greatest book?

    This book is a book that will leave you wanting more.<BR/>You'll read it, and re-read it. And re-read it.<BR/>I recommend you this book, jist to get you thinking or for a thrill of being in somone else's shoes.

    4 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 19, 2006

    worst book ever

    this book is so slow and boring i think i got dumber just by reading it.

    3 out of 19 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 17, 2012

    I had to read this book for my Lit class, and I honestly fell as

    I had to read this book for my Lit class, and I honestly fell asleep during class while reading it. I couldn't stand or get used to the speaker referring to himself as &quot;we&quot; and saying &quot;our&quot; instead of &quot;my.&quot; The book was also painfully slow, and wasn't descriptive. I gave up on the book midway through and read the chapter summaries on Sparknotes for my class instead. This is the first book I've ever read that I could not finish, and I've read books like Hatchet, The Outsiders, and The Grapes of Wrath.

    2 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 9, 2012

    There are a lot of books that people find "boring" or

    There are a lot of books that people find &quot;boring&quot; or &quot;uninteresting&quot;...but the point of a slow book is to uncover an immense theme that makes people feel genuinely amazed at the end. This is one of the most interesting stories witht eh most original plot I've ever encountered and I would read this book 1,000 more times for fun. Though it is slow, the inspiration that this book brought me is something that I've never quite felt or can easily express in words. It just is so uniquely different that there is nothing quite like it, which are the makings of a masterpiece such as this. If you're someone who does not enjoy slow stories and needs action constantly, do us all a favor and save yourself time by not reading it because people like us who can analyze and find the truly inspirational meaning within the book don't want to hear your wining. If you are like me and love calm and excitingly different books that have a lot of defference and excitement then READ THIS ASAP!!! One of my favorites...I wish it didn't end in only about 100 pages.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 7, 2012

    I Also Recommend:

    The Best Quick Read!

    Anthem is a very fast read. It says a lot, in few words, beautifully written.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Be Careful, You Could Get Brainwashed!

    I warn those who read this, not to get brain washed. All it is, is rubbish organized in an 'intelligent' sounding way. This book is absolute garbage. Ayn Rand was a seemingly selfish woman with poorly planned out ideas. I completely disagree with her 'ME ME ME!' mindset. I find her very unsubtle biblical references offending, and mocking. Unfortunately I was forced to read this for school, so I certainly do not recommend it.

    1 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 5, 2009

    Thought provoking.

    Purchased hard cover book to replace a much worn paperback book. Great to get a special anniversary edition!

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 18, 2014

    Spike

    Did i find a new rp

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 9, 2014

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 2, 2014

    Shelby

    Texting my nerds and hw lol

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 6, 2014

    Logan

    Walk in...

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 5, 2014

    Jacob

    K

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 3, 2014

    Shawn

    I have a gf

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 3, 2014

    Shawn

    Walks in flips his cute blond hair and says wazzup

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 3, 2014

    Shawn

    Sits by bella sup .flps hair. You look fine to day .flip.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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