Anthem: Anniversary Edition

Overview

He lived in the dark ages of the future. In a loveless world, he dared to fall in love. In an age that had lost all trace of science and civilization, he had the courage to seek and find knowledge. But these were not the crimes for which he would be hunted. He was marked for death because he had committed the unpardonable sin: standing out from the mindless human herd. Ayn Rand’s classic tale of a dystopian future of the great “We”—a world that deprives individuals of a name or independence—anticipates her ...

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Overview

He lived in the dark ages of the future. In a loveless world, he dared to fall in love. In an age that had lost all trace of science and civilization, he had the courage to seek and find knowledge. But these were not the crimes for which he would be hunted. He was marked for death because he had committed the unpardonable sin: standing out from the mindless human herd. Ayn Rand’s classic tale of a dystopian future of the great “We”—a world that deprives individuals of a name or independence—anticipates her later masterpieces, The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged.
 
This seventy-fifth anniversary edition of Anthem, celebrating the controversial and enduring legacy of its author, features an introduction by Rand’s literary executor, Leonard Piekoff, which includes excerpts from documents by Ayn Rand—letters, interviews, and journal notes in which she discusses Anthem. This volume also includes a complete reproduction of the original British edition with Ayn Rand’s handwritten editorial changes and a Reader’s Guide to her writings and philosophy.

In Ayn Rand’s novels you have found more than great works of art—you have found a philosophy of reason.
 
“I had to originate a philosophical framework of my own, because my basic view of man and of existence was in conflict with most of the existing philosophical theories. In order to define, explain, and present my concept of man, I had to become a philosopher in the specific meaning of the term.”—Ayn Rand
 
Now available for further reading on Rand’s philosophy: Objective Communication by Leonard Piekoff.
 
Ayn Rand’s philosophy of Objectivism is increasingly influencing the shape of the world from business to politics to achieving personal goals. In Objective Communication, Peikoff explains how you can communicate philosophical ideas with conviction, logic, and, most of all, reason.
 
Also available from Penguin: an enhanced edition/app of Atlas Shrugged.

This expanded edition of Ayn Rand's classic tale of a future dark age of the great "We"--in which individuals have no name, no independence, and no values--is a beautifully written, powerful novel that projects current social trends into the future, and anticipates such later Rand masterpieces as The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
The difference between this long-forgotten exercise in paranoia and other futuristic visions of a world controlled by the state, such as Aldous Huxley's or George Orwell's, is the extremist tone of Rand's story. The author lived in a black-and-white world in which things social or communal are evil and things individual and selfish are exalted. This "anthem" culminates in a hymn to the concepts of "I" and "ego," where the rebels are those who resist group action; the oppressors are government officials and others who attempt to provide a safety net for the less fortunate. The production is not improved by the theatricality of narrator Paul Meier, which is reminiscent of a ham Victorian actor intoning an overwrought melodrama. Not recommended.-Mark Pumphrey, Polk Cty. P.L., Columbus, NC
Fact Forum News

"In her usage of the English language she combines clarity of expression with prose of poetic grace. Here, indeed, is an anthem-an anthem, not in the idiom of music, but in the more difficult medium of words alone. This is the most beautiful, the most inspiring novel this reviewer has ever read. It is an ethical and philosophical rather than a religious dedication to freedom and the individual."—Joan DeArmond, Fact Forum News

— Joan DeArmond

All-American Books

"Reading this inspired little story is a rewarding and satisfying experience which no American should deny himself."—All-American Books
Fact Forum News - Joan DeArmond

"In her usage of the English language she combines clarity of expression with prose of poetic grace. Here, indeed, is an anthem-an anthem, not in the idiom of music, but in the more difficult medium of words alone. This is the most beautiful, the most inspiring novel this reviewer has ever read. It is an ethical and philosophical rather than a religious dedication to freedom and the individual."—Joan DeArmond, Fact Forum News
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780451191137
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 3/28/1996
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Edition description: Anniversary, 75th Anniversary Edition
  • Edition number: 50
  • Pages: 272
  • Sales rank: 66,249
  • Lexile: 880L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 4.20 (w) x 6.80 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Born February 2, 1905, Ayn Rand published her first novel, We the Living, in 1936. Anthem followed in 1938. It was with the publication of The Fountainhead (1943) and Atlas Shrugged (1957) that she achieved her spectacular success. Ms. Rand’s unique philosophy, Objectivism, has gained a worldwide audience. The fundamentals of her philosophy are put forth in three nonfiction books, Introduction to Objectivist Epistemology, The Virtue of Selfishness, and Capitalism: The Unknown Ideal. They are all available in Signet editions, as is the magnificent statement of her artistic credo, The Romantic Manifesto.

Biography

Ayn Rand was born in St. Petersburg, Russia, on February 2, 1905. At age six she taught herself to read and two years later discovered her first fictional hero in a French magazine for children, thus capturing the heroic vision that sustained her throughout her life. At the age of nine she decided to make fiction writing her career. Thoroughly opposed to the mysticism and collectivism of Russian culture, she thought of herself as a European writer, especially after encountering authors such as Walter Scott and—in 1918—Victor Hugo, the writer she most admired.

During her high school years, she was eyewitness to both the Kerensky Revolution, which she supported, and—in 1917—the Bolshevik Revolution, which she denounced from the outset. In order to escape the fighting, her family went to the Crimea, where she finished high school. The final Communist victory brought the confiscation of her father's pharmacy and periods of near-starvation. When introduced to American history in her last year of high school, she immediately took America as her model of what a nation of free men could be.

When her family returned from the Crimea, she entered the University of Petrograd to study philosophy and history. Graduating in 1924, she experienced the disintegration of free inquiry and the takeover of the university by communist thugs. Amidst the increasingly gray life, her one great pleasure was Western films and plays. Long a movie fan, she entered the State Institute for Cinema Arts in 1924 to study screen writing.

In late 1925 she obtained permission to leave Soviet Russia for a visit to relatives in the United States. Although she told Soviet authorities that her visit would be short, she was determined never to return to Russia. She arrived in New York City in February 1926. She spent the next six months with her relatives in Chicago, obtained an extension to her visa, and then left for Hollywood to pursue a career as a screenwriter.

On Ayn Rand's second day in Hollywood, Cecil B. DeMille saw her standing at the gate of his studio, offered her a ride to the set of his movie The King of Kings, and gave her a job, first as an extra, then as a script reader. During the next week at the studio, she met an actor, Frank O'Connor, whom she married in 1929; they were married until his death fifty years later.

After struggling for several years at various non-writing jobs, including one in the wardrobe department at the RKO Corporation, she sold her first screenplay, Red Pawn to Universal Studios in 1932 and saw her first stage play, Night of January 16th, produced in Hollywood and then on Broadway. Her first novel, We the Living, was completed in 1933 but was rejected by publishers for years, until The Macmillan Company in the United States and Cassells and Company in England published the book in 1936. The most autobiographical of her novels—it was based on her years under Soviet tyranny—We the Living was not well-received by American intellectuals and reviewers. Ayn Rand was up against the pro-communism dominating the culture during "the Red Decade."

She began writing The Fountainhead in 1935. In the character of the architect Howard Roark, she presented for the first time the kind of hero whose depiction was the chief goal of her writing: the ideal man, man as "he could be and ought to be." The Fountainhead was rejected by twelve publishers but finally accepted by the Bobbs-Merrill Company. When published in 1943, it made history by becoming a best seller through word-of-mouth two years later, and gained for its author lasting recognition as a champion of individualism.

Ayn Rand returned to Hollywood in late 1943 to write the screenplay for The Fountainhead, but wartime restrictions delayed production until 1948. Working part time as a screenwriter for Hal Wallis Productions, she began her major novel, Atlas Shrugged, in 1946. In 1951 she moved back to New York City and devoted herself full time to the completion of Atlas Shrugged.

Published in 1957, Atlas Shrugged was her greatest achievement and last work of fiction. In this novel she dramatized her unique philosophy in an intellectual mystery story that integrated ethics, metaphysics, epistemology, politics, economics and sex. Although she considered herself primarily a fiction writer, she realized that in order to create heroic fictional characters, she had to identify the philosophic principles that make such individuals possible. She needed to formulate "a philosophy for living on earth."

Thereafter, Ayn Rand wrote and lectured on her philosophy—Objectivism. She published and edited her own periodicals from 1962 to 1976, her essays providing much of the material for nine books on Objectivism and its application to the culture. Ayn Rand died on March 6, 1982, in her New York City apartment.

Every book by Ayn Rand published in her lifetime is still in print, and hundreds of thousands of copies are sold each year, so far totaling more than twenty million. Several new volumes have been published posthumously. Her vision of man and her philosophy for living on earth have changed the lives of thousands of readers and launched a philosophic movement with a growing impact on American culture.

Author biography courtesy of The Ayn Rand Institute.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Alice Rosenbaum (real name)
    1. Date of Birth:
      February 2, 1905
    2. Place of Birth:
      St. Petersburg, Russia
    1. Date of Death:
      March 6, 1982
    2. Place of Death:
      New York, New York

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 204 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 22, 2009

    GREAT!

    Anthem by Ayn Rand, was an incredible book. It was interesting on how the author made the future go back to the basics, like the world had completed a cycle and started again. It's fascinating to me how Rand viewed the future. Most people, including me, probably believe that the future is full of flying cars and advance technology. This is the normal view of the future, but Ayn Rand had it that our generation was destroyed along with all our technology and history in a huge war. This was captivating because she her view is very different from the normal.
    The humans left then created a new government and a whole new lifestyle, one that was harsh and random. In a new world where no one was considered an individual, one man found a hidden tunnel in the middle of the forest. He was intrigued by it, and secretly figures out how to make electricity! He was sentenced to death, but ran away. He even found love, which was forbidden. This book was amazing in delivery. It always made me think and I loved how it made me view the world and the future.
    This book is very different, but also very good. I would read it again and again. I'd look for the details I missed because even though I closely read it, I would love to understand it more! I don't think I could ever get enough of this novel. It intrigues me on every page, and I one hundred percent recommend you to read it. It is so much different than other books, which makes it purely mesmerizing to read. I loved it because it was something totally different and made me think. It made me think more of how the future might be. Hopefully, it won't reverse like how it did in the Anthem. I also liked how Rand wrote it, she was frank but also it had a bit of a mysterious and forbidden feel. This was an awesome book! READ IT! YOU WON'T BE SORRY!

    11 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 5, 2008

    an Objectivist primer

    In an age of dwindling Individualism, Rand's words can inspire hope. It's much simpler reading than Atlas Shrugged as a first taste of her thinking. Given her immigration to USA from Russia, she saw firsthand the awfulness of communism and collectivist thinking. She spent a great deal of her life trying to communicate how important and wonderful capitalism and individualism are. Presages Logan's Run for sci-fi fans.

    8 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 29, 2008

    A story that makes you grateful for freedom¿

    Ayn Rands dystopic novel Anthem is a short yet, thought provoking and powerful piece of literature. This story portrays an extreme society in which the people¿s lives are completely controlled by others. It is so extreme that in this society they believe it is even a sin to think the thoughts that no others think. It is a tragedy that they live this way but because they have never known any different they are not aware of how mistreated they are and the great joys life has to offer. No one in the town questions their existence¿ they are given minimal schooling then at fifteen are given a job to do until they are 40 when they are considered ¿useless¿ until they die around the age of 45 or 50. This novel is a journal of one man in the town who desires more from life. He questions and explores. He finds out that there is more to life then just living day to day. He invents things, makes discoveries and even falls in love. However, when he decides to take one of his inventions to the Scholars of the town there is an unexpected twist and things do not turn out as he thought he wanted them to. This novel makes you think hard about the freedoms we have and how awful it would be to live in a society like this. Ayn Rand is a very political and philosophical writer so even though the novel is very good she does plug some of her extreme ideas into the story. This is not necessarily a bad thing but may be obnoxious to some readers. The story overall is wonderful and powerful. You finish it appreciating your own life and feeling victorious for the characters. I have read this multiple times and find it a fascinating story that I cannot put down once I start it. Every time I read it I discover something new and interesting.

    8 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 16, 2008

    Interesting But Too Short

    It is a very interesting, but in my opinion, it is too short. The book's book plot is easy to get into, but the pronouns are confusing. I know that the characters have to use "we" since it is part of the story, but it is still confusing at first. Good descriptions. I liked the ending. I would reccomend to someone who likes their books to come with something to ponder for a while.

    6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 2, 2008

    A reviewer

    Despite its prevalent following and obvious publicity, Anthem remains a pathetic attempt at philosophical literature. Hailed as a controversial classic worthy to join the ranks of Fahrenheit 451, Animal Farm, and 1984, it is clearly unworthy of such admiration. While the author attempts to elevate her unpractical theories of exaggerated individualism, she maintains a definate aura of sexism and is at times unnecessarily vulgar and heavily redundant. A terrible and overrated novel, not worthy of any type of contemplation.

    6 out of 18 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 3, 2008

    Atrocious :(

    Anthem was a supreme disappointment in various ways. The characters were underdeveloped and one-dimensional -- I was not intrigued whatsoever by their personas and dialect. All-in-all, I would wholeheartedly disapprove of this novel. It was a disgrace to human kind. Do not attempt to read such a tedious and grotesque book!

    5 out of 20 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 27, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    A thought provoking work by a brilliant woman

    If lack of word economy has kept you from reading Ayn Rand's other works, this book shares her brilliant writing style and philosophies in short order with a bit of a sci-fi twist. This is a must read for every Ayn Rand or philosophy enthusiast. The fact that this little gem has handwritten notes from her original draft makes it all the more interesting and worth the read.

    4 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 2, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Anthem

    A great novel by an amazing writer that expresses the importance of the self and individuality. A must read for anyone who enjoys alternate societies.

    2 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 1, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    An Awsome Book

    This book is about a man named Equality. He is stuck in a society that revolves around the word we. There is no I in this society. You cannot be by yourself or you get in trouble. It is a story of how he realizes the truth and does something about it. It is super short and packed with good litature. I hope you enjoy!

    2 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 16, 2006

    Don't Read!

    There was no point to this book. It was so slow and I dreaded having to finish reading it for a school project. Her ideas are so far-fetched and hardly make any sense. Unless your looking for a strange book inwhich you won't take anything away...dont read it! This book is useless!

    1 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 9, 2000

    Anthem by Ayn Rand

    I enjoyed the book because it was not just philosophical jibberish. It actually had a story line and a good plot. It was a little confusing at first, with all of the third person. It was fun to read because it was short and to the point.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 9, 2014

    For people that dont know. Click this.

    This book is about communism and is not about someone just running away from a city and starting over. The people are being lied to by the government that it is a dangerous world anywhere out of the will of the government and the people believe them. The person that ran away thought it wasnt right for the government to be that controling and puting fear into everyone. "The Unmentionable Times"are the times before communism where everyone isnt equal and not everything is the same and men and women could be together. The people use the words "we" "our"and "they" because everyone was one person and one person was everyone. Because of communism that is how everyone thought of everyone.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 17, 2014

    Baby Don't Cut | B Mike | Part Two of Two

    | Once again, apologizing ahead of time for any spelling errors. Grammatically speaking, this is like a rap song, so, the grammar is not the best. | <p> Nobody seems to get you, you think you're on your own. <br> Well listen pretty lady you don't have to be alone. <br> So baby don't cut, baby don't cut. <br> You can do anything, just promise baby you won't cut. <br> I know your heart is hurting, you think the road has ended, <br> You may just feel the blade your holding is your only friend. <br> But baby don't cut, baby don't cut. <br> You can do anything, just promise baby you won't cut. <p> He put her arm around his shoulder he's just tryna lean her back up. <br> Yelling out her name as lays her beside the bathtub. <br> He feels his whole world just got hit from an avalanche. <br> Sreaming out so heavily somebody call an ambulance. <br> Feeling mad angry like somebody lead her on to this. <br> Her eyeballs are rolling, drifting out of consciousness. <br> Thinking to himself why the he<3>ll didn't she just stop at will. <br> The tears just keep on rolling as they head to the hospital. <BR> Paramedics rush her in, the doctors call an emergency. <br> She's lost a lot of blood the place looking like a murder scene. <br> An hour later, the doc walks in with a sour face. <br> And says excuse me for the words I'm about to say. <br> I'm sorry for your loss, the boy just starts collapsing. <br> His own world, his own girl just took a crashing. <br> Saying to himself that it's his fault and that he let it up. <br> But baby...I thought you promised you would never cut. <p> Nobody seems to get you, you think you're on your own, <br> Well listen pretty lady you don't have to be alone. <br> So baby don't cut, baby don't cut. <br> You can do anything, just promise baby you won't cut. <br> I know your heart is hurting, you think the road has ended, <br> you may just feel the blade you're holding is your only friend. <br> But baby don't cut, baby don't cut. <br> You can do anything, just promise baby you won't cut. <p> | More songs to come later. My old place for songs was taken over by people for their Bios. Hmph. |

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  • Posted May 15, 2014

    I read this book in my sophemore English class last year. The id

    I read this book in my sophemore English class last year. The idea of the world was fascinating.
     The book was interesting, despite the fact that even after I knew he was one person
     I spent most of it imagining the narrator as a pair of identical twins,  and his girlfriend as well for that matter.
    But what I didn't like? The narrator. Well, actually I liked him fine until about the end of the book.
    When he was daring to fall in love,.and running away he seemed brave and good.
     But at the end of the book he seemed arrogant and cowardly.
    One might think that after escaping oppression you would seek to help those still oppressed,
    or if you were too afraid to want to help them, at least just leave them alone and live in peace.
    But not Prometheus, who as soon ass hrs free, immeddiately declares himself a god,
    and decides he wants to &quot;raze the enslaved population&quot;, not help the oppressed people, destroy them
     (except for his friends, of course).
    Honestly that  line of the book disturbed me more than any of the horrible things of the dystopian society,
    because &quot;Prometheus&quot;, is supposed to be the good guy, the &quot;hero&quot;.
     I love dystopian fiction and I'm all for individualism and freedom, but I find this particular individual despicable.
     If &quot;Prometheus&quot; is the representative of free humanity,
    its little wonder that  the government of his time thinks its better to oppress people, then to let them live free.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 7, 2014

    HORRIBLE!!!!!!!!

    I HATED IT!!!!!!!!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 12, 2013

    I can't fathom what anyone sees in this dull book. It beats you

    I can't fathom what anyone sees in this dull book. It beats you over the head with obvious symbolism and ridiculous caricatures. It's dozens of pages of arguing against straw men. Don't waste your time.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 16, 2013

    Great book to be introduced to Ayn Rand's existentialist philoso

    Great book to be introduced to Ayn Rand's existentialist philosophy. A quick read. Pick up Atlas Shurgged! That is THE Ayn Rand book!

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  • Posted May 22, 2011

    Captivating

    At first I found it hard to understand, especially when Equality 7-2521 said "we" or "our" instead of "I" and "me", but once I figured out that he was talking about himself and not a group I couldn't stop reading. It may not be at the top of most people's reading list, but I suggest reading it at least once. It may be hard to understand at first but if you can get past the beginning, you'll see that is has and an excellent plot and it makes you appreciate how we live today.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 19, 2011

    Anthem

    The book anthem by ayn rand is a good book and I would recommend it to high school students who are looking for an interesting book to read. The book is based in a city where everybody is equal. One lone man by the name of Equality stands up and sais that he has had enough and goes out to make freedom his life.

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  • Posted May 18, 2011

    anthem

    i thought the book was very symbolic and had alot of important life lessons. onee very old message is still relevant. the book has a good ending in my opinion. the book shows the true value of words and how if one wenbt missing i could be catastropic

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 204 Customer Reviews

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